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ACT Prep: Help and Review Final Exam

Free Practice Test Instructions:

Choose your answer to the question and click 'Continue' to see how you did. Then click 'Next Question' to answer the next question. When you have completed the free practice test, click 'View Results' to see your results. Good luck!

Question 1 1. How do dramatic irony and situational irony differ?

Question 2 2. You have written an essay in which you claim that 'Southern Georgia was once the home to an underground civilization.' Which of the following provides the BEST evidence in order to convince your reader? Why?

Question 3 3. Subtract the following matrices:

Question 4 4. A rusted lump of iron, I didn't think the find looked like anything special, but the archaeologists were very excited.

Question 5 5. Why is structure so important in writing fiction?

Question 6 6. Steve wants to write a convincing argument supporting the need for reducing carbon emissions from cars. Which of the following is NOT an approach he should use to write a good argument?

Question 7 7. Which of the following will you NOT see much on Conflicting Viewpoints passages?

Question 8 8. You go to the checkout counter, but all you find is a mannequin is an example of _____ narration.

Question 9 9.

Identify the verb or verbs in the following sentence:

She poured a drink for herself and took a very long sip.

Question 10 10. A brick wall has 60 bricks in the first row, but each row has 3 fewer bricks than the previous one. How many bricks are in the 12th row?

Question 11 11. The ACT Math section has...

Question 12 12.

Choose the best replacement for the underlined portion of the sentence:

I was halfway through my grocery shopping when I got a text from my mom: she wanted me to pick up some extra salsa.

Question 13 13. Which of the following is NOT a symbol commonly used to represent the United States?

Question 14 14.

In a controversial decision in 2006, Pluto was re-classified from 'planet' to 'dwarf planet,' in part because it does not clear the area around its orbit. The passages below give you the opinion of two scientists on this decision.

Scientist 1

The classification of a 'planet' as distinguished from a 'dwarf planet' or a 'plutoid' is ultimately arbitrary. It does not spring from some self-evident law of the universe, but from the human desire to sort objects into types and classify them by consistent standards. Clearing the neighborhood around its orbit is a standard that humans created for defining our term 'planet' - but what's stopping us from changing that standard? Nothing: the definition is as arbitrary as the collection of syllables we use to refer to it. Linguistic nit-picking, not science, is the reason why Pluto is no longer a 'planet.'

Scientist 2

Scientific language cannot just mean whatever we want it to mean: without a clear and objective definition, terms like 'planet' would be useless. And when we find that an object has been misclassified, the only way to keep our language useful is to re-classify it appropriately, not to simply change words to cover up our own mistakes. This is what has happened with Pluto. It simply does not meet the definition of a 'planet,' and expanding the term 'planet' to cover it would make the word meaningless. However fond our memories of 7th grade Science class might be, the only true solution is to reclassify Pluto.

Which of the following is mentioned in Passage 1, but not Passage 2?

Question 15 15. Estimate the value of √44 to two places past the decimal.

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ACT Prep: Help and Review Final Free Practice Test Instructions

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