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GACE Program Admission Combined Test I, II & III (700): Practice & Study Guide Final Exam

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Question 1 1. The words: so, and, or, nor, and but all belong to this category of parts of speech:

Question 2 2. Which of the following contains more than one independent clause?

Question 3 3. ''It was amazing!'' Jenna shared after she, Miles, Bobby, James, and Justina went to the concert last weekend. Which of the following is the correct reason for the use of commas in this sentence?

Question 4 4. Which of the following is punctuated correctly?

Use this material to answer questions #5 through #9

All children, except one, grow up. They soon know that they will grow

up, and the way Wendy knew was this: one day when she was two years old

she was playing in a garden, and she plucked another flower and ran with

it to her mother. I suppose she must have looked rather delightful, for

Mrs. Darling put her hand to her heart and cried, ''Oh, why can't you

remain like this for ever!'' This was all that passed between them on the

subject, but henceforth Wendy knew that she must grow up. You always

know after you are two. Two is the beginning of the end.

Of course they lived at 14, and until Wendy came her mother was the

chief one. She was a lovely lady, with a romantic mind and such a sweet

mocking mouth. Her romantic mind was like the tiny boxes, one within the

other, that come from the puzzling East, however many you discover there

is always one more; and her sweet mocking mouth had one kiss on it that

Wendy could never get, though there it was, perfectly conspicuous in the

right-hand corner.

The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had been

boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved her,

and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling, who

took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of her,

except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box, and

in time he gave up trying for the kiss. Wendy thought Napoleon could

have got it, but I can picture him trying, and then going off in a

passion, slamming the door.

Mr. Darling used to boast to Wendy that her mother not only loved him

but respected him. He was one of those deep ones who know about stocks

and shares. Of course no one really knows, but he quite seemed to know,

and he often said stocks were up and shares were down in a way that

would have made any woman respect him.

Mrs. Darling was married in white, and at first she kept the books

perfectly, almost gleefully, as if it were a game, not so much as a

brussels sprout was missing; but by and by whole cauliflowers dropped

out, and instead of them there were pictures of babies without faces.

She drew them when she should have been totting up. They were Mrs.

Darling's guesses.

Wendy came first, then John, then Michael.

For a week or two after Wendy came it was doubtful whether they would be

able to keep her, as she was another mouth to feed. Mr. Darling was

frightfully proud of her, but he was very honourable, and he sat on the

edge of Mrs. Darling's bed, holding her hand and calculating expenses,

while she looked at him imploringly. She wanted to risk it, come what

might, but that was not his way; his way was with a pencil and a piece

of paper, and if she confused him with suggestions he had to begin at

the beginning again.

''Now don't interrupt,'' he would beg of her. ''I have one pound seventeen

here, and two and six at the office; I can cut off my coffee at the

office, say ten shillings, making two nine and six, with your eighteen

and three makes three nine seven, with five naught naught in my

cheque-book makes eight nine seven, - who is that moving? - eight nine

seven, dot and carry seven - don't speak, my own - and the pound you lent

to that man who came to the door - quiet, child - dot and carry

child - there, you've done it! - did I say nine nine seven? yes, I said

nine nine seven; the question is, can we try it for a year on nine nine

seven?''

''Of course we can, George,'' she cried. But she was prejudiced in Wendy's

favour, and he was really the grander character of the two.

''Remember mumps,'' he warned her almost threateningly, and off he went

again. ''Mumps one pound, that is what I have put down, but I daresay it

will be more like thirty shillings - don't speak - measles one five,

German measles half a guinea, makes two fifteen six - don't waggle your

finger - whooping-cough, say fifteen shillings'' - and so on it went, and

it added up differently each time; but at last Wendy just got through,

with mumps reduced to twelve six, and the two kinds of measles treated

as one.

There was the same excitement over John, and Michael had even a narrower

squeak; but both were kept, and soon you might have seen the three of

them going in a row to Miss Fulsom's Kindergarten school, accompanied by

their nurse.

Mrs. Darling loved to have everything just so, and Mr. Darling had a

passion for being exactly like his neighbours; so, of course, they had a

nurse. As they were poor, owing to the amount of milk the children

drank, this nurse was a prim Newfoundland dog, called Nana, who had

belonged to no one in particular until the Darlings engaged her. She had

always thought children important, however, and the Darlings had become

acquainted with her in Kensington Gardens, where she spent most of her

spare time peeping into perambulators, and was much hated by careless

nursemaids, whom she followed to their homes and complained of to their

mistresses. She proved to be quite a treasure of a nurse. How thorough

she was at bath-time; and up at any moment of the night if one of her

charges made the slightest cry. Of course her kennel was in the nursery.

She had a genius for knowing when a cough is a thing to have no patience

with and when it needs stocking round your throat. She believed to her

last day in old-fashioned remedies like rhubarb leaf, and made sounds of

contempt over all this new-fangled talk about germs, and so on. It was a

lesson in propriety to see her escorting the children to school, walking

sedately by their side when they were well behaved, and butting them

back into line if they strayed. On John's footer days she never once

forgot his sweater, and she usually carried an umbrella in her mouth in

case of rain. There is a room in the basement of Miss Fulsom's school

where the nurses wait. They sat on forms, while Nana lay on the floor,

but that was the only difference. They affected to ignore her as of an

inferior social status to themselves, and she despised their light talk.

She resented visits to the nursery from Mrs. Darling's friends, but if

they did come she first whipped off Michael's pinafore and put him into

the one with blue braiding, and smoothed out Wendy and made a dash at

John's hair.

No nursery could possibly have been conducted more correctly, and Mr.

Darling knew it, yet he sometimes wondered uneasily whether the

neighbours talked.

Question 5 5. In the passage, what is the concern mostly about over whether or not to keep Wendy?

Use this material to answer questions #5 through #9

All children, except one, grow up. They soon know that they will grow

up, and the way Wendy knew was this: one day when she was two years old

she was playing in a garden, and she plucked another flower and ran with

it to her mother. I suppose she must have looked rather delightful, for

Mrs. Darling put her hand to her heart and cried, ''Oh, why can't you

remain like this for ever!'' This was all that passed between them on the

subject, but henceforth Wendy knew that she must grow up. You always

know after you are two. Two is the beginning of the end.

Of course they lived at 14, and until Wendy came her mother was the

chief one. She was a lovely lady, with a romantic mind and such a sweet

mocking mouth. Her romantic mind was like the tiny boxes, one within the

other, that come from the puzzling East, however many you discover there

is always one more; and her sweet mocking mouth had one kiss on it that

Wendy could never get, though there it was, perfectly conspicuous in the

right-hand corner.

The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had been

boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved her,

and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling, who

took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of her,

except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box, and

in time he gave up trying for the kiss. Wendy thought Napoleon could

have got it, but I can picture him trying, and then going off in a

passion, slamming the door.

Mr. Darling used to boast to Wendy that her mother not only loved him

but respected him. He was one of those deep ones who know about stocks

and shares. Of course no one really knows, but he quite seemed to know,

and he often said stocks were up and shares were down in a way that

would have made any woman respect him.

Mrs. Darling was married in white, and at first she kept the books

perfectly, almost gleefully, as if it were a game, not so much as a

brussels sprout was missing; but by and by whole cauliflowers dropped

out, and instead of them there were pictures of babies without faces.

She drew them when she should have been totting up. They were Mrs.

Darling's guesses.

Wendy came first, then John, then Michael.

For a week or two after Wendy came it was doubtful whether they would be

able to keep her, as she was another mouth to feed. Mr. Darling was

frightfully proud of her, but he was very honourable, and he sat on the

edge of Mrs. Darling's bed, holding her hand and calculating expenses,

while she looked at him imploringly. She wanted to risk it, come what

might, but that was not his way; his way was with a pencil and a piece

of paper, and if she confused him with suggestions he had to begin at

the beginning again.

''Now don't interrupt,'' he would beg of her. ''I have one pound seventeen

here, and two and six at the office; I can cut off my coffee at the

office, say ten shillings, making two nine and six, with your eighteen

and three makes three nine seven, with five naught naught in my

cheque-book makes eight nine seven, - who is that moving? - eight nine

seven, dot and carry seven - don't speak, my own - and the pound you lent

to that man who came to the door - quiet, child - dot and carry

child - there, you've done it! - did I say nine nine seven? yes, I said

nine nine seven; the question is, can we try it for a year on nine nine

seven?''

''Of course we can, George,'' she cried. But she was prejudiced in Wendy's

favour, and he was really the grander character of the two.

''Remember mumps,'' he warned her almost threateningly, and off he went

again. ''Mumps one pound, that is what I have put down, but I daresay it

will be more like thirty shillings - don't speak - measles one five,

German measles half a guinea, makes two fifteen six - don't waggle your

finger - whooping-cough, say fifteen shillings'' - and so on it went, and

it added up differently each time; but at last Wendy just got through,

with mumps reduced to twelve six, and the two kinds of measles treated

as one.

There was the same excitement over John, and Michael had even a narrower

squeak; but both were kept, and soon you might have seen the three of

them going in a row to Miss Fulsom's Kindergarten school, accompanied by

their nurse.

Mrs. Darling loved to have everything just so, and Mr. Darling had a

passion for being exactly like his neighbours; so, of course, they had a

nurse. As they were poor, owing to the amount of milk the children

drank, this nurse was a prim Newfoundland dog, called Nana, who had

belonged to no one in particular until the Darlings engaged her. She had

always thought children important, however, and the Darlings had become

acquainted with her in Kensington Gardens, where she spent most of her

spare time peeping into perambulators, and was much hated by careless

nursemaids, whom she followed to their homes and complained of to their

mistresses. She proved to be quite a treasure of a nurse. How thorough

she was at bath-time; and up at any moment of the night if one of her

charges made the slightest cry. Of course her kennel was in the nursery.

She had a genius for knowing when a cough is a thing to have no patience

with and when it needs stocking round your throat. She believed to her

last day in old-fashioned remedies like rhubarb leaf, and made sounds of

contempt over all this new-fangled talk about germs, and so on. It was a

lesson in propriety to see her escorting the children to school, walking

sedately by their side when they were well behaved, and butting them

back into line if they strayed. On John's footer days she never once

forgot his sweater, and she usually carried an umbrella in her mouth in

case of rain. There is a room in the basement of Miss Fulsom's school

where the nurses wait. They sat on forms, while Nana lay on the floor,

but that was the only difference. They affected to ignore her as of an

inferior social status to themselves, and she despised their light talk.

She resented visits to the nursery from Mrs. Darling's friends, but if

they did come she first whipped off Michael's pinafore and put him into

the one with blue braiding, and smoothed out Wendy and made a dash at

John's hair.

No nursery could possibly have been conducted more correctly, and Mr.

Darling knew it, yet he sometimes wondered uneasily whether the

neighbours talked.

Question 6 6. In the passage it states, ''Two is the beginning of the end.'' Of which character is this referenced?

Use this material to answer questions #5 through #9

All children, except one, grow up. They soon know that they will grow

up, and the way Wendy knew was this: one day when she was two years old

she was playing in a garden, and she plucked another flower and ran with

it to her mother. I suppose she must have looked rather delightful, for

Mrs. Darling put her hand to her heart and cried, ''Oh, why can't you

remain like this for ever!'' This was all that passed between them on the

subject, but henceforth Wendy knew that she must grow up. You always

know after you are two. Two is the beginning of the end.

Of course they lived at 14, and until Wendy came her mother was the

chief one. She was a lovely lady, with a romantic mind and such a sweet

mocking mouth. Her romantic mind was like the tiny boxes, one within the

other, that come from the puzzling East, however many you discover there

is always one more; and her sweet mocking mouth had one kiss on it that

Wendy could never get, though there it was, perfectly conspicuous in the

right-hand corner.

The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had been

boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved her,

and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling, who

took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of her,

except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box, and

in time he gave up trying for the kiss. Wendy thought Napoleon could

have got it, but I can picture him trying, and then going off in a

passion, slamming the door.

Mr. Darling used to boast to Wendy that her mother not only loved him

but respected him. He was one of those deep ones who know about stocks

and shares. Of course no one really knows, but he quite seemed to know,

and he often said stocks were up and shares were down in a way that

would have made any woman respect him.

Mrs. Darling was married in white, and at first she kept the books

perfectly, almost gleefully, as if it were a game, not so much as a

brussels sprout was missing; but by and by whole cauliflowers dropped

out, and instead of them there were pictures of babies without faces.

She drew them when she should have been totting up. They were Mrs.

Darling's guesses.

Wendy came first, then John, then Michael.

For a week or two after Wendy came it was doubtful whether they would be

able to keep her, as she was another mouth to feed. Mr. Darling was

frightfully proud of her, but he was very honourable, and he sat on the

edge of Mrs. Darling's bed, holding her hand and calculating expenses,

while she looked at him imploringly. She wanted to risk it, come what

might, but that was not his way; his way was with a pencil and a piece

of paper, and if she confused him with suggestions he had to begin at

the beginning again.

''Now don't interrupt,'' he would beg of her. ''I have one pound seventeen

here, and two and six at the office; I can cut off my coffee at the

office, say ten shillings, making two nine and six, with your eighteen

and three makes three nine seven, with five naught naught in my

cheque-book makes eight nine seven, - who is that moving? - eight nine

seven, dot and carry seven - don't speak, my own - and the pound you lent

to that man who came to the door - quiet, child - dot and carry

child - there, you've done it! - did I say nine nine seven? yes, I said

nine nine seven; the question is, can we try it for a year on nine nine

seven?''

''Of course we can, George,'' she cried. But she was prejudiced in Wendy's

favour, and he was really the grander character of the two.

''Remember mumps,'' he warned her almost threateningly, and off he went

again. ''Mumps one pound, that is what I have put down, but I daresay it

will be more like thirty shillings - don't speak - measles one five,

German measles half a guinea, makes two fifteen six - don't waggle your

finger - whooping-cough, say fifteen shillings'' - and so on it went, and

it added up differently each time; but at last Wendy just got through,

with mumps reduced to twelve six, and the two kinds of measles treated

as one.

There was the same excitement over John, and Michael had even a narrower

squeak; but both were kept, and soon you might have seen the three of

them going in a row to Miss Fulsom's Kindergarten school, accompanied by

their nurse.

Mrs. Darling loved to have everything just so, and Mr. Darling had a

passion for being exactly like his neighbours; so, of course, they had a

nurse. As they were poor, owing to the amount of milk the children

drank, this nurse was a prim Newfoundland dog, called Nana, who had

belonged to no one in particular until the Darlings engaged her. She had

always thought children important, however, and the Darlings had become

acquainted with her in Kensington Gardens, where she spent most of her

spare time peeping into perambulators, and was much hated by careless

nursemaids, whom she followed to their homes and complained of to their

mistresses. She proved to be quite a treasure of a nurse. How thorough

she was at bath-time; and up at any moment of the night if one of her

charges made the slightest cry. Of course her kennel was in the nursery.

She had a genius for knowing when a cough is a thing to have no patience

with and when it needs stocking round your throat. She believed to her

last day in old-fashioned remedies like rhubarb leaf, and made sounds of

contempt over all this new-fangled talk about germs, and so on. It was a

lesson in propriety to see her escorting the children to school, walking

sedately by their side when they were well behaved, and butting them

back into line if they strayed. On John's footer days she never once

forgot his sweater, and she usually carried an umbrella in her mouth in

case of rain. There is a room in the basement of Miss Fulsom's school

where the nurses wait. They sat on forms, while Nana lay on the floor,

but that was the only difference. They affected to ignore her as of an

inferior social status to themselves, and she despised their light talk.

She resented visits to the nursery from Mrs. Darling's friends, but if

they did come she first whipped off Michael's pinafore and put him into

the one with blue braiding, and smoothed out Wendy and made a dash at

John's hair.

No nursery could possibly have been conducted more correctly, and Mr.

Darling knew it, yet he sometimes wondered uneasily whether the

neighbours talked.

Question 7 7. What is unique about the children's nurse?

Use this material to answer questions #5 through #9

All children, except one, grow up. They soon know that they will grow

up, and the way Wendy knew was this: one day when she was two years old

she was playing in a garden, and she plucked another flower and ran with

it to her mother. I suppose she must have looked rather delightful, for

Mrs. Darling put her hand to her heart and cried, ''Oh, why can't you

remain like this for ever!'' This was all that passed between them on the

subject, but henceforth Wendy knew that she must grow up. You always

know after you are two. Two is the beginning of the end.

Of course they lived at 14, and until Wendy came her mother was the

chief one. She was a lovely lady, with a romantic mind and such a sweet

mocking mouth. Her romantic mind was like the tiny boxes, one within the

other, that come from the puzzling East, however many you discover there

is always one more; and her sweet mocking mouth had one kiss on it that

Wendy could never get, though there it was, perfectly conspicuous in the

right-hand corner.

The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had been

boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved her,

and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling, who

took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of her,

except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box, and

in time he gave up trying for the kiss. Wendy thought Napoleon could

have got it, but I can picture him trying, and then going off in a

passion, slamming the door.

Mr. Darling used to boast to Wendy that her mother not only loved him

but respected him. He was one of those deep ones who know about stocks

and shares. Of course no one really knows, but he quite seemed to know,

and he often said stocks were up and shares were down in a way that

would have made any woman respect him.

Mrs. Darling was married in white, and at first she kept the books

perfectly, almost gleefully, as if it were a game, not so much as a

brussels sprout was missing; but by and by whole cauliflowers dropped

out, and instead of them there were pictures of babies without faces.

She drew them when she should have been totting up. They were Mrs.

Darling's guesses.

Wendy came first, then John, then Michael.

For a week or two after Wendy came it was doubtful whether they would be

able to keep her, as she was another mouth to feed. Mr. Darling was

frightfully proud of her, but he was very honourable, and he sat on the

edge of Mrs. Darling's bed, holding her hand and calculating expenses,

while she looked at him imploringly. She wanted to risk it, come what

might, but that was not his way; his way was with a pencil and a piece

of paper, and if she confused him with suggestions he had to begin at

the beginning again.

''Now don't interrupt,'' he would beg of her. ''I have one pound seventeen

here, and two and six at the office; I can cut off my coffee at the

office, say ten shillings, making two nine and six, with your eighteen

and three makes three nine seven, with five naught naught in my

cheque-book makes eight nine seven, - who is that moving? - eight nine

seven, dot and carry seven - don't speak, my own - and the pound you lent

to that man who came to the door - quiet, child - dot and carry

child - there, you've done it! - did I say nine nine seven? yes, I said

nine nine seven; the question is, can we try it for a year on nine nine

seven?''

''Of course we can, George,'' she cried. But she was prejudiced in Wendy's

favour, and he was really the grander character of the two.

''Remember mumps,'' he warned her almost threateningly, and off he went

again. ''Mumps one pound, that is what I have put down, but I daresay it

will be more like thirty shillings - don't speak - measles one five,

German measles half a guinea, makes two fifteen six - don't waggle your

finger - whooping-cough, say fifteen shillings'' - and so on it went, and

it added up differently each time; but at last Wendy just got through,

with mumps reduced to twelve six, and the two kinds of measles treated

as one.

There was the same excitement over John, and Michael had even a narrower

squeak; but both were kept, and soon you might have seen the three of

them going in a row to Miss Fulsom's Kindergarten school, accompanied by

their nurse.

Mrs. Darling loved to have everything just so, and Mr. Darling had a

passion for being exactly like his neighbours; so, of course, they had a

nurse. As they were poor, owing to the amount of milk the children

drank, this nurse was a prim Newfoundland dog, called Nana, who had

belonged to no one in particular until the Darlings engaged her. She had

always thought children important, however, and the Darlings had become

acquainted with her in Kensington Gardens, where she spent most of her

spare time peeping into perambulators, and was much hated by careless

nursemaids, whom she followed to their homes and complained of to their

mistresses. She proved to be quite a treasure of a nurse. How thorough

she was at bath-time; and up at any moment of the night if one of her

charges made the slightest cry. Of course her kennel was in the nursery.

She had a genius for knowing when a cough is a thing to have no patience

with and when it needs stocking round your throat. She believed to her

last day in old-fashioned remedies like rhubarb leaf, and made sounds of

contempt over all this new-fangled talk about germs, and so on. It was a

lesson in propriety to see her escorting the children to school, walking

sedately by their side when they were well behaved, and butting them

back into line if they strayed. On John's footer days she never once

forgot his sweater, and she usually carried an umbrella in her mouth in

case of rain. There is a room in the basement of Miss Fulsom's school

where the nurses wait. They sat on forms, while Nana lay on the floor,

but that was the only difference. They affected to ignore her as of an

inferior social status to themselves, and she despised their light talk.

She resented visits to the nursery from Mrs. Darling's friends, but if

they did come she first whipped off Michael's pinafore and put him into

the one with blue braiding, and smoothed out Wendy and made a dash at

John's hair.

No nursery could possibly have been conducted more correctly, and Mr.

Darling knew it, yet he sometimes wondered uneasily whether the

neighbours talked.

Question 8 8. How is this passage organized?

Use this material to answer questions #5 through #9

All children, except one, grow up. They soon know that they will grow

up, and the way Wendy knew was this: one day when she was two years old

she was playing in a garden, and she plucked another flower and ran with

it to her mother. I suppose she must have looked rather delightful, for

Mrs. Darling put her hand to her heart and cried, ''Oh, why can't you

remain like this for ever!'' This was all that passed between them on the

subject, but henceforth Wendy knew that she must grow up. You always

know after you are two. Two is the beginning of the end.

Of course they lived at 14, and until Wendy came her mother was the

chief one. She was a lovely lady, with a romantic mind and such a sweet

mocking mouth. Her romantic mind was like the tiny boxes, one within the

other, that come from the puzzling East, however many you discover there

is always one more; and her sweet mocking mouth had one kiss on it that

Wendy could never get, though there it was, perfectly conspicuous in the

right-hand corner.

The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had been

boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved her,

and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling, who

took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of her,

except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box, and

in time he gave up trying for the kiss. Wendy thought Napoleon could

have got it, but I can picture him trying, and then going off in a

passion, slamming the door.

Mr. Darling used to boast to Wendy that her mother not only loved him

but respected him. He was one of those deep ones who know about stocks

and shares. Of course no one really knows, but he quite seemed to know,

and he often said stocks were up and shares were down in a way that

would have made any woman respect him.

Mrs. Darling was married in white, and at first she kept the books

perfectly, almost gleefully, as if it were a game, not so much as a

brussels sprout was missing; but by and by whole cauliflowers dropped

out, and instead of them there were pictures of babies without faces.

She drew them when she should have been totting up. They were Mrs.

Darling's guesses.

Wendy came first, then John, then Michael.

For a week or two after Wendy came it was doubtful whether they would be

able to keep her, as she was another mouth to feed. Mr. Darling was

frightfully proud of her, but he was very honourable, and he sat on the

edge of Mrs. Darling's bed, holding her hand and calculating expenses,

while she looked at him imploringly. She wanted to risk it, come what

might, but that was not his way; his way was with a pencil and a piece

of paper, and if she confused him with suggestions he had to begin at

the beginning again.

''Now don't interrupt,'' he would beg of her. ''I have one pound seventeen

here, and two and six at the office; I can cut off my coffee at the

office, say ten shillings, making two nine and six, with your eighteen

and three makes three nine seven, with five naught naught in my

cheque-book makes eight nine seven, - who is that moving? - eight nine

seven, dot and carry seven - don't speak, my own - and the pound you lent

to that man who came to the door - quiet, child - dot and carry

child - there, you've done it! - did I say nine nine seven? yes, I said

nine nine seven; the question is, can we try it for a year on nine nine

seven?''

''Of course we can, George,'' she cried. But she was prejudiced in Wendy's

favour, and he was really the grander character of the two.

''Remember mumps,'' he warned her almost threateningly, and off he went

again. ''Mumps one pound, that is what I have put down, but I daresay it

will be more like thirty shillings - don't speak - measles one five,

German measles half a guinea, makes two fifteen six - don't waggle your

finger - whooping-cough, say fifteen shillings'' - and so on it went, and

it added up differently each time; but at last Wendy just got through,

with mumps reduced to twelve six, and the two kinds of measles treated

as one.

There was the same excitement over John, and Michael had even a narrower

squeak; but both were kept, and soon you might have seen the three of

them going in a row to Miss Fulsom's Kindergarten school, accompanied by

their nurse.

Mrs. Darling loved to have everything just so, and Mr. Darling had a

passion for being exactly like his neighbours; so, of course, they had a

nurse. As they were poor, owing to the amount of milk the children

drank, this nurse was a prim Newfoundland dog, called Nana, who had

belonged to no one in particular until the Darlings engaged her. She had

always thought children important, however, and the Darlings had become

acquainted with her in Kensington Gardens, where she spent most of her

spare time peeping into perambulators, and was much hated by careless

nursemaids, whom she followed to their homes and complained of to their

mistresses. She proved to be quite a treasure of a nurse. How thorough

she was at bath-time; and up at any moment of the night if one of her

charges made the slightest cry. Of course her kennel was in the nursery.

She had a genius for knowing when a cough is a thing to have no patience

with and when it needs stocking round your throat. She believed to her

last day in old-fashioned remedies like rhubarb leaf, and made sounds of

contempt over all this new-fangled talk about germs, and so on. It was a

lesson in propriety to see her escorting the children to school, walking

sedately by their side when they were well behaved, and butting them

back into line if they strayed. On John's footer days she never once

forgot his sweater, and she usually carried an umbrella in her mouth in

case of rain. There is a room in the basement of Miss Fulsom's school

where the nurses wait. They sat on forms, while Nana lay on the floor,

but that was the only difference. They affected to ignore her as of an

inferior social status to themselves, and she despised their light talk.

She resented visits to the nursery from Mrs. Darling's friends, but if

they did come she first whipped off Michael's pinafore and put him into

the one with blue braiding, and smoothed out Wendy and made a dash at

John's hair.

No nursery could possibly have been conducted more correctly, and Mr.

Darling knew it, yet he sometimes wondered uneasily whether the

neighbours talked.

Question 9 9. What does Mr. Darling worry about?

Question 10 10. Mikayla purchased 4 notebooks at $1.79 each and 12 pencils at $.36 each. The sales tax is 7%. What will Mikayala's total be?

Question 11 11.

What is the sum of the following amounts?

21.43, 76.18, 90.96

Question 12 12. Michael is replacing the flooring in his home office. The room is perfectly square and he has measured one side to discover that it is 14 feet in length. How many square feet will he need to cover?

Question 13 13. Riley needs to find the area of a right triangle. He knows that one side is 3 cm and the other side is 5 cm, but he does not know the length of the hypotenuse. What is the area of the triangle?

Question 14 14. The purpose of this type of writing is to explain, instruct, or give factual information, and is known as:

Question 15 15. Olivia has $22 in her wallet and needs a few things from the grocery store. She wants to purchase flour for $3.45, eggs for $2.98, butter for $4.02, chocolate chips for $4.98, and sugar for $3.57. She plans to estimate to determine if she will have enough money. What will the total cost be when she estimates to the nearest dollar?

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