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CSET Multiple Subjects Subtest I (101) | Study Guide & Practice Test Final Exam

Free Practice Test Instructions:

Choose your answer to the question and click 'Continue' to see how you did. Then click 'Next Question' to answer the next question. When you have completed the free practice test, click 'View Results' to see your results. Good luck!

Question 1 1.

Based on this image, what was the artist saying about the "Chinese Exclusion Act?"

Answers:
Use this material to answer question #2

Read the first stanza from 'The Lost Leader' by Robert Browning first published in 1845; then answer the two questions that follow.


Just for a handful of silver he left us,

Just for a riband to stick in his coat--

Found the one gift of which fortune bereft us,

Lost all the others she lets us devote;

5

They, with the gold to give, doled him out silver,

So much was theirs who so little allowed:

How all our copper had gone for his service!

Rags--were they purple, his heart had been proud!

We that had loved him so, followed him, honoured him,

10

Lived in his mild and magnificent eye,

Learned his great language, caught his clear accents,

Made him our pattern to live and to die!

Shakespeare was of us, Milton was for us,

Burns, Shelley, were with us,--they watch from their graves!

15

He alone breaks from the van and the freemen,

--He alone sinks to the rear and the slaves!

Question 2 2. Which of the following denotes the metrical foot of this poem?

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Question 3 3.

Use the map below to answer the question that follows. The black line outlines the southern edge of what mountain range?

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Question 4 4.

During the Golden Age of Islam, how would the literacy rate of the average citizen in Baghdad likely compare to contemporary civilizations?

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Question 5 5.

What is the purpose of an informative essay?

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Question 6 6.

Which of the following important historical documents illustrates the application of philosopher John Locke's political theories?

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Question 7 7.

Which of the following would best describe Jewish Diaspora?

Answers:
Use this material to answer questions #8 through #9

Read the passage below; then answer the two questions that follow.


Vincent van Gogh was a Dutch artist whose work is part of the post-impressionist movement. The post-impressionist movement describes an artistic movement during the late-19th century, this movement rejected the purpose of painting as a means of realistically depicting the world and instead emphasized painting subjective, abstracted elements that conveyed poignant emotions. Van Gogh's works, with its piercing emotions and abstracted qualities, continue to be important points of study for students of post-impressionism.

Question 8 8. The first sentence of this passage is a:

Answers:
Use this material to answer questions #8 through #9

Read the passage below; then answer the two questions that follow.


Vincent van Gogh was a Dutch artist whose work is part of the post-impressionist movement. The post-impressionist movement describes an artistic movement during the late-19th century, this movement rejected the purpose of painting as a means of realistically depicting the world and instead emphasized painting subjective, abstracted elements that conveyed poignant emotions. Van Gogh's works, with its piercing emotions and abstracted qualities, continue to be important points of study for students of post-impressionism.

Question 9 9. The second sentence of this passage has which of the following errors?

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Question 10 10.

Which of the following is most likely to indicate a source's credibility?

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Question 11 11.

Which of the following describes the heuristic function of language?

Answers:
Use this material to answer questions #12 through #14

1 What does laughter mean? 2 What is the basal element in the laughable? 3 What common ground can we find between the grimace of a merry-andrew, a play upon words, an equivocal situation in a burlesque and a scene of high comedy? 4 What method of distillation will yield us invariably the same essence from which so many different products borrow either their obtrusive odour or their delicate perfume? 5 The greatest of thinkers, from Aristotle downwards, have tackled this little problem, which has a knack of baffling every effort, of slipping away and escaping only to bob up again, a pert challenge flung at philosophic speculation. 6 Our excuse for attacking the problem in our turn must lie in the fact that we shall not aim at imprisoning the comic spirit within a definition. 7 We regard it, above all, as a living thing. 8 However trivial it may be, we shall treat it with the respect due to life. 9 We shall confine ourselves to watching it grow and expand. 10 Passing by imperceptible gradations from one form to another, it will be seen to achieve the strangest metamorphoses. 11 We shall disdain nothing we have seen. 12 Maybe we may gain from this prolonged contact, for the matter of that, something more flexible than an abstract definition,-a practical, intimate acquaintance, such as springs from a long companionship. 13 And maybe we may also find that, unintentionally, we have made an acquaintance that is useful. 14 For the comic spirit has a logic of its own, even in its wildest eccentricities. 15 It has a method in its madness. 16 It dreams, I admit, but it conjures up, in its dreams, visions that are at once accepted and understood by the whole of a social group. 17 Can it then fail to throw light for us on the way that human imagination works, and more particularly social, collective, and popular imagination? 18 Begotten of real life and akin to art, should it not also have something of its own to tell us about art and life?

19 At the outset we shall put forward three observations which we look upon as fundamental. 20 They have less bearing on the actually comic than on the field within which it must be sought.

("Laughter: An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic")

Question 12 12.

Which sentence contains a dependent clause?

Answers:
Use this material to answer questions #12 through #14

1 What does laughter mean? 2 What is the basal element in the laughable? 3 What common ground can we find between the grimace of a merry-andrew, a play upon words, an equivocal situation in a burlesque and a scene of high comedy? 4 What method of distillation will yield us invariably the same essence from which so many different products borrow either their obtrusive odour or their delicate perfume? 5 The greatest of thinkers, from Aristotle downwards, have tackled this little problem, which has a knack of baffling every effort, of slipping away and escaping only to bob up again, a pert challenge flung at philosophic speculation. 6 Our excuse for attacking the problem in our turn must lie in the fact that we shall not aim at imprisoning the comic spirit within a definition. 7 We regard it, above all, as a living thing. 8 However trivial it may be, we shall treat it with the respect due to life. 9 We shall confine ourselves to watching it grow and expand. 10 Passing by imperceptible gradations from one form to another, it will be seen to achieve the strangest metamorphoses. 11 We shall disdain nothing we have seen. 12 Maybe we may gain from this prolonged contact, for the matter of that, something more flexible than an abstract definition,-a practical, intimate acquaintance, such as springs from a long companionship. 13 And maybe we may also find that, unintentionally, we have made an acquaintance that is useful. 14 For the comic spirit has a logic of its own, even in its wildest eccentricities. 15 It has a method in its madness. 16 It dreams, I admit, but it conjures up, in its dreams, visions that are at once accepted and understood by the whole of a social group. 17 Can it then fail to throw light for us on the way that human imagination works, and more particularly social, collective, and popular imagination? 18 Begotten of real life and akin to art, should it not also have something of its own to tell us about art and life?

19 At the outset we shall put forward three observations which we look upon as fundamental. 20 They have less bearing on the actually comic than on the field within which it must be sought.

("Laughter: An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic")

Question 13 13.

In which sentence is the author's purpose for writing clearest?

Answers:
Use this material to answer questions #12 through #14

1 What does laughter mean? 2 What is the basal element in the laughable? 3 What common ground can we find between the grimace of a merry-andrew, a play upon words, an equivocal situation in a burlesque and a scene of high comedy? 4 What method of distillation will yield us invariably the same essence from which so many different products borrow either their obtrusive odour or their delicate perfume? 5 The greatest of thinkers, from Aristotle downwards, have tackled this little problem, which has a knack of baffling every effort, of slipping away and escaping only to bob up again, a pert challenge flung at philosophic speculation. 6 Our excuse for attacking the problem in our turn must lie in the fact that we shall not aim at imprisoning the comic spirit within a definition. 7 We regard it, above all, as a living thing. 8 However trivial it may be, we shall treat it with the respect due to life. 9 We shall confine ourselves to watching it grow and expand. 10 Passing by imperceptible gradations from one form to another, it will be seen to achieve the strangest metamorphoses. 11 We shall disdain nothing we have seen. 12 Maybe we may gain from this prolonged contact, for the matter of that, something more flexible than an abstract definition,-a practical, intimate acquaintance, such as springs from a long companionship. 13 And maybe we may also find that, unintentionally, we have made an acquaintance that is useful. 14 For the comic spirit has a logic of its own, even in its wildest eccentricities. 15 It has a method in its madness. 16 It dreams, I admit, but it conjures up, in its dreams, visions that are at once accepted and understood by the whole of a social group. 17 Can it then fail to throw light for us on the way that human imagination works, and more particularly social, collective, and popular imagination? 18 Begotten of real life and akin to art, should it not also have something of its own to tell us about art and life?

19 At the outset we shall put forward three observations which we look upon as fundamental. 20 They have less bearing on the actually comic than on the field within which it must be sought.

("Laughter: An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic")

Question 14 14.

In sentence 7, what does the pronoun it refer to?

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Question 15 15.

A population that is experiencing a rapid drop in mortality rates while fertility rates are high is in what stage of demographic transition?

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CSET Multiple Subjects Subtest I (101) | Study Guide & Practice Test Final Free Practice Test Instructions

Choose your answer to the question and click 'Continue' to see how you did. Then click 'Next Question' to answer the next question. When you have completed the free practice test, click 'View Results' to see your results. Good luck!

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