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FSA - Grade 6 ELA: Test Prep & Practice Final Exam

Free Practice Test Instructions:

Choose your answer to the question and click 'Continue' to see how you did. Then click 'Next Question' to answer the next question. When you have completed the free practice test, click 'View Results' to see your results. Good luck!

Question 1 1. Which of the following pieces of figurative language means that someone has been fired?

Question 2 2. Which of the following is NOT considered an example of informational text?

Question 3 3. Which of the following story types is characterized by animals that are featured as main characters and serves to teach a lesson?

Question 4 4. Which of the following meters in a poem contains five beats?

Use this material to answer questions #5 through #6

There was a Young Lady of Norway,

Who casually sat in a doorway;

When the door squeezed her flat, she exclaimed, ''What of that?''

This courageous Young Lady of Norway.


There was an Old Man of Apulia,

Whose conduct was very peculiar;

He fed twenty sons upon nothing but buns,

That whimsical Man of Apulia.


There was an Old Man of Quebec,--

A beetle ran over his neck;

But he cried, ''With a needle I'll slay you, O beadle!''

That angry Old Man of Quebec.


There was a Young Lady of Bute,

Who played on a silver-gilt flute;

She played several jigs to her Uncle's white Pigs:

That amusing Young Lady of Bute.


There was an Old Person of Philoe,

Whose conduct was scroobious and wily;

He rushed up a Palm when the weather was calm,

And observed all the ruins of Philoe.

Question 5 5. In the given poem, how many feet are in the rhyme meter?

Use this material to answer questions #5 through #6

There was a Young Lady of Norway,

Who casually sat in a doorway;

When the door squeezed her flat, she exclaimed, ''What of that?''

This courageous Young Lady of Norway.


There was an Old Man of Apulia,

Whose conduct was very peculiar;

He fed twenty sons upon nothing but buns,

That whimsical Man of Apulia.


There was an Old Man of Quebec,--

A beetle ran over his neck;

But he cried, ''With a needle I'll slay you, O beadle!''

That angry Old Man of Quebec.


There was a Young Lady of Bute,

Who played on a silver-gilt flute;

She played several jigs to her Uncle's white Pigs:

That amusing Young Lady of Bute.


There was an Old Person of Philoe,

Whose conduct was scroobious and wily;

He rushed up a Palm when the weather was calm,

And observed all the ruins of Philoe.

Question 6 6. In the text, what is the meaning of the word ''wily?''

Use this material to answer questions #7 through #9

''My child, you are far too young to think of falling in love. Besides,

what do you know of this young man? You don't even know his name. The

whole thing is most inconvenient, and really, when James is going away

to Australia, and I have so much to think of, I must say that you

should have shown more consideration. However, as I said before, if he

is rich ...''


''Ah! Mother, Mother, let me be happy!''


Mrs. Vane glanced at her, and with one of those false theatrical

gestures that so often become a mode of second nature to a

stage-player, clasped her in her arms. At this moment, the door opened

and a young lad with rough brown hair came into the room. He was

thick-set of figure, and his hands and feet were large and somewhat

clumsy in movement. He was not so finely bred as his sister. One

would hardly have guessed the close relationship that existed between

them. Mrs. Vane fixed her eyes on him and intensified her smile. She

mentally elevated her son to the dignity of an audience. She felt sure

that the tableau was interesting.


''You might keep some of your kisses for me, Sibyl, I think,'' said the

lad with a good-natured grumble.


''Ah! but you don't like being kissed, Jim,'' she cried. ''You are a

dreadful old bear.'' And she ran across the room and hugged him.


James Vane looked into his sister's face with tenderness. ''I want you

to come out with me for a walk, Sibyl. I don't suppose I shall ever

see this horrid London again. I am sure I don't want to.''


''My son, don't say such dreadful things,'' murmured Mrs. Vane, taking up

a tawdry theatrical dress, with a sigh, and beginning to patch it. She

felt a little disappointed that he had not joined the group. It would

have increased the theatrical picturesqueness of the situation.

Question 7 7. In the passage, which is a synonym of the word ''intensified?''

Use this material to answer questions #7 through #9

''My child, you are far too young to think of falling in love. Besides,

what do you know of this young man? You don't even know his name. The

whole thing is most inconvenient, and really, when James is going away

to Australia, and I have so much to think of, I must say that you

should have shown more consideration. However, as I said before, if he

is rich ...''


''Ah! Mother, Mother, let me be happy!''


Mrs. Vane glanced at her, and with one of those false theatrical

gestures that so often become a mode of second nature to a

stage-player, clasped her in her arms. At this moment, the door opened

and a young lad with rough brown hair came into the room. He was

thick-set of figure, and his hands and feet were large and somewhat

clumsy in movement. He was not so finely bred as his sister. One

would hardly have guessed the close relationship that existed between

them. Mrs. Vane fixed her eyes on him and intensified her smile. She

mentally elevated her son to the dignity of an audience. She felt sure

that the tableau was interesting.


''You might keep some of your kisses for me, Sibyl, I think,'' said the

lad with a good-natured grumble.


''Ah! but you don't like being kissed, Jim,'' she cried. ''You are a

dreadful old bear.'' And she ran across the room and hugged him.


James Vane looked into his sister's face with tenderness. ''I want you

to come out with me for a walk, Sibyl. I don't suppose I shall ever

see this horrid London again. I am sure I don't want to.''


''My son, don't say such dreadful things,'' murmured Mrs. Vane, taking up

a tawdry theatrical dress, with a sigh, and beginning to patch it. She

felt a little disappointed that he had not joined the group. It would

have increased the theatrical picturesqueness of the situation.

Question 8 8. Why does the author utilize the word ''theatrical'' in the story?

Use this material to answer questions #7 through #9

''My child, you are far too young to think of falling in love. Besides,

what do you know of this young man? You don't even know his name. The

whole thing is most inconvenient, and really, when James is going away

to Australia, and I have so much to think of, I must say that you

should have shown more consideration. However, as I said before, if he

is rich ...''


''Ah! Mother, Mother, let me be happy!''


Mrs. Vane glanced at her, and with one of those false theatrical

gestures that so often become a mode of second nature to a

stage-player, clasped her in her arms. At this moment, the door opened

and a young lad with rough brown hair came into the room. He was

thick-set of figure, and his hands and feet were large and somewhat

clumsy in movement. He was not so finely bred as his sister. One

would hardly have guessed the close relationship that existed between

them. Mrs. Vane fixed her eyes on him and intensified her smile. She

mentally elevated her son to the dignity of an audience. She felt sure

that the tableau was interesting.


''You might keep some of your kisses for me, Sibyl, I think,'' said the

lad with a good-natured grumble.


''Ah! but you don't like being kissed, Jim,'' she cried. ''You are a

dreadful old bear.'' And she ran across the room and hugged him.


James Vane looked into his sister's face with tenderness. ''I want you

to come out with me for a walk, Sibyl. I don't suppose I shall ever

see this horrid London again. I am sure I don't want to.''


''My son, don't say such dreadful things,'' murmured Mrs. Vane, taking up

a tawdry theatrical dress, with a sigh, and beginning to patch it. She

felt a little disappointed that he had not joined the group. It would

have increased the theatrical picturesqueness of the situation.

Question 9 9. Why might someone not realize the relationship between James and his sister?

Question 10 10. Which of the following are points in an argument that are unsupported?

Question 11 11. Which of the following types of foreshadowing occurs when a character predicts what is going to happen in the future?

Question 12 12. Of the following points of view, which one showcases a narrator's knowledge of one person's internal thoughts and feelings?

Question 13 13.

In the sentence below, which missing word is correct?


I think _____ going to love taking classes at the university.

Question 14 14. Which of the following is NOT considered a singular pronoun?

Question 15 15. Which of the following may be necessary to include before sharing a list within a sentence?

Tell us about yourself

Are you a student or a teacher?

I am a student I am a teacher

FSA - Grade 6 ELA: Test Prep & Practice Final Free Practice Test Instructions

Choose your answer to the question and click 'Continue' to see how you did. Then click 'Next Question' to answer the next question. When you have completed the free practice test, click 'View Results' to see your results. Good luck!

FSA - Grade 6 ELA: Test Prep & Practice  /  FSA Prep
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