NES Essential Academic Skills Reading Subtest 1 (001): Practice & Study Guide Final Exam

Free Practice Test Instructions:

Choose your answer to the question and click 'Continue' to see how you did. Then click 'Next Question' to answer the next question. When you have completed the free practice test, click 'View Results' to see your results. Good luck!

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #5

Read the National Public Radio article ''An Old Tree Doesn't Get Taller, But Bulks Up Like A Bodybuilder'' and answer the questions that follow.


By Richard Harris


The world's biggest trees, such as this large Scots pine in Spain's Sierra de Baza range, are also the world's fastest-growing trees, according to an analysis of 403 tree species spanning six continents.


Like other animals and many living things, we humans grow when we're young and then stop growing once we mature. But trees, it turns out, are an exception to this general rule. In fact, scientists have discovered that trees grow faster the older they get.


Once trees reach a certain height, they do stop getting taller. So many foresters figured that tree growth - and girth - also slowed with age.


''What we found was the exact opposite,'' says Nate Stephenson, a forest ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, based in California's Sequoia and Kings Canyon national parks. ''Tree growth rate increases continuously as trees get bigger and bigger,'' Stephenson says.


There have been hints before that mature trees grow faster than they age, but the idea had been controversial, he says. So he got together with 37 scientists from 16 nations to answer the question on a global scale.


They examined nearly 700,000 trees that have been the subject of long-term studies. Their conclusion, published in this week's issue of the journal Nature: While trees did stop getting taller, they continued to get wider - packing on more and more mass the older they got. And we're not talking about the tree-equivalent of an aging crowd with beer guts - old trees are more like active, healthy bodybuilders.


''It's as if, on your favorite sports team, you find out the star players are a bunch of 90-year-olds,'' Stephenson says. ''They're the most active. They're the ones scoring the most points. That's an important thing to know.''


Because, in the world of trees, that means the oldest members of the forest are doing the most to pull carbon dioxide out of the air and to store it as carbon in their wood. Stephenson says that's another argument for preserving old-growth forests.


''Not only do they hold a lot of carbon, but they're adding carbon at a tremendous rate,'' Stephenson says. ''And that's going to be really important to understand when we're trying to predict how the forests are going to change in the future - in the face of a changing climate or other environmental changes.''


Some ecologists have argued that young forests are more important than old forests for combating climate change, because the thousands of small trees that replace the few big ones do, collectively, pull more carbon dioxide out of the air than the mature forest does. But Stephenson says that doesn't give full credit to the importance of old trees.


And the results have implications that go beyond conservation strategies. The findings challenge an assumption that has seemingly applied to all of biology.


''We didn't think that things could have unlimited growth potential,' says Nathan Phillips at Boston University. ''There's been a long history of that kind of thinking.''


But the new study shows that when it comes to growth in trees - well, the sky's the limit. And this leaves Phillips wondering whether trees might, in fact, have the potential to live forever. He tries to imagine how long a tree would live if you could prevent it from being blown down or succumbing to drought or disease.


''How long could it go? I think it could go for a long, long time - basically indefinitely,'' he says.


Phillips has seen 500-year-old Douglas fir trees that are still producing scads of cones, which means they're still reproducing. So when it comes to aging, trees have something very special going on.


https://www.npr.org/2014/01/16/262479807/old-trees-grow-faster-with-every-year

Question 1 1. This passage would best be described as:

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #5

Read the National Public Radio article ''An Old Tree Doesn't Get Taller, But Bulks Up Like A Bodybuilder'' and answer the questions that follow.


By Richard Harris


The world's biggest trees, such as this large Scots pine in Spain's Sierra de Baza range, are also the world's fastest-growing trees, according to an analysis of 403 tree species spanning six continents.


Like other animals and many living things, we humans grow when we're young and then stop growing once we mature. But trees, it turns out, are an exception to this general rule. In fact, scientists have discovered that trees grow faster the older they get.


Once trees reach a certain height, they do stop getting taller. So many foresters figured that tree growth - and girth - also slowed with age.


''What we found was the exact opposite,'' says Nate Stephenson, a forest ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, based in California's Sequoia and Kings Canyon national parks. ''Tree growth rate increases continuously as trees get bigger and bigger,'' Stephenson says.


There have been hints before that mature trees grow faster than they age, but the idea had been controversial, he says. So he got together with 37 scientists from 16 nations to answer the question on a global scale.


They examined nearly 700,000 trees that have been the subject of long-term studies. Their conclusion, published in this week's issue of the journal Nature: While trees did stop getting taller, they continued to get wider - packing on more and more mass the older they got. And we're not talking about the tree-equivalent of an aging crowd with beer guts - old trees are more like active, healthy bodybuilders.


''It's as if, on your favorite sports team, you find out the star players are a bunch of 90-year-olds,'' Stephenson says. ''They're the most active. They're the ones scoring the most points. That's an important thing to know.''


Because, in the world of trees, that means the oldest members of the forest are doing the most to pull carbon dioxide out of the air and to store it as carbon in their wood. Stephenson says that's another argument for preserving old-growth forests.


''Not only do they hold a lot of carbon, but they're adding carbon at a tremendous rate,'' Stephenson says. ''And that's going to be really important to understand when we're trying to predict how the forests are going to change in the future - in the face of a changing climate or other environmental changes.''


Some ecologists have argued that young forests are more important than old forests for combating climate change, because the thousands of small trees that replace the few big ones do, collectively, pull more carbon dioxide out of the air than the mature forest does. But Stephenson says that doesn't give full credit to the importance of old trees.


And the results have implications that go beyond conservation strategies. The findings challenge an assumption that has seemingly applied to all of biology.


''We didn't think that things could have unlimited growth potential,' says Nathan Phillips at Boston University. ''There's been a long history of that kind of thinking.''


But the new study shows that when it comes to growth in trees - well, the sky's the limit. And this leaves Phillips wondering whether trees might, in fact, have the potential to live forever. He tries to imagine how long a tree would live if you could prevent it from being blown down or succumbing to drought or disease.


''How long could it go? I think it could go for a long, long time - basically indefinitely,'' he says.


Phillips has seen 500-year-old Douglas fir trees that are still producing scads of cones, which means they're still reproducing. So when it comes to aging, trees have something very special going on.


https://www.npr.org/2014/01/16/262479807/old-trees-grow-faster-with-every-year

Question 2 2. Which of the following from the passage would be considered an opinion?

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #5

Read the National Public Radio article ''An Old Tree Doesn't Get Taller, But Bulks Up Like A Bodybuilder'' and answer the questions that follow.


By Richard Harris


The world's biggest trees, such as this large Scots pine in Spain's Sierra de Baza range, are also the world's fastest-growing trees, according to an analysis of 403 tree species spanning six continents.


Like other animals and many living things, we humans grow when we're young and then stop growing once we mature. But trees, it turns out, are an exception to this general rule. In fact, scientists have discovered that trees grow faster the older they get.


Once trees reach a certain height, they do stop getting taller. So many foresters figured that tree growth - and girth - also slowed with age.


''What we found was the exact opposite,'' says Nate Stephenson, a forest ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, based in California's Sequoia and Kings Canyon national parks. ''Tree growth rate increases continuously as trees get bigger and bigger,'' Stephenson says.


There have been hints before that mature trees grow faster than they age, but the idea had been controversial, he says. So he got together with 37 scientists from 16 nations to answer the question on a global scale.


They examined nearly 700,000 trees that have been the subject of long-term studies. Their conclusion, published in this week's issue of the journal Nature: While trees did stop getting taller, they continued to get wider - packing on more and more mass the older they got. And we're not talking about the tree-equivalent of an aging crowd with beer guts - old trees are more like active, healthy bodybuilders.


''It's as if, on your favorite sports team, you find out the star players are a bunch of 90-year-olds,'' Stephenson says. ''They're the most active. They're the ones scoring the most points. That's an important thing to know.''


Because, in the world of trees, that means the oldest members of the forest are doing the most to pull carbon dioxide out of the air and to store it as carbon in their wood. Stephenson says that's another argument for preserving old-growth forests.


''Not only do they hold a lot of carbon, but they're adding carbon at a tremendous rate,'' Stephenson says. ''And that's going to be really important to understand when we're trying to predict how the forests are going to change in the future - in the face of a changing climate or other environmental changes.''


Some ecologists have argued that young forests are more important than old forests for combating climate change, because the thousands of small trees that replace the few big ones do, collectively, pull more carbon dioxide out of the air than the mature forest does. But Stephenson says that doesn't give full credit to the importance of old trees.


And the results have implications that go beyond conservation strategies. The findings challenge an assumption that has seemingly applied to all of biology.


''We didn't think that things could have unlimited growth potential,' says Nathan Phillips at Boston University. ''There's been a long history of that kind of thinking.''


But the new study shows that when it comes to growth in trees - well, the sky's the limit. And this leaves Phillips wondering whether trees might, in fact, have the potential to live forever. He tries to imagine how long a tree would live if you could prevent it from being blown down or succumbing to drought or disease.


''How long could it go? I think it could go for a long, long time - basically indefinitely,'' he says.


Phillips has seen 500-year-old Douglas fir trees that are still producing scads of cones, which means they're still reproducing. So when it comes to aging, trees have something very special going on.


https://www.npr.org/2014/01/16/262479807/old-trees-grow-faster-with-every-year

Question 3 3. Harris uses the word ''biology'' in the passage. Using affixes and roots, the meaning of the word ''biology'' most closely matches:

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #5

Read the National Public Radio article ''An Old Tree Doesn't Get Taller, But Bulks Up Like A Bodybuilder'' and answer the questions that follow.


By Richard Harris


The world's biggest trees, such as this large Scots pine in Spain's Sierra de Baza range, are also the world's fastest-growing trees, according to an analysis of 403 tree species spanning six continents.


Like other animals and many living things, we humans grow when we're young and then stop growing once we mature. But trees, it turns out, are an exception to this general rule. In fact, scientists have discovered that trees grow faster the older they get.


Once trees reach a certain height, they do stop getting taller. So many foresters figured that tree growth - and girth - also slowed with age.


''What we found was the exact opposite,'' says Nate Stephenson, a forest ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, based in California's Sequoia and Kings Canyon national parks. ''Tree growth rate increases continuously as trees get bigger and bigger,'' Stephenson says.


There have been hints before that mature trees grow faster than they age, but the idea had been controversial, he says. So he got together with 37 scientists from 16 nations to answer the question on a global scale.


They examined nearly 700,000 trees that have been the subject of long-term studies. Their conclusion, published in this week's issue of the journal Nature: While trees did stop getting taller, they continued to get wider - packing on more and more mass the older they got. And we're not talking about the tree-equivalent of an aging crowd with beer guts - old trees are more like active, healthy bodybuilders.


''It's as if, on your favorite sports team, you find out the star players are a bunch of 90-year-olds,'' Stephenson says. ''They're the most active. They're the ones scoring the most points. That's an important thing to know.''


Because, in the world of trees, that means the oldest members of the forest are doing the most to pull carbon dioxide out of the air and to store it as carbon in their wood. Stephenson says that's another argument for preserving old-growth forests.


''Not only do they hold a lot of carbon, but they're adding carbon at a tremendous rate,'' Stephenson says. ''And that's going to be really important to understand when we're trying to predict how the forests are going to change in the future - in the face of a changing climate or other environmental changes.''


Some ecologists have argued that young forests are more important than old forests for combating climate change, because the thousands of small trees that replace the few big ones do, collectively, pull more carbon dioxide out of the air than the mature forest does. But Stephenson says that doesn't give full credit to the importance of old trees.


And the results have implications that go beyond conservation strategies. The findings challenge an assumption that has seemingly applied to all of biology.


''We didn't think that things could have unlimited growth potential,' says Nathan Phillips at Boston University. ''There's been a long history of that kind of thinking.''


But the new study shows that when it comes to growth in trees - well, the sky's the limit. And this leaves Phillips wondering whether trees might, in fact, have the potential to live forever. He tries to imagine how long a tree would live if you could prevent it from being blown down or succumbing to drought or disease.


''How long could it go? I think it could go for a long, long time - basically indefinitely,'' he says.


Phillips has seen 500-year-old Douglas fir trees that are still producing scads of cones, which means they're still reproducing. So when it comes to aging, trees have something very special going on.


https://www.npr.org/2014/01/16/262479807/old-trees-grow-faster-with-every-year

Question 4 4. Which of the following details from the passage supports the idea that trees could live forever?

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #5

Read the National Public Radio article ''An Old Tree Doesn't Get Taller, But Bulks Up Like A Bodybuilder'' and answer the questions that follow.


By Richard Harris


The world's biggest trees, such as this large Scots pine in Spain's Sierra de Baza range, are also the world's fastest-growing trees, according to an analysis of 403 tree species spanning six continents.


Like other animals and many living things, we humans grow when we're young and then stop growing once we mature. But trees, it turns out, are an exception to this general rule. In fact, scientists have discovered that trees grow faster the older they get.


Once trees reach a certain height, they do stop getting taller. So many foresters figured that tree growth - and girth - also slowed with age.


''What we found was the exact opposite,'' says Nate Stephenson, a forest ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, based in California's Sequoia and Kings Canyon national parks. ''Tree growth rate increases continuously as trees get bigger and bigger,'' Stephenson says.


There have been hints before that mature trees grow faster than they age, but the idea had been controversial, he says. So he got together with 37 scientists from 16 nations to answer the question on a global scale.


They examined nearly 700,000 trees that have been the subject of long-term studies. Their conclusion, published in this week's issue of the journal Nature: While trees did stop getting taller, they continued to get wider - packing on more and more mass the older they got. And we're not talking about the tree-equivalent of an aging crowd with beer guts - old trees are more like active, healthy bodybuilders.


''It's as if, on your favorite sports team, you find out the star players are a bunch of 90-year-olds,'' Stephenson says. ''They're the most active. They're the ones scoring the most points. That's an important thing to know.''


Because, in the world of trees, that means the oldest members of the forest are doing the most to pull carbon dioxide out of the air and to store it as carbon in their wood. Stephenson says that's another argument for preserving old-growth forests.


''Not only do they hold a lot of carbon, but they're adding carbon at a tremendous rate,'' Stephenson says. ''And that's going to be really important to understand when we're trying to predict how the forests are going to change in the future - in the face of a changing climate or other environmental changes.''


Some ecologists have argued that young forests are more important than old forests for combating climate change, because the thousands of small trees that replace the few big ones do, collectively, pull more carbon dioxide out of the air than the mature forest does. But Stephenson says that doesn't give full credit to the importance of old trees.


And the results have implications that go beyond conservation strategies. The findings challenge an assumption that has seemingly applied to all of biology.


''We didn't think that things could have unlimited growth potential,' says Nathan Phillips at Boston University. ''There's been a long history of that kind of thinking.''


But the new study shows that when it comes to growth in trees - well, the sky's the limit. And this leaves Phillips wondering whether trees might, in fact, have the potential to live forever. He tries to imagine how long a tree would live if you could prevent it from being blown down or succumbing to drought or disease.


''How long could it go? I think it could go for a long, long time - basically indefinitely,'' he says.


Phillips has seen 500-year-old Douglas fir trees that are still producing scads of cones, which means they're still reproducing. So when it comes to aging, trees have something very special going on.


https://www.npr.org/2014/01/16/262479807/old-trees-grow-faster-with-every-year

Question 5 5. The author's main purpose in the passage is to:

Use this material to answer questions #6 through #10

Read the poem ''An Old House'' and answer the questions that follow.


An Old House


An old house is a picture

Between two pages of history.


Its lines are etched by the slanting

Long fingers of rain and sun.


Its walls are stained and yellow

As the margin of an old book.


Down to the windows dark branches

Droop with the heaviness of leaves.


The wind among them is like

The turning of many pages.


--Florida Watts Smyth

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/browse?contentId=19368

Question 6 6. The last two lines of the poem are an example of:

Use this material to answer questions #6 through #10

Read the poem ''An Old House'' and answer the questions that follow.


An Old House


An old house is a picture

Between two pages of history.


Its lines are etched by the slanting

Long fingers of rain and sun.


Its walls are stained and yellow

As the margin of an old book.


Down to the windows dark branches

Droop with the heaviness of leaves.


The wind among them is like

The turning of many pages.


--Florida Watts Smyth

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/browse?contentId=19368

Question 7 7. Smyth uses personification in the third and fourth line of the poem in order to express which concept?

Use this material to answer questions #6 through #10

Read the poem ''An Old House'' and answer the questions that follow.


An Old House


An old house is a picture

Between two pages of history.


Its lines are etched by the slanting

Long fingers of rain and sun.


Its walls are stained and yellow

As the margin of an old book.


Down to the windows dark branches

Droop with the heaviness of leaves.


The wind among them is like

The turning of many pages.


--Florida Watts Smyth

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/browse?contentId=19368

Question 8 8. Smyth uses the extended metaphor, comparing an old house to a book, to convey that an old house:

Use this material to answer questions #6 through #10

Read the poem ''An Old House'' and answer the questions that follow.


An Old House


An old house is a picture

Between two pages of history.


Its lines are etched by the slanting

Long fingers of rain and sun.


Its walls are stained and yellow

As the margin of an old book.


Down to the windows dark branches

Droop with the heaviness of leaves.


The wind among them is like

The turning of many pages.


--Florida Watts Smyth

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/browse?contentId=19368

Question 9 9. In line 3, the word 'etched' means:

Use this material to answer questions #6 through #10

Read the poem ''An Old House'' and answer the questions that follow.


An Old House


An old house is a picture

Between two pages of history.


Its lines are etched by the slanting

Long fingers of rain and sun.


Its walls are stained and yellow

As the margin of an old book.


Down to the windows dark branches

Droop with the heaviness of leaves.


The wind among them is like

The turning of many pages.


--Florida Watts Smyth

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/browse?contentId=19368

Question 10 10. Smyth uses the words ''old,'' ''stained,'' ''dark,'' ''droop,'' and ''heaviness.'' In the poem, these words add a feeling of sadness to the:

Use this material to answer questions #11 through #14

Read the article National Geographic article ''Meet This Cast of Canine Characters'' and answer the questions that follow.


Vincent J. Musi has photographed prairie dogs, lemurs, orangutans, parrots, a hedgehog, and skunks to name a few. His newest portrait subjects may be less exotic, but no less expressive. They are the canine companions of mostly friends and neighbors whom Musi invites to his studio for a portrait shoot. Just the dogs, though. The owners are welcome to wait outside. Musi wants the dogs' full attention.


With the help of his wife, photographer Callie Shell, and Ed Diaz, whom he calls the ''Cesar Millan of Charleston,'' Musi has been trying to figure out how to read the dogs' behavior so that he can capture those blink-of-an-eye moments where their unique essence shines through. ''There is a moment when I sense this energy I am trying to convey. There is this nobility. If people can see (in these dogs) what their owners do, that's good,'' he says, slobber and all.


Each dog has a backstory but Musi isn't as interested in that. He instead chooses to title the images simply with the dogs' names and date. ''I get a very human kind of feeling when I come away from them. I don't want to talk about them as breeds. I want to talk about them as personalities.''


By Alexa Keefe


https://www.nationalgeographic.com/photography/proof/2018/february/musi-dog-portraits

PUBLISHED February 6, 2018

Question 11 11. In paragraph one, Keefe writes that the dog '~'owners are welcome to wait outside'' and he ''wants the dogs' full attention.'' This implies that the photographer Musi thinks which of the following:

Use this material to answer questions #11 through #14

Read the article National Geographic article ''Meet This Cast of Canine Characters'' and answer the questions that follow.


Vincent J. Musi has photographed prairie dogs, lemurs, orangutans, parrots, a hedgehog, and skunks to name a few. His newest portrait subjects may be less exotic, but no less expressive. They are the canine companions of mostly friends and neighbors whom Musi invites to his studio for a portrait shoot. Just the dogs, though. The owners are welcome to wait outside. Musi wants the dogs' full attention.


With the help of his wife, photographer Callie Shell, and Ed Diaz, whom he calls the ''Cesar Millan of Charleston,'' Musi has been trying to figure out how to read the dogs' behavior so that he can capture those blink-of-an-eye moments where their unique essence shines through. ''There is a moment when I sense this energy I am trying to convey. There is this nobility. If people can see (in these dogs) what their owners do, that's good,'' he says, slobber and all.


Each dog has a backstory but Musi isn't as interested in that. He instead chooses to title the images simply with the dogs' names and date. ''I get a very human kind of feeling when I come away from them. I don't want to talk about them as breeds. I want to talk about them as personalities.''


By Alexa Keefe


https://www.nationalgeographic.com/photography/proof/2018/february/musi-dog-portraits

PUBLISHED February 6, 2018

Question 12 12.

In paragraph two, Keefe writes that Musi ''has been trying to figure out how to read the dogs' behavior so that he can capture those blink-of-an-eye moments where their unique essence shines through. There is a moment when I sense this energy I am trying to convey.''


Which of the following is a synonym for the word ''convey'' as it is used in this sentence?

Use this material to answer questions #11 through #14

Read the article National Geographic article ''Meet This Cast of Canine Characters'' and answer the questions that follow.


Vincent J. Musi has photographed prairie dogs, lemurs, orangutans, parrots, a hedgehog, and skunks to name a few. His newest portrait subjects may be less exotic, but no less expressive. They are the canine companions of mostly friends and neighbors whom Musi invites to his studio for a portrait shoot. Just the dogs, though. The owners are welcome to wait outside. Musi wants the dogs' full attention.


With the help of his wife, photographer Callie Shell, and Ed Diaz, whom he calls the ''Cesar Millan of Charleston,'' Musi has been trying to figure out how to read the dogs' behavior so that he can capture those blink-of-an-eye moments where their unique essence shines through. ''There is a moment when I sense this energy I am trying to convey. There is this nobility. If people can see (in these dogs) what their owners do, that's good,'' he says, slobber and all.


Each dog has a backstory but Musi isn't as interested in that. He instead chooses to title the images simply with the dogs' names and date. ''I get a very human kind of feeling when I come away from them. I don't want to talk about them as breeds. I want to talk about them as personalities.''


By Alexa Keefe


https://www.nationalgeographic.com/photography/proof/2018/february/musi-dog-portraits

PUBLISHED February 6, 2018

Question 13 13. Which of the following is the main idea of the article?

Use this material to answer questions #11 through #14

Read the article National Geographic article ''Meet This Cast of Canine Characters'' and answer the questions that follow.


Vincent J. Musi has photographed prairie dogs, lemurs, orangutans, parrots, a hedgehog, and skunks to name a few. His newest portrait subjects may be less exotic, but no less expressive. They are the canine companions of mostly friends and neighbors whom Musi invites to his studio for a portrait shoot. Just the dogs, though. The owners are welcome to wait outside. Musi wants the dogs' full attention.


With the help of his wife, photographer Callie Shell, and Ed Diaz, whom he calls the ''Cesar Millan of Charleston,'' Musi has been trying to figure out how to read the dogs' behavior so that he can capture those blink-of-an-eye moments where their unique essence shines through. ''There is a moment when I sense this energy I am trying to convey. There is this nobility. If people can see (in these dogs) what their owners do, that's good,'' he says, slobber and all.


Each dog has a backstory but Musi isn't as interested in that. He instead chooses to title the images simply with the dogs' names and date. ''I get a very human kind of feeling when I come away from them. I don't want to talk about them as breeds. I want to talk about them as personalities.''


By Alexa Keefe


https://www.nationalgeographic.com/photography/proof/2018/february/musi-dog-portraits

PUBLISHED February 6, 2018

Question 14 14. Which of the following best identifies the sentence, ''I don't want to talk about them as breeds. I want to talk about them as personalities.''

Question 15 15. What is the purpose of comparing and contrasting two items?

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NES Essential Academic Skills Reading Subtest 1 (001): Practice & Study Guide Final Free Practice Test Instructions

Choose your answer to the question and click 'Continue' to see how you did. Then click 'Next Question' to answer the next question. When you have completed the free practice test, click 'View Results' to see your results. Good luck!

NES Essential Academic Skills Reading Subtest 1 (001): Practice & Study Guide  /  NES Prep
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