Where do the electrons that reduce NAD+ to NADH and FAD to FADH2 come from in glycolysis and...

Question:

Where do the electrons that reduce NAD+ to NADH and FAD to FADH2 come from in glycolysis and citric acid cycle during cellular respiration?

Function of Cellular Respiration:

Cellular respiration is the process that cells use to make ATP, or energy. Cellular respiration in most eukaryotic cells has three steps, glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation. The purpose of glycolysis and the citric acid cycle is to collect electrons to use during oxidative phosphorylation.

Answer and Explanation:

The electrons that reduce NAD+ to NADH come from glyceraldehyde-3 phosphate, a derivative of glucose during glycolysis. The electrons that reduce FAD to FADH2 during the citric acid cycle come from succinate. During glycolysis and the citric acid cycle glucose is converted to different forms using a series of enzymes. Some of these enzymes reduce the electron carriers NAD+ and FAD in order to bring electrons to the electron transport chain. The glucose derived molecules are thus oxidized during the process. The entire purpose of oxidizing glucose through these steps is to gather electrons via the electron carriers to bring them to the electron transport chain for oxidative phosphorylation, which produces most of the ATP for the cell.


Learn more about this topic:

Glycolysis & the Citric Acid Cycle

from Campbell Biology: Online Textbook Help

Chapter 9 / Lesson 8
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