What are the essential conditions for observing the interference phenomenon in the laboratory?

Question:

What are the essential conditions for observing the interference phenomenon in the laboratory?

Interference

Interference is a wave phenomenon where two waves superimpose with each other giving rise to a constructive and destructive pattern when the crest of one wave falls on the crest of the second wave a constructive pattern is formed when the crest of a wave falls on the trough of the second wave a destructive pattern is formed.

Answer and Explanation:

The essential conditions for observing the interference phenomenon in the laboratory are

  1. The initial phase difference between the interfering waves must be constant or there should be no phase difference.
  2. The frequencies and wavelengths of the two waves should be equal otherwise the phase difference will not remain constant.
  3. The light must be monochromatic so that overlapping of pattern due to individual wavelength can be eliminated.
  4. The sources must be narrow because a broad source is equal to a large number of narrow sources.
  5. And finally sources of monochromatic light must be coherent.

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Constructive and Destructive Interference

from CLEP Natural Sciences: Study Guide & Test Prep

Chapter 8 / Lesson 16
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