Why did the loud soldier object to marching in The Red Badge of Courage?

Question:

Why did the loud soldier object to marching in The Red Badge of Courage?

Preparing for Battle

In the third chapter of Stephen Crane's novel The Red Badge of Courage, the men continue to march. The command is to keep them moving and have the troops ready at a moment's notice. It would seem that all this marching keeps the men active and ready for battle.

Answer and Explanation:

The loud soldier who objects to marching in Stephen Crane's The Red Badge of Courage is Wilson. Wilson admits that he does not mind marching, but it has to have a purpose. Ideally, the end result of all the marching would be to engage in battle against the enemy. For right now, however, Wilson and the other soldiers aren't heading in toward that end. This is why he loudly complains.

Wilson wants there to be purpose to his marching. He doesn't want to go back and forth with no legitimate result of his actions. He wants to fight. He wants to battle the enemy. Marching here and there for no apparent reason irritates Wilson, and he makes it known to everyone that he is not happy with the lack of action.


Learn more about this topic:

The Red Badge of Courage Chapter 3 Summary
The Red Badge of Courage Chapter 3 Summary

from The Red Badge of Courage Study Guide

Chapter 7 / Lesson 3
1.2K

Explore our homework questions and answer library