GED Reasoning Through Language Arts Final Exam

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Use this material to answer questions #1 through #4

Read the following excerpt from ''Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'' and answer the following questions.

Josiah, my father, married young, and carried his wife with three

children into New England, about 1682. The conventicles having been

forbidden by law, and frequently disturbed, induced some considerable

men of his acquaintance to remove to that country, and he was

prevailed with to accompany them thither, where they expected to enjoy

their mode of religion with freedom. By the same wife he had four

children more born there, and by a second wife ten more, in all

seventeen; of which I remember thirteen sitting at one time at his

table, who all grew up to be men and women, and married; I was the

youngest son, and the youngest child but two, and was born in Boston,

New England. My mother, the second wife, was Abiah Folger,

daughter of Peter Folger, one of the first settlers of New England, of

whom honorable mention is made by Cotton Mather, in his church

history of that country, entitled _Magnalia Christi Americana_, as '_a

godly, learned Englishman_,' if I remember the words rightly. I have

heard that he wrote sundry small occasional pieces, but only one of

them was printed, which I saw now many years since. It was written in

1675, in the home-spun verse of that time and people, and addressed to

those then concerned in the government there. It was in favour of

liberty of conscience, and in behalf of the Baptists, Quakers, and

other sectaries that had been under persecution, ascribing the Indian

wars, and other distresses that had befallen the country, to that

persecution, as so many judgments of God to punish so heinous an

offense, and exhorting a repeal of those uncharitable laws. The whole

appeared to me as written with a good deal of decent plainness and

manly freedom. The six concluding lines I remember, though I have

forgotten the two first of the stanza; but the purport of them was,

that his censures proceeded from good-will, and, therefore, he would

be known to be the author.

'Because to be a libeller (says he)

I hate it with my heart;

From Sherburne town, where now I dwell

My name I do put here;

Without offense your real friend,

It is Peter Folgier.'

My elder brothers were all put apprentices to different trades. I was

put to the grammar-school at eight years of age, my father intending

to devote me, as the tithe of his sons, to the service of the

Church. My early readiness in learning to read (which must have been

very early, as I do not remember when I could not read), and the

opinion of all his friends, that I should certainly make a good

scholar, encouraged him in this purpose of his. My uncle Benjamin,

too, approved of it, and proposed to give me all his short-hand

volumes of sermons, I suppose as a stock to set up with, if I would

learn his character. I continued, however, at the grammar-school

not quite one year, though in that time I had risen gradually from the

middle of the class of that year to be the head of it, and farther was

removed into the next class above it, in order to go with that into

the third at the end of the year. But my father, in the meantime, from

a view of the expense of a college education, which having so large a

family he could not well afford, and the mean living many so educated

were afterwards able to obtain--reasons that he gave to his friends in

my hearing--altered his first intention, took me from the

grammar-school, and sent me to a school for writing and arithmetic,

kept by a then famous man, Mr. George Brownell, very successful in

his profession generally, and that by mild, encouraging methods. Under

him I acquired fair writing pretty soon, but I failed in the

arithmetic, and made no progress in it. At ten years old I was taken

home to assist my father in his business, which was that of a

tallow-chandler and sope-boiler; a business he was not bred to, but

had assumed on his arrival in New England, and on finding his dyeing

trade would not maintain his family, being in little request.

Accordingly, I was employed in cutting wick for the candles, filling

the dipping mould and the moulds for cast candles, attending the shop,

going of errands, etc.

I disliked the trade, and had a strong inclination for the sea, but my

father declared against it; however, living near the water, I was much

in and about it, learnt early to swim well, and to manage boats; and

when in a boat or canoe with other boys, I was commonly allowed to

govern, especially in any case of difficulty; and upon other occasions

I was generally a leader among the boys, and sometimes led them into

scrapes, of which I will mention one instance, as it shows an early

projecting public spirit, tho' not then justly conducted.

There was a salt-marsh that bounded part of the mill-pond, on the edge

of which, at high water, we used to stand to fish for minnows. By much

trampling, we had made it a mere quagmire. My proposal was to build a

wharf there fit for us to stand upon, and I showed my comrades a large

heap of stones, which were intended for a new house near the marsh,

and which would very well suit our purpose. Accordingly, in the

evening, when the workmen were gone, I assembled a number of my

playfellows, and working with them diligently like so many emmets,

sometimes two or three to a stone, we brought them all away and built

our little wharf. The next morning the workmen were surprised at

missing the stones, which were found in our wharf. Inquiry was made

after the removers; we were discovered and complained of; several of

us were corrected by our fathers; and, though I pleaded the usefulness

of the work, mine convinced me that nothing was useful which was not

honest.

I think you may like to know something of his person and character. He

had an excellent constitution of body, was of middle stature, but well

set, and very strong; he was ingenious, could draw prettily, was

skilled a little in music, and had a clear, pleasing voice, so that

when he played psalm tunes on his violin and sung withal, as he

sometimes did in an evening after the business of the day was over, it

was extremely agreeable to hear. He had a mechanical genius too, and,

on occasion, was very handy in the use of other tradesmen's tools; but

his great excellence lay in a sound understanding and solid judgment

in prudential matters, both in private and publick affairs. In the

latter, indeed, he was never employed, the numerous family he had to

educate and the straitness of his circumstances keeping him close to

his trade; but I remember well his being frequently visited by leading

people, who consulted him for his opinion in affairs of the town or of

the church he belonged to, and showed a good deal of respect for his

judgment and advice: he was also much consulted by private persons

about their affairs when any difficulty occurred, and frequently

chosen an arbitrator between contending parties. At his table he liked

to have, as often as he could, some sensible friend or neighbor to

converse with, and always took care to start some ingenious or useful

topic for discourse, which might tend to improve the minds of his

children. By this means he turned our attention to what was good,

just, and prudent in the conduct of life; and little or no notice was

ever taken of what related to the victuals on the table, whether it

was well or ill dressed, in or out of season, of good or bad flavor,

preferable or inferior to this or that other thing of the kind, so

that I was bro't up in such a perfect inattention to those matters as

to be quite indifferent what kind of food was set before me, and so

unobservant of it, that to this day if I am asked I can scarce tell a

few hours after dinner what I dined upon. This has been a convenience

to me in traveling, where my companions have been sometimes very

unhappy for want of a suitable gratification of their more delicate,

because better instructed, tastes and appetites.

Question 1 1. In the passage, why did Benjamin Franklin say he had gotten into trouble with the workmen?

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #4

Read the following excerpt from ''Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'' and answer the following questions.

Josiah, my father, married young, and carried his wife with three

children into New England, about 1682. The conventicles having been

forbidden by law, and frequently disturbed, induced some considerable

men of his acquaintance to remove to that country, and he was

prevailed with to accompany them thither, where they expected to enjoy

their mode of religion with freedom. By the same wife he had four

children more born there, and by a second wife ten more, in all

seventeen; of which I remember thirteen sitting at one time at his

table, who all grew up to be men and women, and married; I was the

youngest son, and the youngest child but two, and was born in Boston,

New England. My mother, the second wife, was Abiah Folger,

daughter of Peter Folger, one of the first settlers of New England, of

whom honorable mention is made by Cotton Mather, in his church

history of that country, entitled _Magnalia Christi Americana_, as '_a

godly, learned Englishman_,' if I remember the words rightly. I have

heard that he wrote sundry small occasional pieces, but only one of

them was printed, which I saw now many years since. It was written in

1675, in the home-spun verse of that time and people, and addressed to

those then concerned in the government there. It was in favour of

liberty of conscience, and in behalf of the Baptists, Quakers, and

other sectaries that had been under persecution, ascribing the Indian

wars, and other distresses that had befallen the country, to that

persecution, as so many judgments of God to punish so heinous an

offense, and exhorting a repeal of those uncharitable laws. The whole

appeared to me as written with a good deal of decent plainness and

manly freedom. The six concluding lines I remember, though I have

forgotten the two first of the stanza; but the purport of them was,

that his censures proceeded from good-will, and, therefore, he would

be known to be the author.

'Because to be a libeller (says he)

I hate it with my heart;

From Sherburne town, where now I dwell

My name I do put here;

Without offense your real friend,

It is Peter Folgier.'

My elder brothers were all put apprentices to different trades. I was

put to the grammar-school at eight years of age, my father intending

to devote me, as the tithe of his sons, to the service of the

Church. My early readiness in learning to read (which must have been

very early, as I do not remember when I could not read), and the

opinion of all his friends, that I should certainly make a good

scholar, encouraged him in this purpose of his. My uncle Benjamin,

too, approved of it, and proposed to give me all his short-hand

volumes of sermons, I suppose as a stock to set up with, if I would

learn his character. I continued, however, at the grammar-school

not quite one year, though in that time I had risen gradually from the

middle of the class of that year to be the head of it, and farther was

removed into the next class above it, in order to go with that into

the third at the end of the year. But my father, in the meantime, from

a view of the expense of a college education, which having so large a

family he could not well afford, and the mean living many so educated

were afterwards able to obtain--reasons that he gave to his friends in

my hearing--altered his first intention, took me from the

grammar-school, and sent me to a school for writing and arithmetic,

kept by a then famous man, Mr. George Brownell, very successful in

his profession generally, and that by mild, encouraging methods. Under

him I acquired fair writing pretty soon, but I failed in the

arithmetic, and made no progress in it. At ten years old I was taken

home to assist my father in his business, which was that of a

tallow-chandler and sope-boiler; a business he was not bred to, but

had assumed on his arrival in New England, and on finding his dyeing

trade would not maintain his family, being in little request.

Accordingly, I was employed in cutting wick for the candles, filling

the dipping mould and the moulds for cast candles, attending the shop,

going of errands, etc.

I disliked the trade, and had a strong inclination for the sea, but my

father declared against it; however, living near the water, I was much

in and about it, learnt early to swim well, and to manage boats; and

when in a boat or canoe with other boys, I was commonly allowed to

govern, especially in any case of difficulty; and upon other occasions

I was generally a leader among the boys, and sometimes led them into

scrapes, of which I will mention one instance, as it shows an early

projecting public spirit, tho' not then justly conducted.

There was a salt-marsh that bounded part of the mill-pond, on the edge

of which, at high water, we used to stand to fish for minnows. By much

trampling, we had made it a mere quagmire. My proposal was to build a

wharf there fit for us to stand upon, and I showed my comrades a large

heap of stones, which were intended for a new house near the marsh,

and which would very well suit our purpose. Accordingly, in the

evening, when the workmen were gone, I assembled a number of my

playfellows, and working with them diligently like so many emmets,

sometimes two or three to a stone, we brought them all away and built

our little wharf. The next morning the workmen were surprised at

missing the stones, which were found in our wharf. Inquiry was made

after the removers; we were discovered and complained of; several of

us were corrected by our fathers; and, though I pleaded the usefulness

of the work, mine convinced me that nothing was useful which was not

honest.

I think you may like to know something of his person and character. He

had an excellent constitution of body, was of middle stature, but well

set, and very strong; he was ingenious, could draw prettily, was

skilled a little in music, and had a clear, pleasing voice, so that

when he played psalm tunes on his violin and sung withal, as he

sometimes did in an evening after the business of the day was over, it

was extremely agreeable to hear. He had a mechanical genius too, and,

on occasion, was very handy in the use of other tradesmen's tools; but

his great excellence lay in a sound understanding and solid judgment

in prudential matters, both in private and publick affairs. In the

latter, indeed, he was never employed, the numerous family he had to

educate and the straitness of his circumstances keeping him close to

his trade; but I remember well his being frequently visited by leading

people, who consulted him for his opinion in affairs of the town or of

the church he belonged to, and showed a good deal of respect for his

judgment and advice: he was also much consulted by private persons

about their affairs when any difficulty occurred, and frequently

chosen an arbitrator between contending parties. At his table he liked

to have, as often as he could, some sensible friend or neighbor to

converse with, and always took care to start some ingenious or useful

topic for discourse, which might tend to improve the minds of his

children. By this means he turned our attention to what was good,

just, and prudent in the conduct of life; and little or no notice was

ever taken of what related to the victuals on the table, whether it

was well or ill dressed, in or out of season, of good or bad flavor,

preferable or inferior to this or that other thing of the kind, so

that I was bro't up in such a perfect inattention to those matters as

to be quite indifferent what kind of food was set before me, and so

unobservant of it, that to this day if I am asked I can scarce tell a

few hours after dinner what I dined upon. This has been a convenience

to me in traveling, where my companions have been sometimes very

unhappy for want of a suitable gratification of their more delicate,

because better instructed, tastes and appetites.

Question 2 2. When thinking of his trade, Franklin's father did not want him to be involved with:

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #4

Read the following excerpt from ''Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'' and answer the following questions.

Josiah, my father, married young, and carried his wife with three

children into New England, about 1682. The conventicles having been

forbidden by law, and frequently disturbed, induced some considerable

men of his acquaintance to remove to that country, and he was

prevailed with to accompany them thither, where they expected to enjoy

their mode of religion with freedom. By the same wife he had four

children more born there, and by a second wife ten more, in all

seventeen; of which I remember thirteen sitting at one time at his

table, who all grew up to be men and women, and married; I was the

youngest son, and the youngest child but two, and was born in Boston,

New England. My mother, the second wife, was Abiah Folger,

daughter of Peter Folger, one of the first settlers of New England, of

whom honorable mention is made by Cotton Mather, in his church

history of that country, entitled _Magnalia Christi Americana_, as '_a

godly, learned Englishman_,' if I remember the words rightly. I have

heard that he wrote sundry small occasional pieces, but only one of

them was printed, which I saw now many years since. It was written in

1675, in the home-spun verse of that time and people, and addressed to

those then concerned in the government there. It was in favour of

liberty of conscience, and in behalf of the Baptists, Quakers, and

other sectaries that had been under persecution, ascribing the Indian

wars, and other distresses that had befallen the country, to that

persecution, as so many judgments of God to punish so heinous an

offense, and exhorting a repeal of those uncharitable laws. The whole

appeared to me as written with a good deal of decent plainness and

manly freedom. The six concluding lines I remember, though I have

forgotten the two first of the stanza; but the purport of them was,

that his censures proceeded from good-will, and, therefore, he would

be known to be the author.

'Because to be a libeller (says he)

I hate it with my heart;

From Sherburne town, where now I dwell

My name I do put here;

Without offense your real friend,

It is Peter Folgier.'

My elder brothers were all put apprentices to different trades. I was

put to the grammar-school at eight years of age, my father intending

to devote me, as the tithe of his sons, to the service of the

Church. My early readiness in learning to read (which must have been

very early, as I do not remember when I could not read), and the

opinion of all his friends, that I should certainly make a good

scholar, encouraged him in this purpose of his. My uncle Benjamin,

too, approved of it, and proposed to give me all his short-hand

volumes of sermons, I suppose as a stock to set up with, if I would

learn his character. I continued, however, at the grammar-school

not quite one year, though in that time I had risen gradually from the

middle of the class of that year to be the head of it, and farther was

removed into the next class above it, in order to go with that into

the third at the end of the year. But my father, in the meantime, from

a view of the expense of a college education, which having so large a

family he could not well afford, and the mean living many so educated

were afterwards able to obtain--reasons that he gave to his friends in

my hearing--altered his first intention, took me from the

grammar-school, and sent me to a school for writing and arithmetic,

kept by a then famous man, Mr. George Brownell, very successful in

his profession generally, and that by mild, encouraging methods. Under

him I acquired fair writing pretty soon, but I failed in the

arithmetic, and made no progress in it. At ten years old I was taken

home to assist my father in his business, which was that of a

tallow-chandler and sope-boiler; a business he was not bred to, but

had assumed on his arrival in New England, and on finding his dyeing

trade would not maintain his family, being in little request.

Accordingly, I was employed in cutting wick for the candles, filling

the dipping mould and the moulds for cast candles, attending the shop,

going of errands, etc.

I disliked the trade, and had a strong inclination for the sea, but my

father declared against it; however, living near the water, I was much

in and about it, learnt early to swim well, and to manage boats; and

when in a boat or canoe with other boys, I was commonly allowed to

govern, especially in any case of difficulty; and upon other occasions

I was generally a leader among the boys, and sometimes led them into

scrapes, of which I will mention one instance, as it shows an early

projecting public spirit, tho' not then justly conducted.

There was a salt-marsh that bounded part of the mill-pond, on the edge

of which, at high water, we used to stand to fish for minnows. By much

trampling, we had made it a mere quagmire. My proposal was to build a

wharf there fit for us to stand upon, and I showed my comrades a large

heap of stones, which were intended for a new house near the marsh,

and which would very well suit our purpose. Accordingly, in the

evening, when the workmen were gone, I assembled a number of my

playfellows, and working with them diligently like so many emmets,

sometimes two or three to a stone, we brought them all away and built

our little wharf. The next morning the workmen were surprised at

missing the stones, which were found in our wharf. Inquiry was made

after the removers; we were discovered and complained of; several of

us were corrected by our fathers; and, though I pleaded the usefulness

of the work, mine convinced me that nothing was useful which was not

honest.

I think you may like to know something of his person and character. He

had an excellent constitution of body, was of middle stature, but well

set, and very strong; he was ingenious, could draw prettily, was

skilled a little in music, and had a clear, pleasing voice, so that

when he played psalm tunes on his violin and sung withal, as he

sometimes did in an evening after the business of the day was over, it

was extremely agreeable to hear. He had a mechanical genius too, and,

on occasion, was very handy in the use of other tradesmen's tools; but

his great excellence lay in a sound understanding and solid judgment

in prudential matters, both in private and publick affairs. In the

latter, indeed, he was never employed, the numerous family he had to

educate and the straitness of his circumstances keeping him close to

his trade; but I remember well his being frequently visited by leading

people, who consulted him for his opinion in affairs of the town or of

the church he belonged to, and showed a good deal of respect for his

judgment and advice: he was also much consulted by private persons

about their affairs when any difficulty occurred, and frequently

chosen an arbitrator between contending parties. At his table he liked

to have, as often as he could, some sensible friend or neighbor to

converse with, and always took care to start some ingenious or useful

topic for discourse, which might tend to improve the minds of his

children. By this means he turned our attention to what was good,

just, and prudent in the conduct of life; and little or no notice was

ever taken of what related to the victuals on the table, whether it

was well or ill dressed, in or out of season, of good or bad flavor,

preferable or inferior to this or that other thing of the kind, so

that I was bro't up in such a perfect inattention to those matters as

to be quite indifferent what kind of food was set before me, and so

unobservant of it, that to this day if I am asked I can scarce tell a

few hours after dinner what I dined upon. This has been a convenience

to me in traveling, where my companions have been sometimes very

unhappy for want of a suitable gratification of their more delicate,

because better instructed, tastes and appetites.

Question 3 3. Why did Benjamin Franklin begin assisting his father with his business?

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #4

Read the following excerpt from ''Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'' and answer the following questions.

Josiah, my father, married young, and carried his wife with three

children into New England, about 1682. The conventicles having been

forbidden by law, and frequently disturbed, induced some considerable

men of his acquaintance to remove to that country, and he was

prevailed with to accompany them thither, where they expected to enjoy

their mode of religion with freedom. By the same wife he had four

children more born there, and by a second wife ten more, in all

seventeen; of which I remember thirteen sitting at one time at his

table, who all grew up to be men and women, and married; I was the

youngest son, and the youngest child but two, and was born in Boston,

New England. My mother, the second wife, was Abiah Folger,

daughter of Peter Folger, one of the first settlers of New England, of

whom honorable mention is made by Cotton Mather, in his church

history of that country, entitled _Magnalia Christi Americana_, as '_a

godly, learned Englishman_,' if I remember the words rightly. I have

heard that he wrote sundry small occasional pieces, but only one of

them was printed, which I saw now many years since. It was written in

1675, in the home-spun verse of that time and people, and addressed to

those then concerned in the government there. It was in favour of

liberty of conscience, and in behalf of the Baptists, Quakers, and

other sectaries that had been under persecution, ascribing the Indian

wars, and other distresses that had befallen the country, to that

persecution, as so many judgments of God to punish so heinous an

offense, and exhorting a repeal of those uncharitable laws. The whole

appeared to me as written with a good deal of decent plainness and

manly freedom. The six concluding lines I remember, though I have

forgotten the two first of the stanza; but the purport of them was,

that his censures proceeded from good-will, and, therefore, he would

be known to be the author.

'Because to be a libeller (says he)

I hate it with my heart;

From Sherburne town, where now I dwell

My name I do put here;

Without offense your real friend,

It is Peter Folgier.'

My elder brothers were all put apprentices to different trades. I was

put to the grammar-school at eight years of age, my father intending

to devote me, as the tithe of his sons, to the service of the

Church. My early readiness in learning to read (which must have been

very early, as I do not remember when I could not read), and the

opinion of all his friends, that I should certainly make a good

scholar, encouraged him in this purpose of his. My uncle Benjamin,

too, approved of it, and proposed to give me all his short-hand

volumes of sermons, I suppose as a stock to set up with, if I would

learn his character. I continued, however, at the grammar-school

not quite one year, though in that time I had risen gradually from the

middle of the class of that year to be the head of it, and farther was

removed into the next class above it, in order to go with that into

the third at the end of the year. But my father, in the meantime, from

a view of the expense of a college education, which having so large a

family he could not well afford, and the mean living many so educated

were afterwards able to obtain--reasons that he gave to his friends in

my hearing--altered his first intention, took me from the

grammar-school, and sent me to a school for writing and arithmetic,

kept by a then famous man, Mr. George Brownell, very successful in

his profession generally, and that by mild, encouraging methods. Under

him I acquired fair writing pretty soon, but I failed in the

arithmetic, and made no progress in it. At ten years old I was taken

home to assist my father in his business, which was that of a

tallow-chandler and sope-boiler; a business he was not bred to, but

had assumed on his arrival in New England, and on finding his dyeing

trade would not maintain his family, being in little request.

Accordingly, I was employed in cutting wick for the candles, filling

the dipping mould and the moulds for cast candles, attending the shop,

going of errands, etc.

I disliked the trade, and had a strong inclination for the sea, but my

father declared against it; however, living near the water, I was much

in and about it, learnt early to swim well, and to manage boats; and

when in a boat or canoe with other boys, I was commonly allowed to

govern, especially in any case of difficulty; and upon other occasions

I was generally a leader among the boys, and sometimes led them into

scrapes, of which I will mention one instance, as it shows an early

projecting public spirit, tho' not then justly conducted.

There was a salt-marsh that bounded part of the mill-pond, on the edge

of which, at high water, we used to stand to fish for minnows. By much

trampling, we had made it a mere quagmire. My proposal was to build a

wharf there fit for us to stand upon, and I showed my comrades a large

heap of stones, which were intended for a new house near the marsh,

and which would very well suit our purpose. Accordingly, in the

evening, when the workmen were gone, I assembled a number of my

playfellows, and working with them diligently like so many emmets,

sometimes two or three to a stone, we brought them all away and built

our little wharf. The next morning the workmen were surprised at

missing the stones, which were found in our wharf. Inquiry was made

after the removers; we were discovered and complained of; several of

us were corrected by our fathers; and, though I pleaded the usefulness

of the work, mine convinced me that nothing was useful which was not

honest.

I think you may like to know something of his person and character. He

had an excellent constitution of body, was of middle stature, but well

set, and very strong; he was ingenious, could draw prettily, was

skilled a little in music, and had a clear, pleasing voice, so that

when he played psalm tunes on his violin and sung withal, as he

sometimes did in an evening after the business of the day was over, it

was extremely agreeable to hear. He had a mechanical genius too, and,

on occasion, was very handy in the use of other tradesmen's tools; but

his great excellence lay in a sound understanding and solid judgment

in prudential matters, both in private and publick affairs. In the

latter, indeed, he was never employed, the numerous family he had to

educate and the straitness of his circumstances keeping him close to

his trade; but I remember well his being frequently visited by leading

people, who consulted him for his opinion in affairs of the town or of

the church he belonged to, and showed a good deal of respect for his

judgment and advice: he was also much consulted by private persons

about their affairs when any difficulty occurred, and frequently

chosen an arbitrator between contending parties. At his table he liked

to have, as often as he could, some sensible friend or neighbor to

converse with, and always took care to start some ingenious or useful

topic for discourse, which might tend to improve the minds of his

children. By this means he turned our attention to what was good,

just, and prudent in the conduct of life; and little or no notice was

ever taken of what related to the victuals on the table, whether it

was well or ill dressed, in or out of season, of good or bad flavor,

preferable or inferior to this or that other thing of the kind, so

that I was bro't up in such a perfect inattention to those matters as

to be quite indifferent what kind of food was set before me, and so

unobservant of it, that to this day if I am asked I can scarce tell a

few hours after dinner what I dined upon. This has been a convenience

to me in traveling, where my companions have been sometimes very

unhappy for want of a suitable gratification of their more delicate,

because better instructed, tastes and appetites.

Question 4 4. Why did Benjamin's father originally want him to be devoted to the service of the church?

Use this material to answer questions #5 through #8

Read the following from Jack London's ''The Call of the Wild'' and answer the following questions.

Buck did not read the newspapers, or he would have known that trouble

was brewing, not alone for himself, but for every tide-water dog, strong

of muscle and with warm, long hair, from Puget Sound to San Diego.

Because men, groping in the Arctic darkness, had found a yellow metal,

and because steamship and transportation companies were booming the

find, thousands of men were rushing into the Northland. These men wanted

dogs, and the dogs they wanted were heavy dogs, with strong muscles by

which to toil, and furry coats to protect them from the frost.

Buck lived at a big house in the sun-kissed Santa Clara Valley. Judge

Miller's place, it was called. It stood back from the road, half hidden

among the trees, through which glimpses could be caught of the wide

cool veranda that ran around its four sides. The house was approached by

gravelled driveways which wound about through wide-spreading lawns and

under the interlacing boughs of tall poplars. At the rear things were on

even a more spacious scale than at the front. There were great stables,

where a dozen grooms and boys held forth, rows of vine-clad servants'

cottages, an endless and orderly array of outhouses, long grape arbors,

green pastures, orchards, and berry patches. Then there was the pumping

plant for the artesian well, and the big cement tank where Judge

Miller's boys took their morning plunge and kept cool in the hot

afternoon.

And over this great demesne Buck ruled. Here he was born, and here he

had lived the four years of his life. It was true, there were other

dogs, There could not but be other dogs on so vast a place, but they did

not count. They came and went, resided in the populous kennels, or lived

obscurely in the recesses of the house after the fashion of Toots, the

Japanese pug, or Ysabel, the Mexican hairless,--strange creatures that

rarely put nose out of doors or set foot to ground. On the other hand,

there were the fox terriers, a score of them at least, who yelped

fearful promises at Toots and Ysabel looking out of the windows at them

and protected by a legion of housemaids armed with brooms and mops.

But Buck was neither house-dog nor kennel-dog. The whole realm was his.

He plunged into the swimming tank or went hunting with the Judge's sons;

he escorted Mollie and Alice, the Judge's daughters, on long twilight

or early morning rambles; on wintry nights he lay at the Judge's feet

before the roaring library fire; he carried the Judge's grandsons on his

back, or rolled them in the grass, and guarded their footsteps through

wild adventures down to the fountain in the stable yard, and even

beyond, where the paddocks were, and the berry patches. Among the

terriers he stalked imperiously, and Toots and Ysabel he utterly

ignored, for he was king,--king over all creeping, crawling, flying

things of Judge Miller's place, humans included.

His father, Elmo, a huge St. Bernard, had been the Judge's inseparable

companion, and Buck bid fair to follow in the way of his father. He was

not so large,--he weighed only one hundred and forty pounds,--for his

mother, Shep, had been a Scotch shepherd dog. Nevertheless, one hundred

and forty pounds, to which was added the dignity that comes of good

living and universal respect, enabled him to carry himself in right

royal fashion. During the four years since his puppyhood he had lived

the life of a sated aristocrat; he had a fine pride in himself, was even

a trifle egotistical, as country gentlemen sometimes become because of

their insular situation. But he had saved himself by not becoming a mere

pampered house-dog. Hunting and kindred outdoor delights had kept down

the fat and hardened his muscles; and to him, as to the cold-tubbing

races, the love of water had been a tonic and a health preserver.

And this was the manner of dog Buck was in the fall of 1897, when the

Klondike strike dragged men from all the world into the frozen North.

But Buck did not read the newspapers, and he did not know that Manuel,

one of the gardener's helpers, was an undesirable acquaintance. Manuel

had one besetting sin. He loved to play Chinese lottery. Also, in his

gambling, he had one besetting weakness--faith in a system; and this

made his damnation certain. For to play a system requires money, while

the wages of a gardener's helper do not lap over the needs of a wife and

numerous progeny.

Question 5 5. In the excerpt, why were men traveling north?

Use this material to answer questions #5 through #8

Read the following from Jack London's ''The Call of the Wild'' and answer the following questions.

Buck did not read the newspapers, or he would have known that trouble

was brewing, not alone for himself, but for every tide-water dog, strong

of muscle and with warm, long hair, from Puget Sound to San Diego.

Because men, groping in the Arctic darkness, had found a yellow metal,

and because steamship and transportation companies were booming the

find, thousands of men were rushing into the Northland. These men wanted

dogs, and the dogs they wanted were heavy dogs, with strong muscles by

which to toil, and furry coats to protect them from the frost.

Buck lived at a big house in the sun-kissed Santa Clara Valley. Judge

Miller's place, it was called. It stood back from the road, half hidden

among the trees, through which glimpses could be caught of the wide

cool veranda that ran around its four sides. The house was approached by

gravelled driveways which wound about through wide-spreading lawns and

under the interlacing boughs of tall poplars. At the rear things were on

even a more spacious scale than at the front. There were great stables,

where a dozen grooms and boys held forth, rows of vine-clad servants'

cottages, an endless and orderly array of outhouses, long grape arbors,

green pastures, orchards, and berry patches. Then there was the pumping

plant for the artesian well, and the big cement tank where Judge

Miller's boys took their morning plunge and kept cool in the hot

afternoon.

And over this great demesne Buck ruled. Here he was born, and here he

had lived the four years of his life. It was true, there were other

dogs, There could not but be other dogs on so vast a place, but they did

not count. They came and went, resided in the populous kennels, or lived

obscurely in the recesses of the house after the fashion of Toots, the

Japanese pug, or Ysabel, the Mexican hairless,--strange creatures that

rarely put nose out of doors or set foot to ground. On the other hand,

there were the fox terriers, a score of them at least, who yelped

fearful promises at Toots and Ysabel looking out of the windows at them

and protected by a legion of housemaids armed with brooms and mops.

But Buck was neither house-dog nor kennel-dog. The whole realm was his.

He plunged into the swimming tank or went hunting with the Judge's sons;

he escorted Mollie and Alice, the Judge's daughters, on long twilight

or early morning rambles; on wintry nights he lay at the Judge's feet

before the roaring library fire; he carried the Judge's grandsons on his

back, or rolled them in the grass, and guarded their footsteps through

wild adventures down to the fountain in the stable yard, and even

beyond, where the paddocks were, and the berry patches. Among the

terriers he stalked imperiously, and Toots and Ysabel he utterly

ignored, for he was king,--king over all creeping, crawling, flying

things of Judge Miller's place, humans included.

His father, Elmo, a huge St. Bernard, had been the Judge's inseparable

companion, and Buck bid fair to follow in the way of his father. He was

not so large,--he weighed only one hundred and forty pounds,--for his

mother, Shep, had been a Scotch shepherd dog. Nevertheless, one hundred

and forty pounds, to which was added the dignity that comes of good

living and universal respect, enabled him to carry himself in right

royal fashion. During the four years since his puppyhood he had lived

the life of a sated aristocrat; he had a fine pride in himself, was even

a trifle egotistical, as country gentlemen sometimes become because of

their insular situation. But he had saved himself by not becoming a mere

pampered house-dog. Hunting and kindred outdoor delights had kept down

the fat and hardened his muscles; and to him, as to the cold-tubbing

races, the love of water had been a tonic and a health preserver.

And this was the manner of dog Buck was in the fall of 1897, when the

Klondike strike dragged men from all the world into the frozen North.

But Buck did not read the newspapers, and he did not know that Manuel,

one of the gardener's helpers, was an undesirable acquaintance. Manuel

had one besetting sin. He loved to play Chinese lottery. Also, in his

gambling, he had one besetting weakness--faith in a system; and this

made his damnation certain. For to play a system requires money, while

the wages of a gardener's helper do not lap over the needs of a wife and

numerous progeny.

Question 6 6. Which of the following choices shows evidence that Judge Miler's place was spacious?

Use this material to answer questions #5 through #8

Read the following from Jack London's ''The Call of the Wild'' and answer the following questions.

Buck did not read the newspapers, or he would have known that trouble

was brewing, not alone for himself, but for every tide-water dog, strong

of muscle and with warm, long hair, from Puget Sound to San Diego.

Because men, groping in the Arctic darkness, had found a yellow metal,

and because steamship and transportation companies were booming the

find, thousands of men were rushing into the Northland. These men wanted

dogs, and the dogs they wanted were heavy dogs, with strong muscles by

which to toil, and furry coats to protect them from the frost.

Buck lived at a big house in the sun-kissed Santa Clara Valley. Judge

Miller's place, it was called. It stood back from the road, half hidden

among the trees, through which glimpses could be caught of the wide

cool veranda that ran around its four sides. The house was approached by

gravelled driveways which wound about through wide-spreading lawns and

under the interlacing boughs of tall poplars. At the rear things were on

even a more spacious scale than at the front. There were great stables,

where a dozen grooms and boys held forth, rows of vine-clad servants'

cottages, an endless and orderly array of outhouses, long grape arbors,

green pastures, orchards, and berry patches. Then there was the pumping

plant for the artesian well, and the big cement tank where Judge

Miller's boys took their morning plunge and kept cool in the hot

afternoon.

And over this great demesne Buck ruled. Here he was born, and here he

had lived the four years of his life. It was true, there were other

dogs, There could not but be other dogs on so vast a place, but they did

not count. They came and went, resided in the populous kennels, or lived

obscurely in the recesses of the house after the fashion of Toots, the

Japanese pug, or Ysabel, the Mexican hairless,--strange creatures that

rarely put nose out of doors or set foot to ground. On the other hand,

there were the fox terriers, a score of them at least, who yelped

fearful promises at Toots and Ysabel looking out of the windows at them

and protected by a legion of housemaids armed with brooms and mops.

But Buck was neither house-dog nor kennel-dog. The whole realm was his.

He plunged into the swimming tank or went hunting with the Judge's sons;

he escorted Mollie and Alice, the Judge's daughters, on long twilight

or early morning rambles; on wintry nights he lay at the Judge's feet

before the roaring library fire; he carried the Judge's grandsons on his

back, or rolled them in the grass, and guarded their footsteps through

wild adventures down to the fountain in the stable yard, and even

beyond, where the paddocks were, and the berry patches. Among the

terriers he stalked imperiously, and Toots and Ysabel he utterly

ignored, for he was king,--king over all creeping, crawling, flying

things of Judge Miller's place, humans included.

His father, Elmo, a huge St. Bernard, had been the Judge's inseparable

companion, and Buck bid fair to follow in the way of his father. He was

not so large,--he weighed only one hundred and forty pounds,--for his

mother, Shep, had been a Scotch shepherd dog. Nevertheless, one hundred

and forty pounds, to which was added the dignity that comes of good

living and universal respect, enabled him to carry himself in right

royal fashion. During the four years since his puppyhood he had lived

the life of a sated aristocrat; he had a fine pride in himself, was even

a trifle egotistical, as country gentlemen sometimes become because of

their insular situation. But he had saved himself by not becoming a mere

pampered house-dog. Hunting and kindred outdoor delights had kept down

the fat and hardened his muscles; and to him, as to the cold-tubbing

races, the love of water had been a tonic and a health preserver.

And this was the manner of dog Buck was in the fall of 1897, when the

Klondike strike dragged men from all the world into the frozen North.

But Buck did not read the newspapers, and he did not know that Manuel,

one of the gardener's helpers, was an undesirable acquaintance. Manuel

had one besetting sin. He loved to play Chinese lottery. Also, in his

gambling, he had one besetting weakness--faith in a system; and this

made his damnation certain. For to play a system requires money, while

the wages of a gardener's helper do not lap over the needs of a wife and

numerous progeny.

Question 7 7. Whose footsteps has Buck followed in?

Use this material to answer questions #5 through #8

Read the following from Jack London's ''The Call of the Wild'' and answer the following questions.

Buck did not read the newspapers, or he would have known that trouble

was brewing, not alone for himself, but for every tide-water dog, strong

of muscle and with warm, long hair, from Puget Sound to San Diego.

Because men, groping in the Arctic darkness, had found a yellow metal,

and because steamship and transportation companies were booming the

find, thousands of men were rushing into the Northland. These men wanted

dogs, and the dogs they wanted were heavy dogs, with strong muscles by

which to toil, and furry coats to protect them from the frost.

Buck lived at a big house in the sun-kissed Santa Clara Valley. Judge

Miller's place, it was called. It stood back from the road, half hidden

among the trees, through which glimpses could be caught of the wide

cool veranda that ran around its four sides. The house was approached by

gravelled driveways which wound about through wide-spreading lawns and

under the interlacing boughs of tall poplars. At the rear things were on

even a more spacious scale than at the front. There were great stables,

where a dozen grooms and boys held forth, rows of vine-clad servants'

cottages, an endless and orderly array of outhouses, long grape arbors,

green pastures, orchards, and berry patches. Then there was the pumping

plant for the artesian well, and the big cement tank where Judge

Miller's boys took their morning plunge and kept cool in the hot

afternoon.

And over this great demesne Buck ruled. Here he was born, and here he

had lived the four years of his life. It was true, there were other

dogs, There could not but be other dogs on so vast a place, but they did

not count. They came and went, resided in the populous kennels, or lived

obscurely in the recesses of the house after the fashion of Toots, the

Japanese pug, or Ysabel, the Mexican hairless,--strange creatures that

rarely put nose out of doors or set foot to ground. On the other hand,

there were the fox terriers, a score of them at least, who yelped

fearful promises at Toots and Ysabel looking out of the windows at them

and protected by a legion of housemaids armed with brooms and mops.

But Buck was neither house-dog nor kennel-dog. The whole realm was his.

He plunged into the swimming tank or went hunting with the Judge's sons;

he escorted Mollie and Alice, the Judge's daughters, on long twilight

or early morning rambles; on wintry nights he lay at the Judge's feet

before the roaring library fire; he carried the Judge's grandsons on his

back, or rolled them in the grass, and guarded their footsteps through

wild adventures down to the fountain in the stable yard, and even

beyond, where the paddocks were, and the berry patches. Among the

terriers he stalked imperiously, and Toots and Ysabel he utterly

ignored, for he was king,--king over all creeping, crawling, flying

things of Judge Miller's place, humans included.

His father, Elmo, a huge St. Bernard, had been the Judge's inseparable

companion, and Buck bid fair to follow in the way of his father. He was

not so large,--he weighed only one hundred and forty pounds,--for his

mother, Shep, had been a Scotch shepherd dog. Nevertheless, one hundred

and forty pounds, to which was added the dignity that comes of good

living and universal respect, enabled him to carry himself in right

royal fashion. During the four years since his puppyhood he had lived

the life of a sated aristocrat; he had a fine pride in himself, was even

a trifle egotistical, as country gentlemen sometimes become because of

their insular situation. But he had saved himself by not becoming a mere

pampered house-dog. Hunting and kindred outdoor delights had kept down

the fat and hardened his muscles; and to him, as to the cold-tubbing

races, the love of water had been a tonic and a health preserver.

And this was the manner of dog Buck was in the fall of 1897, when the

Klondike strike dragged men from all the world into the frozen North.

But Buck did not read the newspapers, and he did not know that Manuel,

one of the gardener's helpers, was an undesirable acquaintance. Manuel

had one besetting sin. He loved to play Chinese lottery. Also, in his

gambling, he had one besetting weakness--faith in a system; and this

made his damnation certain. For to play a system requires money, while

the wages of a gardener's helper do not lap over the needs of a wife and

numerous progeny.

Question 8 8. According to Buck, what has been a health preserver for him?

Question 9 9. Which of the following utilizes correct subject-verb agreement?

Question 10 10. Which of the following letter closings is incorrect?

Question 11 11. Which of the following sentences contains a dependent clause?

Use this material to answer questions #12 through #14

Use the paragraph below to answer the following questions pertaining to correct grammar.


Mrs Anderson loves to travel with her family. They often go on long trips together and have flown across the country She loves going to Florida, California, and Maine especially because all three give her beautiful views of the Ocean. Next year, she plans to go to Hawaii and one day wants to go on a Cruise.

Question 12 12. Identify the error in the first sentence.

Use this material to answer questions #12 through #14

Use the paragraph below to answer the following questions pertaining to correct grammar.


Mrs Anderson loves to travel with her family. They often go on long trips together and have flown across the country She loves going to Florida, California, and Maine especially because all three give her beautiful views of the Ocean. Next year, she plans to go to Hawaii and one day wants to go on a Cruise.

Question 13 13. Identify and correct the error:

Use this material to answer questions #12 through #14

Use the paragraph below to answer the following questions pertaining to correct grammar.


Mrs Anderson loves to travel with her family. They often go on long trips together and have flown across the country She loves going to Florida, California, and Maine especially because all three give her beautiful views of the Ocean. Next year, she plans to go to Hawaii and one day wants to go on a Cruise.

Question 14 14. Which of the following does NOT need to be capitalized in the passage?

Question 15 15. Which of the following choices might be part of a persuasive essay focused on favoring increased speed limits?

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