CLEP Analyzing & Interpreting Literature: Study Guide & Test Prep Final Exam

Exam Instructions:

Choose your answers to the questions and click 'Next' to see the next set of questions. You can skip questions if you would like and come back to them later with the yellow "Go To First Skipped Question" button. When you have completed the practice exam, a green submit button will appear. Click it to see your results. Good luck!

Page 1

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #3

Death, be not proud, though some have called thee

Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so;

For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow

Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.

From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be,

Much pleasure; then from thee much more must flow,

And soonest our best men with thee do go,

Rest of their bones, and soul's delivery.

Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men,

And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell,

And poppy or charms can make us sleep as well

And better than thy stroke; why swell'st thou then?

One short sleep past, we wake eternally

And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.

(1633)

Question 1 1. The speaker talking to Death throughout this poem is an example of

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #3

Death, be not proud, though some have called thee

Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so;

For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow

Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.

From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be,

Much pleasure; then from thee much more must flow,

And soonest our best men with thee do go,

Rest of their bones, and soul's delivery.

Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men,

And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell,

And poppy or charms can make us sleep as well

And better than thy stroke; why swell'st thou then?

One short sleep past, we wake eternally

And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.

(1633)

Question 2 2. The poem as a whole presents Death as

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #3

Death, be not proud, though some have called thee

Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so;

For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow

Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.

From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be,

Much pleasure; then from thee much more must flow,

And soonest our best men with thee do go,

Rest of their bones, and soul's delivery.

Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men,

And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell,

And poppy or charms can make us sleep as well

And better than thy stroke; why swell'st thou then?

One short sleep past, we wake eternally

And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.

(1633)

Question 3 3. As seen best in lines 4-5, this poem's meter and/or rhyme scheme is

Use this material to answer questions #4 through #6

Do not go gentle into that good night,

Old age should burn and rave at close of day;

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,

Because their words had forked no lightning they

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright

Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,

And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight

Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,

Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

(1947)

Question 4 4. The phrasing in line 8 (''Their...bay'') is best described as an example of

Use this material to answer questions #4 through #6

Do not go gentle into that good night,

Old age should burn and rave at close of day;

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,

Because their words had forked no lightning they

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright

Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,

And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight

Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,

Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

(1947)

Question 5 5. Which of the following best describes the majority of the stanzas in this poem?

Page 2

Use this material to answer questions #4 through #6

Do not go gentle into that good night,

Old age should burn and rave at close of day;

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,

Because their words had forked no lightning they

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright

Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,

And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight

Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,

Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

(1947)

Question 6 6. As used throughout the poem, ''Do not go gentle into that good night'' most nearly means

Use this material to answer questions #7 through #9

CHORUS: Ah! poor lady, woe is thee! Alas, for thy sorrows! Whither wilt thou turn? What protection, what home or country to save thee from thy troubles wilt thou find? O Medea, in what a hopeless sea of misery heaven hath plunged thee!

MEDEA: On all sides sorrow pens me in. Who shall gainsay this? But all is not yet lost! think not so. Still are there troubles in store for the new bride, and for her bridegroom no light toil. Dost think I would ever have fawned on yonder man, unless to gain some end or form some scheme? Nay, would not so much as have spoken to him or touched him with my hand. But he has in folly so far stepped in that, though he might have checked my plot by banishing me from the land, he hath allowed me to abide this day, in which I will lay low in death three of my enemies-a father and his daughter and my husband too....Bitter and sad will I make their marriage for them; bitter shall be the wooing of it, bitter my exile from the land. Up, then, Medea, spare not the secrets of thy art in plotting and devising; on to the danger. Now comes a struggle needing courage. Dost see what thou art suffering? 'Tis not for thee to be a laughing-stock to the race of Sisyphus by reason of this wedding of Jason, sprung, as thou art, from noble sire, and of the Sun-god's race. Thou hast cunning; and, more than this, we women, though by nature little apt for virtuous deeds, are most expert to fashion any mischief.

(c. 431 BCE)

Question 7 7. How does the chorus feel about or act towards Medea in this passage?

Use this material to answer questions #7 through #9

CHORUS: Ah! poor lady, woe is thee! Alas, for thy sorrows! Whither wilt thou turn? What protection, what home or country to save thee from thy troubles wilt thou find? O Medea, in what a hopeless sea of misery heaven hath plunged thee!

MEDEA: On all sides sorrow pens me in. Who shall gainsay this? But all is not yet lost! think not so. Still are there troubles in store for the new bride, and for her bridegroom no light toil. Dost think I would ever have fawned on yonder man, unless to gain some end or form some scheme? Nay, would not so much as have spoken to him or touched him with my hand. But he has in folly so far stepped in that, though he might have checked my plot by banishing me from the land, he hath allowed me to abide this day, in which I will lay low in death three of my enemies-a father and his daughter and my husband too....Bitter and sad will I make their marriage for them; bitter shall be the wooing of it, bitter my exile from the land. Up, then, Medea, spare not the secrets of thy art in plotting and devising; on to the danger. Now comes a struggle needing courage. Dost see what thou art suffering? 'Tis not for thee to be a laughing-stock to the race of Sisyphus by reason of this wedding of Jason, sprung, as thou art, from noble sire, and of the Sun-god's race. Thou hast cunning; and, more than this, we women, though by nature little apt for virtuous deeds, are most expert to fashion any mischief.

(c. 431 BCE)

Question 8 8. In the passage, Medea's motivating force for her actions is

Use this material to answer questions #7 through #9

CHORUS: Ah! poor lady, woe is thee! Alas, for thy sorrows! Whither wilt thou turn? What protection, what home or country to save thee from thy troubles wilt thou find? O Medea, in what a hopeless sea of misery heaven hath plunged thee!

MEDEA: On all sides sorrow pens me in. Who shall gainsay this? But all is not yet lost! think not so. Still are there troubles in store for the new bride, and for her bridegroom no light toil. Dost think I would ever have fawned on yonder man, unless to gain some end or form some scheme? Nay, would not so much as have spoken to him or touched him with my hand. But he has in folly so far stepped in that, though he might have checked my plot by banishing me from the land, he hath allowed me to abide this day, in which I will lay low in death three of my enemies-a father and his daughter and my husband too....Bitter and sad will I make their marriage for them; bitter shall be the wooing of it, bitter my exile from the land. Up, then, Medea, spare not the secrets of thy art in plotting and devising; on to the danger. Now comes a struggle needing courage. Dost see what thou art suffering? 'Tis not for thee to be a laughing-stock to the race of Sisyphus by reason of this wedding of Jason, sprung, as thou art, from noble sire, and of the Sun-god's race. Thou hast cunning; and, more than this, we women, though by nature little apt for virtuous deeds, are most expert to fashion any mischief.

(c. 431 BCE)

Question 9 9. In the sixth sentence of Medea's speech (''though he might have checked my plot by banishing me from the land''), ''checked'' most nearly means

Use this material to answer questions #10 through #12

However mean your life is, meet it and live it; do not shun it and call it hard names. It is not so bad as you are. It looks poorest when you are richest. The fault-finder will find faults even in paradise. Love your life, poor as it is. You may perhaps have some pleasant, thrilling, glorious hours, even in a poorhouse. The setting sun is reflected from the windows of the almshouse as brightly as from the rich man's abode; the snow melts before its door as early in the spring. I do not see but a quiet mind may live as contentedly there, and have as cheering thoughts, as in a palace.

(1854)

Question 10 10. For what does ''The setting sun is reflected from the windows of the almshouse as brightly as from the rich man's abode'' act as a metaphor?

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Use this material to answer questions #10 through #12

However mean your life is, meet it and live it; do not shun it and call it hard names. It is not so bad as you are. It looks poorest when you are richest. The fault-finder will find faults even in paradise. Love your life, poor as it is. You may perhaps have some pleasant, thrilling, glorious hours, even in a poorhouse. The setting sun is reflected from the windows of the almshouse as brightly as from the rich man's abode; the snow melts before its door as early in the spring. I do not see but a quiet mind may live as contentedly there, and have as cheering thoughts, as in a palace.

(1854)

Question 11 11. As used in the first sentence, ''mean'' most closely means

Use this material to answer questions #10 through #12

However mean your life is, meet it and live it; do not shun it and call it hard names. It is not so bad as you are. It looks poorest when you are richest. The fault-finder will find faults even in paradise. Love your life, poor as it is. You may perhaps have some pleasant, thrilling, glorious hours, even in a poorhouse. The setting sun is reflected from the windows of the almshouse as brightly as from the rich man's abode; the snow melts before its door as early in the spring. I do not see but a quiet mind may live as contentedly there, and have as cheering thoughts, as in a palace.

(1854)

Question 12 12. In this passage, ''quiet mind'' is an example of

Use this material to answer questions #13 through #15

On hearing these words from his mother Gregor realized that the lack of all direct human speech for the past two months together with the monotony of family life must have confused his mind, otherwise he could not account for the fact that he had quite earnestly looked forward to having his room emptied of furnishing. Did he really want his warm room, so comfortably fitted with old family furniture, to be turned into a naked den in which he would certainly be able to crawl unhampered in all directions but at the price of shedding simultaneously all recollection of his human background? He had indeed been so near the brink of forgetfulness that only the voice of his mother, which he had not heard for so long, had drawn him back from it. Nothing should be taken out of his room; everything must stay as it was; he could not dispense with the good influence of the furniture on his state of mind; and even if the furniture did hamper him in his senseless crawling round and round, that was no drawback but a great advantage.

(1912)

Question 13 13. What is the ''good influence of the furniture on his state of mind'' in this passage?

Use this material to answer questions #13 through #15

On hearing these words from his mother Gregor realized that the lack of all direct human speech for the past two months together with the monotony of family life must have confused his mind, otherwise he could not account for the fact that he had quite earnestly looked forward to having his room emptied of furnishing. Did he really want his warm room, so comfortably fitted with old family furniture, to be turned into a naked den in which he would certainly be able to crawl unhampered in all directions but at the price of shedding simultaneously all recollection of his human background? He had indeed been so near the brink of forgetfulness that only the voice of his mother, which he had not heard for so long, had drawn him back from it. Nothing should be taken out of his room; everything must stay as it was; he could not dispense with the good influence of the furniture on his state of mind; and even if the furniture did hamper him in his senseless crawling round and round, that was no drawback but a great advantage.

(1912)

Question 14 14. The desire for the emptiness of the room mentioned in this passage represents all of the following EXCEPT

Use this material to answer questions #13 through #15

On hearing these words from his mother Gregor realized that the lack of all direct human speech for the past two months together with the monotony of family life must have confused his mind, otherwise he could not account for the fact that he had quite earnestly looked forward to having his room emptied of furnishing. Did he really want his warm room, so comfortably fitted with old family furniture, to be turned into a naked den in which he would certainly be able to crawl unhampered in all directions but at the price of shedding simultaneously all recollection of his human background? He had indeed been so near the brink of forgetfulness that only the voice of his mother, which he had not heard for so long, had drawn him back from it. Nothing should be taken out of his room; everything must stay as it was; he could not dispense with the good influence of the furniture on his state of mind; and even if the furniture did hamper him in his senseless crawling round and round, that was no drawback but a great advantage.

(1912)

Question 15 15. In the last sentence of the passage, ''senseless'' most closely means

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Question 16 16. Which of the following is a short summary of a play important to the Theatre of the Absurd?

Question 17 17. Martha is watching a play written during the times of epic theatre. At one point, she notices that many of the staging elements are visible and considers this to be odd. Her friend later explains that the main goal of the play is to make her think critically, rather than passively and that that is why the lighting was visible during the play. Which of the following BEST describes what Martha was wondering about?

Question 18 18. Which of the following is NOT one of the characters in a melodrama?

Question 19 19. Why are The Three Stooges shorts good examples of modern farce?

Question 20 20. Which of the following is NOT an example of low comedy?

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Question 21 21. How can writing an outline before writing a response to an essay question be helpful?

Question 22 22. As you review your practice essay in order to evaluate it, you should _____

Question 23 23. What key method can you use to determine major opposing views?

Question 24 24. Why is it always important to anticipate and refute possible opposing views in your argumentative paper?

Question 25 25. Why is it important to make an outline prior to writing an essay?

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Question 26 26. Any dramatic work written in lines of verse, such as Shakespeare's plays, are known as _____.

Question 27 27. In Whitman's first stanza, when he says, O heart! heart! heart! as he sees the bleeding drops of red, Where on the deck my Captain lies, Fallen cold and dead, what stage of loss is he describing?

Question 28 28. A _____ is a stanza that is made up of four lines having alternative rhythms.

Question 29 29. The pattern of five sets of unstressed/stressed iambs is called _____.

Question 30 30.

The following excerpt is an example of which type of literary device?

'O I forbid you, maiden all,

That wears gold in your hair,

To come or go by Carterhaugh

For young Tam Lin is there.

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Question 31 31. How do we distinguish understatement from exaggeration?

Question 32 32. How do synecdoche and metonymy differ?

Question 33 33. Which of the following terms might be another word for 'motif'?

Question 34 34. How does symbolism make writing stronger?

Question 35 35. Which of the following is an example of apostrophe?

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Question 36 36. Tom is guiding a group of his students through a big picture reading of Romeo and Juliet. Which of the scenarios below should NOT be included as part of this guided reading?

Question 37 37. Breaking apart a word into its component parts is an example of using _____.

Question 38 38. When reading a story, it is important to _____ or find the intended meaning.

Question 39 39. A student is reading a book, and they come across the word heliogram. They don't know what it means, but they do know that heliocentric means having the sun at the center. What strategy would the student use and why?

Question 40 40. Which is the best definition for the connotation of a word?

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Question 41 41. Instructive letters, formal in tone and found in the Bible are called _____.

Question 42 42. What do fables, folktales, myths and legends have in common?

Question 43 43. Why might an author use foreshadowing?

Question 44 44. How do legends differ from the other kinds of stories explored in this lesson?

Question 45 45. The sun was bright and the sky was clear. Joan jogged down the path with Rex at her side and smiled about last night's victory. The tone of this excerpt can be best described as _____.

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Question 46 46. Which of the following is an example of a farce?

Question 47 47. When incorporating source material in your essay, you should _____

Question 48 48. When Whitman writes, the ship is anchor'd safe and sound, its voyage closed and done he is describing the _____ stage of loss.

Question 49 49. Harry caught sight of Seamus's eye and Seamus winked. This quote from 'Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone' is an example of what kind of narration?

Question 50 50. What does it mean to interpret literature?

CLEP Analyzing & Interpreting Literature: Study Guide & Test Prep Final Exam Instructions

Choose your answers to the questions and click 'Next' to see the next set of questions. You can skip questions if you would like and come back to them later with the yellow "Go To First Skipped Question" button. When you have completed the practice exam, a green submit button will appear. Click it to see your results. Good luck!

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