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FTCE General Knowledge Test (GK) (827): Reading Subtest Practice & Study Guide Final Exam

Free Practice Test Instructions:

Choose your answer to the question and click 'Continue' to see how you did. Then click 'Next Question' to answer the next question. When you have completed the free practice test, click 'View Results' to see your results. Good luck!

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #4

'I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud'

BY WILLIAM WORDSWORTH


I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.


Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.


The waves beside them danced; but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed--and gazed--but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:


For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils.

Question 1 1. When Wordsworth wants to feel happy, he remembers his day of wandering. This is an example of _____.

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #4

'I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud'

BY WILLIAM WORDSWORTH


I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.


Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.


The waves beside them danced; but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed--and gazed--but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:


For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils.

Question 2 2. As he sees them on the hills, what does Wordsworth compare the daffodils to?

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #4

'I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud'

BY WILLIAM WORDSWORTH


I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.


Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.


The waves beside them danced; but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed--and gazed--but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:


For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils.

Question 3 3. Wordsworth's use of _____ allows readers to visualize the poet's afternoon.

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #4

'I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud'

BY WILLIAM WORDSWORTH


I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.


Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.


The waves beside them danced; but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed--and gazed--but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:


For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils.

Question 4 4. What point of view is used in 'I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud'?

Use this material to answer questions #5 through #8

'The Boston Tea Party, 1773'


Victory in the French and Indian War was costly for the British. At the war's conclusion in 1763, King George III and his government looked to taxing the American colonies as a way of recouping their war costs. They were also looking for ways to re-establish control over the colonial governments that had become increasingly independent while the Crown was distracted by the war. Royal ineptitude compounded the problem - it was the Crown's attempt to tax tea that spurred the colonists to action and laid the groundwork for the American Revolution.


The colonies refused to pay the levies required by the Townsend Acts, claiming they had no obligation to pay taxes imposed by a Parliament in which they had no representation. In response, Parliament retracted the taxes with the exception of a duty on tea - a demonstration of Parliament's ability and right to tax the colonies. In May 1773, Parliament gave the struggling East India Company a monopoly on the importation of tea to America. Additionally, Parliament reduced the duty the colonies would have to pay for the imported tea. The Americans would now get their tea at a cheaper price than ever before. However, if the colonies paid the duty tax on the imported tea they would be acknowledging Parliament's right to tax them. Tea was a staple of colonial life - it was assumed that the colonists would rather pay the tax than deny themselves the pleasure of a cup of tea.


The colonists were not fooled by Parliament's ploy. When the East India Company sent shipments of tea to Philadelphia and New York the ships were not allowed to land. In Charleston the tea-laden ships were permitted to dock but their cargo was consigned to a warehouse where it remained for three years until it was sold by patriots in order to help finance the revolution.


In Boston, the arrival of three tea ships ignited a furious reaction. The crisis came to a head on December 16, 1773, when as many as 7,000 agitated locals milled about the wharf where the ships were docked. A mass meeting at the Old South Meeting House that morning resolved that the tea ships should leave the harbor without payment of any duty. It was now early evening and a group of about 200 men, some disguised as Indians, assembled on a nearby hill. Whopping war chants, the crowd marched two-by-two to the wharf, descended upon the three ships and dumped their offending cargo of tea into the harbor waters.


Most colonists applauded the action, while the reaction in London was swift and vehement. In March 1774, Parliament passed the Intolerable Acts, which among other measures closed the Port of Boston. The fuse that led directly to the explosion of American independence was lit.

Question 5 5. The story of the Boston Tea Party is an example of what kind of text?

Use this material to answer questions #5 through #8

'The Boston Tea Party, 1773'


Victory in the French and Indian War was costly for the British. At the war's conclusion in 1763, King George III and his government looked to taxing the American colonies as a way of recouping their war costs. They were also looking for ways to re-establish control over the colonial governments that had become increasingly independent while the Crown was distracted by the war. Royal ineptitude compounded the problem - it was the Crown's attempt to tax tea that spurred the colonists to action and laid the groundwork for the American Revolution.


The colonies refused to pay the levies required by the Townsend Acts, claiming they had no obligation to pay taxes imposed by a Parliament in which they had no representation. In response, Parliament retracted the taxes with the exception of a duty on tea - a demonstration of Parliament's ability and right to tax the colonies. In May 1773, Parliament gave the struggling East India Company a monopoly on the importation of tea to America. Additionally, Parliament reduced the duty the colonies would have to pay for the imported tea. The Americans would now get their tea at a cheaper price than ever before. However, if the colonies paid the duty tax on the imported tea they would be acknowledging Parliament's right to tax them. Tea was a staple of colonial life - it was assumed that the colonists would rather pay the tax than deny themselves the pleasure of a cup of tea.


The colonists were not fooled by Parliament's ploy. When the East India Company sent shipments of tea to Philadelphia and New York the ships were not allowed to land. In Charleston the tea-laden ships were permitted to dock but their cargo was consigned to a warehouse where it remained for three years until it was sold by patriots in order to help finance the revolution.


In Boston, the arrival of three tea ships ignited a furious reaction. The crisis came to a head on December 16, 1773, when as many as 7,000 agitated locals milled about the wharf where the ships were docked. A mass meeting at the Old South Meeting House that morning resolved that the tea ships should leave the harbor without payment of any duty. It was now early evening and a group of about 200 men, some disguised as Indians, assembled on a nearby hill. Whopping war chants, the crowd marched two-by-two to the wharf, descended upon the three ships and dumped their offending cargo of tea into the harbor waters.


Most colonists applauded the action, while the reaction in London was swift and vehement. In March 1774, Parliament passed the Intolerable Acts, which among other measures closed the Port of Boston. The fuse that led directly to the explosion of American independence was lit.

Question 6 6. The Boston Tea Party led to the beginning of which war?

Use this material to answer questions #5 through #8

'The Boston Tea Party, 1773'


Victory in the French and Indian War was costly for the British. At the war's conclusion in 1763, King George III and his government looked to taxing the American colonies as a way of recouping their war costs. They were also looking for ways to re-establish control over the colonial governments that had become increasingly independent while the Crown was distracted by the war. Royal ineptitude compounded the problem - it was the Crown's attempt to tax tea that spurred the colonists to action and laid the groundwork for the American Revolution.


The colonies refused to pay the levies required by the Townsend Acts, claiming they had no obligation to pay taxes imposed by a Parliament in which they had no representation. In response, Parliament retracted the taxes with the exception of a duty on tea - a demonstration of Parliament's ability and right to tax the colonies. In May 1773, Parliament gave the struggling East India Company a monopoly on the importation of tea to America. Additionally, Parliament reduced the duty the colonies would have to pay for the imported tea. The Americans would now get their tea at a cheaper price than ever before. However, if the colonies paid the duty tax on the imported tea they would be acknowledging Parliament's right to tax them. Tea was a staple of colonial life - it was assumed that the colonists would rather pay the tax than deny themselves the pleasure of a cup of tea.


The colonists were not fooled by Parliament's ploy. When the East India Company sent shipments of tea to Philadelphia and New York the ships were not allowed to land. In Charleston the tea-laden ships were permitted to dock but their cargo was consigned to a warehouse where it remained for three years until it was sold by patriots in order to help finance the revolution.


In Boston, the arrival of three tea ships ignited a furious reaction. The crisis came to a head on December 16, 1773, when as many as 7,000 agitated locals milled about the wharf where the ships were docked. A mass meeting at the Old South Meeting House that morning resolved that the tea ships should leave the harbor without payment of any duty. It was now early evening and a group of about 200 men, some disguised as Indians, assembled on a nearby hill. Whopping war chants, the crowd marched two-by-two to the wharf, descended upon the three ships and dumped their offending cargo of tea into the harbor waters.


Most colonists applauded the action, while the reaction in London was swift and vehement. In March 1774, Parliament passed the Intolerable Acts, which among other measures closed the Port of Boston. The fuse that led directly to the explosion of American independence was lit.

Question 7 7. The description of the Boston Tea Party conveys what type of mood?

Use this material to answer questions #5 through #8

'The Boston Tea Party, 1773'


Victory in the French and Indian War was costly for the British. At the war's conclusion in 1763, King George III and his government looked to taxing the American colonies as a way of recouping their war costs. They were also looking for ways to re-establish control over the colonial governments that had become increasingly independent while the Crown was distracted by the war. Royal ineptitude compounded the problem - it was the Crown's attempt to tax tea that spurred the colonists to action and laid the groundwork for the American Revolution.


The colonies refused to pay the levies required by the Townsend Acts, claiming they had no obligation to pay taxes imposed by a Parliament in which they had no representation. In response, Parliament retracted the taxes with the exception of a duty on tea - a demonstration of Parliament's ability and right to tax the colonies. In May 1773, Parliament gave the struggling East India Company a monopoly on the importation of tea to America. Additionally, Parliament reduced the duty the colonies would have to pay for the imported tea. The Americans would now get their tea at a cheaper price than ever before. However, if the colonies paid the duty tax on the imported tea they would be acknowledging Parliament's right to tax them. Tea was a staple of colonial life - it was assumed that the colonists would rather pay the tax than deny themselves the pleasure of a cup of tea.


The colonists were not fooled by Parliament's ploy. When the East India Company sent shipments of tea to Philadelphia and New York the ships were not allowed to land. In Charleston the tea-laden ships were permitted to dock but their cargo was consigned to a warehouse where it remained for three years until it was sold by patriots in order to help finance the revolution.


In Boston, the arrival of three tea ships ignited a furious reaction. The crisis came to a head on December 16, 1773, when as many as 7,000 agitated locals milled about the wharf where the ships were docked. A mass meeting at the Old South Meeting House that morning resolved that the tea ships should leave the harbor without payment of any duty. It was now early evening and a group of about 200 men, some disguised as Indians, assembled on a nearby hill. Whopping war chants, the crowd marched two-by-two to the wharf, descended upon the three ships and dumped their offending cargo of tea into the harbor waters.


Most colonists applauded the action, while the reaction in London was swift and vehement. In March 1774, Parliament passed the Intolerable Acts, which among other measures closed the Port of Boston. The fuse that led directly to the explosion of American independence was lit.

Question 8 8.

What is the relationship between these two sentences from the passage about the Boston Tea Party?


Sentence One: Tea was a staple of colonial life - it was assumed that the colonists would rather pay the tax than deny themselves the pleasure of a cup of tea.


Sentence Two: ... it was the Crown's attempt to tax tea that spurred the colonists to action and laid the groundwork for the American Revolution.

Use this material to answer questions #9 through #11

The urban revolution would have sweeping implications for European history. The clearest change was economic. Before the urban revolution, each lord's manor was designed for self-sufficiency. They made their own food, forged their own iron, and wove their own fabric. By trying to do everything, these feudal manors ended up doing everything rather poorly.


By contrast, as the European economy expanded, cities began to specialize and carve out their respective niches on the international market. University towns, like Paris and Bologna, became centers of science and scholarship. London, Genoa, Venice and Cologne became the long distance trade centers of their respective regions. And, manufacturing cities like Milan, Ghent and Bruges began laying the foundations for the large scale factories of the Industrial Revolution.


With specialization came sweeping advances as like-minded scholars, merchants and craftsmen worked together to explore new questions, open new markets and develop new products and tools. Cities became the intellectual hearts of their regions. With all these great minds together, intellectual experimentation expanded at a rate not seen in Europe since classical Athens.


With the growth of cities and revitalization of trade, a wealthy middle class of merchants and craftsmen began to emerge. Though these profit-minded individuals at first received the scorn of both nobles and the clergy, they soon demonstrated the incredible potential of free enterprise. Some of these merchants became even richer than the aristocrats who scorned them. In certain Italian cities, it became almost impossible to distinguish a lord from a merchant, as both lived in town in opulent palaces.


These political shifts brought about new forms of government as cities experimented with ruling themselves. Even the Church, which for so long had condemned the behavior of this middle class as detestable, shameful and insatiably greedy, began to sing a new tune and acknowledge that the necessary evils of merchants and money-lenders were, perhaps, more necessary than evil.

Question 9 9. Identify the most accurate statement of the central idea of this passage.

Use this material to answer questions #9 through #11

The urban revolution would have sweeping implications for European history. The clearest change was economic. Before the urban revolution, each lord's manor was designed for self-sufficiency. They made their own food, forged their own iron, and wove their own fabric. By trying to do everything, these feudal manors ended up doing everything rather poorly.


By contrast, as the European economy expanded, cities began to specialize and carve out their respective niches on the international market. University towns, like Paris and Bologna, became centers of science and scholarship. London, Genoa, Venice and Cologne became the long distance trade centers of their respective regions. And, manufacturing cities like Milan, Ghent and Bruges began laying the foundations for the large scale factories of the Industrial Revolution.


With specialization came sweeping advances as like-minded scholars, merchants and craftsmen worked together to explore new questions, open new markets and develop new products and tools. Cities became the intellectual hearts of their regions. With all these great minds together, intellectual experimentation expanded at a rate not seen in Europe since classical Athens.


With the growth of cities and revitalization of trade, a wealthy middle class of merchants and craftsmen began to emerge. Though these profit-minded individuals at first received the scorn of both nobles and the clergy, they soon demonstrated the incredible potential of free enterprise. Some of these merchants became even richer than the aristocrats who scorned them. In certain Italian cities, it became almost impossible to distinguish a lord from a merchant, as both lived in town in opulent palaces.


These political shifts brought about new forms of government as cities experimented with ruling themselves. Even the Church, which for so long had condemned the behavior of this middle class as detestable, shameful and insatiably greedy, began to sing a new tune and acknowledge that the necessary evils of merchants and money-lenders were, perhaps, more necessary than evil.

Question 10 10. All of the following pieces of information relate to the urban revolution EXCEPT:

Use this material to answer questions #9 through #11

The urban revolution would have sweeping implications for European history. The clearest change was economic. Before the urban revolution, each lord's manor was designed for self-sufficiency. They made their own food, forged their own iron, and wove their own fabric. By trying to do everything, these feudal manors ended up doing everything rather poorly.


By contrast, as the European economy expanded, cities began to specialize and carve out their respective niches on the international market. University towns, like Paris and Bologna, became centers of science and scholarship. London, Genoa, Venice and Cologne became the long distance trade centers of their respective regions. And, manufacturing cities like Milan, Ghent and Bruges began laying the foundations for the large scale factories of the Industrial Revolution.


With specialization came sweeping advances as like-minded scholars, merchants and craftsmen worked together to explore new questions, open new markets and develop new products and tools. Cities became the intellectual hearts of their regions. With all these great minds together, intellectual experimentation expanded at a rate not seen in Europe since classical Athens.


With the growth of cities and revitalization of trade, a wealthy middle class of merchants and craftsmen began to emerge. Though these profit-minded individuals at first received the scorn of both nobles and the clergy, they soon demonstrated the incredible potential of free enterprise. Some of these merchants became even richer than the aristocrats who scorned them. In certain Italian cities, it became almost impossible to distinguish a lord from a merchant, as both lived in town in opulent palaces.


These political shifts brought about new forms of government as cities experimented with ruling themselves. Even the Church, which for so long had condemned the behavior of this middle class as detestable, shameful and insatiably greedy, began to sing a new tune and acknowledge that the necessary evils of merchants and money-lenders were, perhaps, more necessary than evil.

Question 11 11. The author's statement that the Church 'began to sing a new tune and acknowledge that the necessary evils of merchants' is:

Question 12 12.

Consider the following passage:

I felt a sudden chill, and looked to my left. In the distance I saw a tall figure, dimly lit by the street lights, running straight towards me. I turned and ran.

Which point of view is being used in the passage?

Question 13 13. In which point of view does the narrator describe the internal thoughts, feelings, and motivations of one character, usually the main character?

Question 14 14. A deductive pattern is more common than an inductive pattern in student writing because _____

Question 15 15. You are reading a text that's attempting to convince you chocolate cake is the best dessert. What is the purpose of the text?

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FTCE General Knowledge Test (GK) (827): Reading Subtest Practice & Study Guide Final Free Practice Test Instructions

Choose your answer to the question and click 'Continue' to see how you did. Then click 'Next Question' to answer the next question. When you have completed the free practice test, click 'View Results' to see your results. Good luck!

FTCE General Knowledge Test (GK) (827): Reading Subtest Practice & Study Guide  /  FTCE Courses
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