Why does current flow in the opposite direction of electrons in a conducting wire?

Question:

Why does current flow in the opposite direction of electrons in a conducting wire?

Electric Current

An electric current or just simply current is a net flow of electron in a wire or a conductor. Ohm's law gives the relationship of the voltage, current, and resistance in a circuit.

Ohm's law

{eq}V = IR {/eq}

where V is the voltage, I is the current, and R is the resistance.

Answer and Explanation:


It's because it was assumed that current was due to the flow of positive charge (proton) so it came from the positive side of the terminal of the battery going into the negative terminal of the battery.


It was then corrected when it's established that current is a flow of electron and that convention is still used today (somewhat a tradition or being used to).


The flow of current or the convention doesn't affect how you evaluate the circuit and its complexity as long as you're consistent with the flow you used.


Learn more about this topic:

Loading...
What is Electric Current? - Definition, Unit & Types

from CLEP Natural Sciences: Study Guide & Test Prep

Chapter 6 / Lesson 7
307K

Related to this Question

Explore our homework questions and answers library