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AP English Literature: Exam Prep Final Exam

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Question 1 1. Which of the following authors was NOT part of the Transcendentalist American literary movement?

Question 2 2. Which of the following types of prose literature typically begins as an oral tradition passed down in a community and sometimes, but not always, has a moral lesson?

Question 3 3. Which of the following literary periods or movements is characterized by humanism, a focus on the human rather than the supernatural or religious?

Question 4 4. Which of the following types of poetic meter BEST identifies the rhythm of this line from William Blake's poem ''The Tyger?'' ''Tyger Tyger, burning bright.''

Question 5 5. Which of the following literary devices is used in this sentence? ''His heart was broken like a shattered glass jar.''

Question 6 6. In a literary passage, diction refers to:

Question 7 7. Which of the following BEST describes the difference between an ode and an elegy?

Use this material to answer questions #8 through #11

I look'd upon the rotting sea,

And drew my eyes away;

I look'd upon the rotting deck,

And there the dead men lay.

I look'd to heaven, and tried to pray; (245)

But or ever a prayer had gusht,

A wicked whisper came, and made

My heart as dry as dust.

I closed my lids, and kept them close,

And the balls like pulses beat; (250)

For the sky and the sea, and the sea and the sky,

Lay like a load on my weary eye,

And the dead were at my feet.

The cold sweat melted from their limbs,

Nor rot nor reek did they: (255)

The look with which they look'd on me

Had never pass'd away.

An orphan's curse would drag to hell

A spirit from on high;

But oh! more horrible than that (260)

Is the curse in a dead man's eye!

Seven days, seven nights, I saw that curse,

And yet I could not die.

The moving Moon went up the sky,

And nowhere did abide; (265)

Softly she was going up,

And a star or two beside?

Her beams bemock'd the sultry main,

Like April hoar-frost spread;

But where the ship's huge shadow lay, (270)

The charm�d water burnt alway

A still and awful red.

- From ''The Rime of the Ancient Mariner'' by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Question 8 8. In line 250 of this poem, what is ''balls'' referring to?

Use this material to answer questions #8 through #11

I look'd upon the rotting sea,

And drew my eyes away;

I look'd upon the rotting deck,

And there the dead men lay.

I look'd to heaven, and tried to pray; (245)

But or ever a prayer had gusht,

A wicked whisper came, and made

My heart as dry as dust.

I closed my lids, and kept them close,

And the balls like pulses beat; (250)

For the sky and the sea, and the sea and the sky,

Lay like a load on my weary eye,

And the dead were at my feet.

The cold sweat melted from their limbs,

Nor rot nor reek did they: (255)

The look with which they look'd on me

Had never pass'd away.

An orphan's curse would drag to hell

A spirit from on high;

But oh! more horrible than that (260)

Is the curse in a dead man's eye!

Seven days, seven nights, I saw that curse,

And yet I could not die.

The moving Moon went up the sky,

And nowhere did abide; (265)

Softly she was going up,

And a star or two beside?

Her beams bemock'd the sultry main,

Like April hoar-frost spread;

But where the ship's huge shadow lay, (270)

The charm�d water burnt alway

A still and awful red.

- From ''The Rime of the Ancient Mariner'' by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Question 9 9. Which of the following BEST describes the implication of lines 257-58?

Use this material to answer questions #8 through #11

I look'd upon the rotting sea,

And drew my eyes away;

I look'd upon the rotting deck,

And there the dead men lay.

I look'd to heaven, and tried to pray; (245)

But or ever a prayer had gusht,

A wicked whisper came, and made

My heart as dry as dust.

I closed my lids, and kept them close,

And the balls like pulses beat; (250)

For the sky and the sea, and the sea and the sky,

Lay like a load on my weary eye,

And the dead were at my feet.

The cold sweat melted from their limbs,

Nor rot nor reek did they: (255)

The look with which they look'd on me

Had never pass'd away.

An orphan's curse would drag to hell

A spirit from on high;

But oh! more horrible than that (260)

Is the curse in a dead man's eye!

Seven days, seven nights, I saw that curse,

And yet I could not die.

The moving Moon went up the sky,

And nowhere did abide; (265)

Softly she was going up,

And a star or two beside?

Her beams bemock'd the sultry main,

Like April hoar-frost spread;

But where the ship's huge shadow lay, (270)

The charm�d water burnt alway

A still and awful red.

- From ''The Rime of the Ancient Mariner'' by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Question 10 10. Why can the speaker not pray in the first stanza of this passage?

Use this material to answer questions #8 through #11

I look'd upon the rotting sea,

And drew my eyes away;

I look'd upon the rotting deck,

And there the dead men lay.

I look'd to heaven, and tried to pray; (245)

But or ever a prayer had gusht,

A wicked whisper came, and made

My heart as dry as dust.

I closed my lids, and kept them close,

And the balls like pulses beat; (250)

For the sky and the sea, and the sea and the sky,

Lay like a load on my weary eye,

And the dead were at my feet.

The cold sweat melted from their limbs,

Nor rot nor reek did they: (255)

The look with which they look'd on me

Had never pass'd away.

An orphan's curse would drag to hell

A spirit from on high;

But oh! more horrible than that (260)

Is the curse in a dead man's eye!

Seven days, seven nights, I saw that curse,

And yet I could not die.

The moving Moon went up the sky,

And nowhere did abide; (265)

Softly she was going up,

And a star or two beside?

Her beams bemock'd the sultry main,

Like April hoar-frost spread;

But where the ship's huge shadow lay, (270)

The charm�d water burnt alway

A still and awful red.

- From ''The Rime of the Ancient Mariner'' by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Question 11 11. What is the purpose of the symbolism of the red water in line 272?

Question 12 12. Which of the following is an example of a feminine rhyme?

Question 13 13. In Herman Melville's novel Moby Dick, ''Pequod'' is the name of which of the following?

Use this material to answer questions #14 through #15

(1) As I said this I suddenly beheld the figure of a man, at some distance, advancing towards me with superhuman speed.

(2) He bounded over the crevices in the ice, among which I had walked with caution; his stature, also, as he approached, seemed to exceed that of a man.

(3) I was troubled; a mist came over my eyes, and I felt a faintness seize me; but I was quickly restored by the cold gale of the mountains.

(4) I perceived, as the shape came nearer (sight tremendous and abhorred!) that it was the wretch whom I had created.

(5) I trembled with rage and horror, resolving to wait his approach and then close with him in mortal combat.

(6) He approached; his countenance bespoke bitter anguish, combined with disdain and malignity, while its unearthly ugliness rendered it almost too horrible for human eyes.

(7) But I scarcely observed this; rage and hatred had at first deprived me of utterance, and I recovered only to overwhelm him with words expressive of furious detestation and contempt.

- From Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Question 14 14. Which of the following BEST describes the speaker's reaction to seeing the figure of the superhuman man?

Use this material to answer questions #14 through #15

(1) As I said this I suddenly beheld the figure of a man, at some distance, advancing towards me with superhuman speed.

(2) He bounded over the crevices in the ice, among which I had walked with caution; his stature, also, as he approached, seemed to exceed that of a man.

(3) I was troubled; a mist came over my eyes, and I felt a faintness seize me; but I was quickly restored by the cold gale of the mountains.

(4) I perceived, as the shape came nearer (sight tremendous and abhorred!) that it was the wretch whom I had created.

(5) I trembled with rage and horror, resolving to wait his approach and then close with him in mortal combat.

(6) He approached; his countenance bespoke bitter anguish, combined with disdain and malignity, while its unearthly ugliness rendered it almost too horrible for human eyes.

(7) But I scarcely observed this; rage and hatred had at first deprived me of utterance, and I recovered only to overwhelm him with words expressive of furious detestation and contempt.

- From Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Question 15 15. What is the importance of describing the figure's athletic ability and stature in sentence 2?

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AP English Literature: Exam Prep Final Free Practice Test Instructions

Choose your answer to the question and click 'Continue' to see how you did. Then click 'Next Question' to answer the next question. When you have completed the free practice test, click 'View Results' to see your results. Good luck!

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