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FTCE General Knowledge Test (GK) (082): Study Guide & Prep Final Exam

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Question 1 1.

Choose the option that corrects an error in the bold portion(s). If no error exists, choose 'No change is necessary.~

The unconventionality of her dressing style and hairdos (A)provoke a kind of uneasiness in people that (B)is similar to a desire to (C)flee from the familiar.

Question 2 2.

Choose the option that corrects an error in the bold portion(s). If no error exists, choose 'No change is necessary.~

Stephen and John gulped down most of the pizza (A)we were sharing and then denied that (B)they had eaten more than (C)me.

Question 3 3. The randomly recorded percentage grades in a classroom were: 40, 40, 50, 71, 79, 84, 89, 89, 89, and 98. What is the average percentage grade (to the nearest whole) for the students recorded?

Use this material to answer questions #4 through #5

The Tortoise and the Hare

By Aesop


There once was a speedy hare who bragged about how fast he could run. Tired of hearing him boast, Slow and Steady, the tortoise, challenged him to a race. All the animals in the forest gathered to watch.


Hare ran down the road for a while and then and paused to rest. He looked back at Slow and Steady and cried out, 'How do you expect to win this race when you are walking along at your languorous pace?'


Hare stretched himself out alongside the road and fell asleep, thinking, 'There is plenty of time to relax.'


Slow and Steady walked and walked. He never, ever stopped until he came to the finish line.


The animals who were watching cheered so loudly for Tortoise, they woke up Hare.


Hare stretched and yawned and began to run again, but it was too late. Tortoise was over the line.


After that, Hare always reminded himself, 'Don't brag about your lightning pace, for Slow and Steady won the race!'

Question 4 4. What type of story is the tortoise and the hare?

Use this material to answer questions #4 through #5

The Tortoise and the Hare

By Aesop


There once was a speedy hare who bragged about how fast he could run. Tired of hearing him boast, Slow and Steady, the tortoise, challenged him to a race. All the animals in the forest gathered to watch.


Hare ran down the road for a while and then and paused to rest. He looked back at Slow and Steady and cried out, 'How do you expect to win this race when you are walking along at your languorous pace?'


Hare stretched himself out alongside the road and fell asleep, thinking, 'There is plenty of time to relax.'


Slow and Steady walked and walked. He never, ever stopped until he came to the finish line.


The animals who were watching cheered so loudly for Tortoise, they woke up Hare.


Hare stretched and yawned and began to run again, but it was too late. Tortoise was over the line.


After that, Hare always reminded himself, 'Don't brag about your lightning pace, for Slow and Steady won the race!'

Question 5 5. Why did the tortoise want to race the hare?

Use this material to answer questions #6 through #7

'I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud'

BY WILLIAM WORDSWORTH


I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.


Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.


The waves beside them danced; but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed--and gazed--but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:


For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils.

Question 6 6. When Wordsworth wants to feel happy, he remembers his day of wandering. This is an example of _____.

Use this material to answer questions #6 through #7

'I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud'

BY WILLIAM WORDSWORTH


I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.


Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.


The waves beside them danced; but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed--and gazed--but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:


For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils.

Question 7 7. As he sees them on the hills, what does Wordsworth compare the daffodils to?

Question 8 8. When looking for the frequency of a genetic trait in a population, which statistical measurement will be most useful?

Question 9 9. A child organized all of his candies in a bowl and counted them. There were 5 green, 4 yellow, 3 blue, 7 red, and 9 orange. When putting them into a bag, one falls onto the floor. What is the probability that it is yellow?

Question 10 10.

Choose the option that corrects an error in the bold portion(s). If no error exists, choose 'No change is necessary.~

Rachel suddenly had a strange (A)feeling, there were no more (B)walls, no boundaries, no (C)limits; there was just an open road to a boundless future.

Question 11 11.

Choose the option that corrects an error in the bold portion(s). If no error exists, choose 'No change is necessary.~

'Don't order the (A)coffee', said the (B)man suddenly. '(C)It's undrinkable.'

Question 12 12. Choose the correct word or phrase that provides parallel structure to the sentence: 'When John was a baby, his mother attended him so closely that she learned all of his subtle cues, picked up on his tiniest signals and _____ a unique connection with him.'

Question 13 13. Choose the best option in terms of sentence structure:

Use this material to answer questions #14 through #15

Albert Bandura's 'Bobo doll' study focused on children between the ages of three and six. Each child was shown a video of an adult hitting and yelling at an inflatable clown doll, called a 'Bobo doll.' The children were divided into three groups: One group saw the adult punished after showing aggression towards the Bobo doll, one group saw the adult rewarded after showing aggression, and one group saw the aggression but did not see the adult either punished or rewarded for the aggression.


After watching the video, the child was left alone with a Bobo doll in the room, though Bandura was secretly watching from another room. He counted how many aggressive acts - such as hitting, yelling, cursing, and punching - that each child engaged in. He found that the children who watched the adult get rewarded for showing aggression were more likely to show aggression themselves. He also found that, no matter which version of the video they saw, boys were more likely than girls to imitate the aggressive behavior of the adults in the video.


From this experiment, Bandura concluded that children learn behavior by watching the people around them. This is known as social learning theory. This makes sense to anyone who has ever been in the same room as a toddler: They imitate the speech and actions of the adults around them all the time.


Before the Bobo doll experiment, scientists had studied how rewards and punishment affect learning, but they had not studied how observing others getting rewards and punishment teaches us how to behave. In other words, before Bandura, psychologists knew that getting in trouble for hitting someone would teach a child not to hit, but they hadn't yet shown that kids can learn the same lesson by seeing another kid get in trouble for hitting someone.

Question 14 14. The organizational plan used by the author in paragraphs 1-2 can best be described as

Use this material to answer questions #14 through #15

Albert Bandura's 'Bobo doll' study focused on children between the ages of three and six. Each child was shown a video of an adult hitting and yelling at an inflatable clown doll, called a 'Bobo doll.' The children were divided into three groups: One group saw the adult punished after showing aggression towards the Bobo doll, one group saw the adult rewarded after showing aggression, and one group saw the aggression but did not see the adult either punished or rewarded for the aggression.


After watching the video, the child was left alone with a Bobo doll in the room, though Bandura was secretly watching from another room. He counted how many aggressive acts - such as hitting, yelling, cursing, and punching - that each child engaged in. He found that the children who watched the adult get rewarded for showing aggression were more likely to show aggression themselves. He also found that, no matter which version of the video they saw, boys were more likely than girls to imitate the aggressive behavior of the adults in the video.


From this experiment, Bandura concluded that children learn behavior by watching the people around them. This is known as social learning theory. This makes sense to anyone who has ever been in the same room as a toddler: They imitate the speech and actions of the adults around them all the time.


Before the Bobo doll experiment, scientists had studied how rewards and punishment affect learning, but they had not studied how observing others getting rewards and punishment teaches us how to behave. In other words, before Bandura, psychologists knew that getting in trouble for hitting someone would teach a child not to hit, but they hadn't yet shown that kids can learn the same lesson by seeing another kid get in trouble for hitting someone.

Question 15 15. From this passage one could infer that

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FTCE General Knowledge Test (GK) (082): Study Guide & Prep Final Free Practice Test Instructions

Choose your answer to the question and click 'Continue' to see how you did. Then click 'Next Question' to answer the next question. When you have completed the free practice test, click 'View Results' to see your results. Good luck!

FTCE General Knowledge Test (GK) (082): Study Guide & Prep  /  FTCE Courses
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