Copyright

What is the Coulomb constant?

Question:

What is the Coulomb constant?

Coulomb Constant:

Two stationary charged particles apply a force on each other, and because of this force, they may attract or repel each other. This force is known as the electrostatic force and is defined by the Coulomb's law. This law was given by a French physicist named Charles Coulomb in 1777.

Answer and Explanation:

The force between two stationary charges is given by Coulomb's law. This force may be attractive or repulsive. According to the law, the magnitude of the force between two charged objects is dependent on the magnitude of charge on those objects and also the distance between them. The magnitude of force (F) may be given as {eq}F= k \frac{Q_1 Q_2}{r^2} {/eq}, where {eq}Q_1\ and\ Q_2 {/eq} represent the magnitude of charge on the charged bodies and r is the distance between them. The constant factor (k) that appears in the formula is Coulomb's constant. The Coulomb constant is defined as the force between two charged bodies having charge of magnitude 1 C each and at a distance of 1 m apart.


Learn more about this topic:

Coulomb's Law: Variables Affecting the Force Between Two Charged Particles

from CLEP Natural Sciences: Study Guide & Test Prep

Chapter 6 / Lesson 3
78K

Recommended Lessons and Courses for You

Explore our homework questions and answer library