What is the difference between a possessive noun, and a possessive adjective?

Question:

What is the difference between a possessive noun, and a possessive adjective?

Possessive Nouns and Adjectives

A noun is commonly defined as a person, place, thing, idea, or quality. Nouns become possessive once they are changed to show ownership. An adjective is a word or phrase naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it. An adjective becomes possessive when used to demonstrate ownership.

Answer and Explanation:

In English, a possessive noun is a noun that demonstrates ownership. For example:

Mark's clothes were dirty.

Mark's is the possessive noun of the object (clothes).

Possessive nouns begin as simple nouns and are changed in order to show possession by adding an apostrophe and the letter s. Mark > Mark's. Possessive nouns can be used in place of a noun, to avoid repeating it in a sentence.

Some common possessive pronouns that you might come across include, 'mine', 'yours' 'his', 'hers', and 'ours.'.

A possessive adjective comes before a noun in the sentence and lets us know to whom the noun belongs. Possessive adjectives are not nouns and are not formed by adding an apostrophe and the letter s. For example:

Mark washed her dirty clothes.

Her is the possessive adjective as the object (clothes) do no belong to the noun (Mark).

Common possessive adjectives include 'my', 'your', 'his', 'her' and 'our.'. They should always go before the noun.


Learn more about this topic:

What Are Possessive Nouns? - Examples, Definition & Types

from Comprehensive English: Overview & Practice

Chapter 1 / Lesson 3
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