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MTEL Communication & Literacy Skills (01): Practice & Study Guide Final Exam

Free Practice Test Instructions:

Choose your answer to the question and click 'Continue' to see how you did. Then click 'Next Question' to answer the next question. When you have completed the free practice test, click 'View Results' to see your results. Good luck!

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #7

1. Standing at 54 Pearl Street at the southern tip of Manhattan, Fraunces Tavern has a long

history as both a private home and commercial establishment. It was built in 1719 by the De

Lancey family and is the oldest standing building in the city.

2. Etienne De Lancey was a French

Huguenot which married into a wealthy Dutch family.

3. From 1740 to 1759 little is known about the use of 54 Pearl Street, though it is thought, based on records of other nearby buildings, that it was likely a private home or perhaps a mercantile.

4. Because it's property records are incomplete, it is not certain who occupied the building for nearly twenty years.5. From 1738 to 1740 the structure was rented as a dance studio and ball venue by Henry Holt, a former Londoner dance studios would have been a popular place for Americans to stay up-to-date with European styles and cultural developments.

6. From 1759 that building was sold to an import company, and then in 1762, to Samuel Fraunces, who opened The Sign of Queen Charlotte, a tavern. It became a hub for civic events and entertainment as well as a place for travelers to meet and socialize.

Question 1 1. Which part is least relevant to the main idea of the passage?

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #7

1. Standing at 54 Pearl Street at the southern tip of Manhattan, Fraunces Tavern has a long

history as both a private home and commercial establishment. It was built in 1719 by the De

Lancey family and is the oldest standing building in the city.

2. Etienne De Lancey was a French

Huguenot which married into a wealthy Dutch family.

3. From 1740 to 1759 little is known about the use of 54 Pearl Street, though it is thought, based on records of other nearby buildings, that it was likely a private home or perhaps a mercantile.

4. Because it's property records are incomplete, it is not certain who occupied the building for nearly twenty years.5. From 1738 to 1740 the structure was rented as a dance studio and ball venue by Henry Holt, a former Londoner dance studios would have been a popular place for Americans to stay up-to-date with European styles and cultural developments.

6. From 1759 that building was sold to an import company, and then in 1762, to Samuel Fraunces, who opened The Sign of Queen Charlotte, a tavern. It became a hub for civic events and entertainment as well as a place for travelers to meet and socialize.

Question 2 2. Which part of the passage contains a redundant expression of ideas or information?

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #7

1. Standing at 54 Pearl Street at the southern tip of Manhattan, Fraunces Tavern has a long

history as both a private home and commercial establishment. It was built in 1719 by the De

Lancey family and is the oldest standing building in the city.

2. Etienne De Lancey was a French

Huguenot which married into a wealthy Dutch family.

3. From 1740 to 1759 little is known about the use of 54 Pearl Street, though it is thought, based on records of other nearby buildings, that it was likely a private home or perhaps a mercantile.

4. Because it's property records are incomplete, it is not certain who occupied the building for nearly twenty years.5. From 1738 to 1740 the structure was rented as a dance studio and ball venue by Henry Holt, a former Londoner dance studios would have been a popular place for Americans to stay up-to-date with European styles and cultural developments.

6. From 1759 that building was sold to an import company, and then in 1762, to Samuel Fraunces, who opened The Sign of Queen Charlotte, a tavern. It became a hub for civic events and entertainment as well as a place for travelers to meet and socialize.

Question 3 3. Which of the following changes would improve the passage's organization?

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #7

1. Standing at 54 Pearl Street at the southern tip of Manhattan, Fraunces Tavern has a long

history as both a private home and commercial establishment. It was built in 1719 by the De

Lancey family and is the oldest standing building in the city.

2. Etienne De Lancey was a French

Huguenot which married into a wealthy Dutch family.

3. From 1740 to 1759 little is known about the use of 54 Pearl Street, though it is thought, based on records of other nearby buildings, that it was likely a private home or perhaps a mercantile.

4. Because it's property records are incomplete, it is not certain who occupied the building for nearly twenty years.5. From 1738 to 1740 the structure was rented as a dance studio and ball venue by Henry Holt, a former Londoner dance studios would have been a popular place for Americans to stay up-to-date with European styles and cultural developments.

6. From 1759 that building was sold to an import company, and then in 1762, to Samuel Fraunces, who opened The Sign of Queen Charlotte, a tavern. It became a hub for civic events and entertainment as well as a place for travelers to meet and socialize.

Question 4 4. Which part of the passage should be revised to correct an error in pronoun usage?

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #7

1. Standing at 54 Pearl Street at the southern tip of Manhattan, Fraunces Tavern has a long

history as both a private home and commercial establishment. It was built in 1719 by the De

Lancey family and is the oldest standing building in the city.

2. Etienne De Lancey was a French

Huguenot which married into a wealthy Dutch family.

3. From 1740 to 1759 little is known about the use of 54 Pearl Street, though it is thought, based on records of other nearby buildings, that it was likely a private home or perhaps a mercantile.

4. Because it's property records are incomplete, it is not certain who occupied the building for nearly twenty years.5. From 1738 to 1740 the structure was rented as a dance studio and ball venue by Henry Holt, a former Londoner dance studios would have been a popular place for Americans to stay up-to-date with European styles and cultural developments.

6. From 1759 that building was sold to an import company, and then in 1762, to Samuel Fraunces, who opened The Sign of Queen Charlotte, a tavern. It became a hub for civic events and entertainment as well as a place for travelers to meet and socialize.

Question 5 5. Which part of the passage should be revised to correct an error in preposition usage?

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #7

1. Standing at 54 Pearl Street at the southern tip of Manhattan, Fraunces Tavern has a long

history as both a private home and commercial establishment. It was built in 1719 by the De

Lancey family and is the oldest standing building in the city.

2. Etienne De Lancey was a French

Huguenot which married into a wealthy Dutch family.

3. From 1740 to 1759 little is known about the use of 54 Pearl Street, though it is thought, based on records of other nearby buildings, that it was likely a private home or perhaps a mercantile.

4. Because it's property records are incomplete, it is not certain who occupied the building for nearly twenty years.5. From 1738 to 1740 the structure was rented as a dance studio and ball venue by Henry Holt, a former Londoner dance studios would have been a popular place for Americans to stay up-to-date with European styles and cultural developments.

6. From 1759 that building was sold to an import company, and then in 1762, to Samuel Fraunces, who opened The Sign of Queen Charlotte, a tavern. It became a hub for civic events and entertainment as well as a place for travelers to meet and socialize.

Question 6 6. Which change is needed in Part 5?

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #7

1. Standing at 54 Pearl Street at the southern tip of Manhattan, Fraunces Tavern has a long

history as both a private home and commercial establishment. It was built in 1719 by the De

Lancey family and is the oldest standing building in the city.

2. Etienne De Lancey was a French

Huguenot which married into a wealthy Dutch family.

3. From 1740 to 1759 little is known about the use of 54 Pearl Street, though it is thought, based on records of other nearby buildings, that it was likely a private home or perhaps a mercantile.

4. Because it's property records are incomplete, it is not certain who occupied the building for nearly twenty years.5. From 1738 to 1740 the structure was rented as a dance studio and ball venue by Henry Holt, a former Londoner dance studios would have been a popular place for Americans to stay up-to-date with European styles and cultural developments.

6. From 1759 that building was sold to an import company, and then in 1762, to Samuel Fraunces, who opened The Sign of Queen Charlotte, a tavern. It became a hub for civic events and entertainment as well as a place for travelers to meet and socialize.

Question 7 7. Which change is needed in Part 2?

Use this material to answer questions #8 through #11

1. After studying the birds in Ohio and Indiana for a good many years, I moved to Eastern Kansas, where I lived for five and a half years. 2. My rambles were by no means confined to the wooded bluffs and hollows that bound the Missouri River on the west, for I also made excursions out upon the Prairies of

Kansas, over into the state of Missouri, and down into Oklahoma; and everywhere I carried my field glass with me and kept both eyes intent on the birds. 3. You would expect an enthusiast in the pursuit of birdlore to do nothing else. 4. What a pleasure it was to ramble about in new fields, and make acquaintance with new bird friends! 5. There is not a very marked difference between the Avifauna of eastern Kansas and Ohio, and yet there are some birds found in the former state that are not met with in the latter, enough to keep the observer on the tiptoe of expectancy for several months.

Question 8 8. Which change is needed in Part 1?

Use this material to answer questions #8 through #11

1. After studying the birds in Ohio and Indiana for a good many years, I moved to Eastern Kansas, where I lived for five and a half years. 2. My rambles were by no means confined to the wooded bluffs and hollows that bound the Missouri River on the west, for I also made excursions out upon the Prairies of

Kansas, over into the state of Missouri, and down into Oklahoma; and everywhere I carried my field glass with me and kept both eyes intent on the birds. 3. You would expect an enthusiast in the pursuit of birdlore to do nothing else. 4. What a pleasure it was to ramble about in new fields, and make acquaintance with new bird friends! 5. There is not a very marked difference between the Avifauna of eastern Kansas and Ohio, and yet there are some birds found in the former state that are not met with in the latter, enough to keep the observer on the tiptoe of expectancy for several months.

Question 9 9. Which change is needed in Part 2?

Use this material to answer questions #8 through #11

1. After studying the birds in Ohio and Indiana for a good many years, I moved to Eastern Kansas, where I lived for five and a half years. 2. My rambles were by no means confined to the wooded bluffs and hollows that bound the Missouri River on the west, for I also made excursions out upon the Prairies of

Kansas, over into the state of Missouri, and down into Oklahoma; and everywhere I carried my field glass with me and kept both eyes intent on the birds. 3. You would expect an enthusiast in the pursuit of birdlore to do nothing else. 4. What a pleasure it was to ramble about in new fields, and make acquaintance with new bird friends! 5. There is not a very marked difference between the Avifauna of eastern Kansas and Ohio, and yet there are some birds found in the former state that are not met with in the latter, enough to keep the observer on the tiptoe of expectancy for several months.

Question 10 10. Which change is needed in Part 3?

Use this material to answer questions #8 through #11

1. After studying the birds in Ohio and Indiana for a good many years, I moved to Eastern Kansas, where I lived for five and a half years. 2. My rambles were by no means confined to the wooded bluffs and hollows that bound the Missouri River on the west, for I also made excursions out upon the Prairies of

Kansas, over into the state of Missouri, and down into Oklahoma; and everywhere I carried my field glass with me and kept both eyes intent on the birds. 3. You would expect an enthusiast in the pursuit of birdlore to do nothing else. 4. What a pleasure it was to ramble about in new fields, and make acquaintance with new bird friends! 5. There is not a very marked difference between the Avifauna of eastern Kansas and Ohio, and yet there are some birds found in the former state that are not met with in the latter, enough to keep the observer on the tiptoe of expectancy for several months.

Question 11 11. Which change is needed in Part 4?

Use this material to answer questions #12 through #13

1 It is thought that the Anasazi civilization began around 1500 B.C., and in the 10th and 11th

centuries, and it flourished in Chaco Canyon in western New Mexico. Toward the end of the

13th century, a catastrophic event forced the Anasazi to leave the cliff dwellings and Pueblo

Bonito, the elaborate 800-room complex in which they lived.

2. They moved south and east

toward the Rio Grande and Little Colorado Rivers.

3. The modern-day Pueblo people who descended from the Anasazi have an oral tradition that

explains their ancestors' migrations, but those stories are kept secret.

4. Anthropologists have

been unable to access tribal histories passed down through tribal elders. Recent archeological

discoveries hint at war, violence, and even cannibalism.

5. Evidence suggests that there were

executions of leaders and efforts to socialize people to live in fear and attack one another to

keep certain groups and individuals in power.

6. It is only recently that the scientific community

has begun to let go of long-held perceptions that the Anasazi were a pacific, sedentary

collective with established burial rites that honored the dead. The slumped skeletons and

caved-in skulls found in recent years belie earlier notions of these lost people.

Question 12 12. Which part is least relevant to the main idea of the passage?

Use this material to answer questions #12 through #13

1 It is thought that the Anasazi civilization began around 1500 B.C., and in the 10th and 11th

centuries, and it flourished in Chaco Canyon in western New Mexico. Toward the end of the

13th century, a catastrophic event forced the Anasazi to leave the cliff dwellings and Pueblo

Bonito, the elaborate 800-room complex in which they lived.

2. They moved south and east

toward the Rio Grande and Little Colorado Rivers.

3. The modern-day Pueblo people who descended from the Anasazi have an oral tradition that

explains their ancestors' migrations, but those stories are kept secret.

4. Anthropologists have

been unable to access tribal histories passed down through tribal elders. Recent archeological

discoveries hint at war, violence, and even cannibalism.

5. Evidence suggests that there were

executions of leaders and efforts to socialize people to live in fear and attack one another to

keep certain groups and individuals in power.

6. It is only recently that the scientific community

has begun to let go of long-held perceptions that the Anasazi were a pacific, sedentary

collective with established burial rites that honored the dead. The slumped skeletons and

caved-in skulls found in recent years belie earlier notions of these lost people.

Question 13 13. Which part of the passage contains a redundant expression of ideas or information?

Use this material to answer questions #14 through #15

1. Many people come to Hartford to address meetings as advocates of some reform. Tonight it is not to advocate a reform that I address a meeting in Hartford. I do not come here as an advocate, because whatever position the suffrage movement may occupy in the United States of America, in England it has passed beyond the realm of advocacy and it has entered into the sphere of practical politics. It has become the subject of revolution and civil war, and so tonight I am not here to advocate woman suffrage. American suffragists can do that very well for themselves.

2. I am here as a soldier who has temporarily left the field of battle in order to explain - it seems strange it should have to be explained - what civil war is like when civil war is waged by women. I am not only here as a soldier temporarily absent from the field at battle; I am here - and that, I think, is the strangest part of my coming - I am here as a person who, according to the law courts of my country, it has been decided, is of no value to the community at all: and I am adjudged because of my life to be a dangerous person, under sentence of penal servitude in a convict prison. So you see there is some special interest in hearing so unusual a person address you. I dare say, in the minds of many of you -you will perhaps forgive me this personal touch - that I do not look either very like a soldier or very like a convict, and yet I am both.

3. Now, first of all I want to make you understand the inevitableness of revolution and civil war, even on the part of women, when you reach a certain stage in the development of a community's life. It is not at all difficult if revolutionaries come to you from Russia, if they come to you from China, or from any other part of the world, if they are men, to make you understand revolution in five minutes, every man and every woman to understand revolutionary methods when they are adopted by men.

4. Many of you have expressed sympathy, probably even practical sympathy, with revolutionaries in Russia. I dare say you have followed with considerable interest the story of how the Chinese revolutionary, Sun Yat-sen, conducted the Chinese revolution from England. And yet I find in American newspapers there is a great deal of misunderstanding of the fact that one of the chief minds engaged in conducting the women's revolution is, for purposes of convenience, located in Paris. It is quite easy for you to understand - it would not be necessary for me to enter into explanations at all - the desirability of revolution if I were a man, in any of these countries, even in a part of the British Empire known to you as Ireland. If an Irish revolutionary had addressed this meeting, and many have addressed meetings all over the United States during the last twenty or thirty years, it would not be necessary for that revolutionary to explain the need of revolution beyond saying that the people of his

country were denied - and by people, meaning men - were denied the right of self-government. That would explain the whole situation. If I were a man and I said to you, 'I come from a country which professes to have representative institutions and yet denies me, a taxpayer, an inhabitant of the country, representative rights,' you would at once understand that that human being, being a man, was justified in the adoption of revolutionary methods to get representative institutions. But since I am a woman it is necessary in the twentieth century to explain why women have adopted revolutionary methods in order to win the rights of citizenship.


--from Emmeline Pankhurst's Freedom or Death

Question 14 14. Which three main topics would best help outline information in this passage?

Use this material to answer questions #14 through #15

1. Many people come to Hartford to address meetings as advocates of some reform. Tonight it is not to advocate a reform that I address a meeting in Hartford. I do not come here as an advocate, because whatever position the suffrage movement may occupy in the United States of America, in England it has passed beyond the realm of advocacy and it has entered into the sphere of practical politics. It has become the subject of revolution and civil war, and so tonight I am not here to advocate woman suffrage. American suffragists can do that very well for themselves.

2. I am here as a soldier who has temporarily left the field of battle in order to explain - it seems strange it should have to be explained - what civil war is like when civil war is waged by women. I am not only here as a soldier temporarily absent from the field at battle; I am here - and that, I think, is the strangest part of my coming - I am here as a person who, according to the law courts of my country, it has been decided, is of no value to the community at all: and I am adjudged because of my life to be a dangerous person, under sentence of penal servitude in a convict prison. So you see there is some special interest in hearing so unusual a person address you. I dare say, in the minds of many of you -you will perhaps forgive me this personal touch - that I do not look either very like a soldier or very like a convict, and yet I am both.

3. Now, first of all I want to make you understand the inevitableness of revolution and civil war, even on the part of women, when you reach a certain stage in the development of a community's life. It is not at all difficult if revolutionaries come to you from Russia, if they come to you from China, or from any other part of the world, if they are men, to make you understand revolution in five minutes, every man and every woman to understand revolutionary methods when they are adopted by men.

4. Many of you have expressed sympathy, probably even practical sympathy, with revolutionaries in Russia. I dare say you have followed with considerable interest the story of how the Chinese revolutionary, Sun Yat-sen, conducted the Chinese revolution from England. And yet I find in American newspapers there is a great deal of misunderstanding of the fact that one of the chief minds engaged in conducting the women's revolution is, for purposes of convenience, located in Paris. It is quite easy for you to understand - it would not be necessary for me to enter into explanations at all - the desirability of revolution if I were a man, in any of these countries, even in a part of the British Empire known to you as Ireland. If an Irish revolutionary had addressed this meeting, and many have addressed meetings all over the United States during the last twenty or thirty years, it would not be necessary for that revolutionary to explain the need of revolution beyond saying that the people of his

country were denied - and by people, meaning men - were denied the right of self-government. That would explain the whole situation. If I were a man and I said to you, 'I come from a country which professes to have representative institutions and yet denies me, a taxpayer, an inhabitant of the country, representative rights,' you would at once understand that that human being, being a man, was justified in the adoption of revolutionary methods to get representative institutions. But since I am a woman it is necessary in the twentieth century to explain why women have adopted revolutionary methods in order to win the rights of citizenship.


--from Emmeline Pankhurst's Freedom or Death

Question 15 15. Which of the following details from the passage best supports the author's assertion that ''revolutions are inevitable'' in a community's evolution?

Tell us about yourself

Are you a student or a teacher?

I am a student I am a teacher

MTEL Communication & Literacy Skills (01): Practice & Study Guide Final Free Practice Test Instructions

Choose your answer to the question and click 'Continue' to see how you did. Then click 'Next Question' to answer the next question. When you have completed the free practice test, click 'View Results' to see your results. Good luck!

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