NES Essential Academic Skills: Study Guide & Practice Final Exam

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Use this material to answer questions #1 through #3

From a child I was fond of reading, and all the little money that came

into my hands was ever laid out in books. Pleased with the _Pilgrim's

Progress_, my first collection was of John Bunyan's works in separate

little volumes. I afterward sold them to enable me to buy R. Burton's

_Historical Collections_; they were small chapmen's books,[16] and

cheap, 40 or 50 in all. My father's little library consisted chiefly

of books in polemic divinity, most of which I read, and have since

often regretted that, at a time when I had such a thirst for

knowledge, more proper books had not fallen in my way, since it was

now resolved I should not be a clergyman. Plutarch's _Lives_ there was

in which I read abundantly, and I still think that time spent to great

advantage. There was also a book of DeFoe's, called an _Essay on

Projects_, and another of Dr. Mather's, called _Essays to do Good_,

which perhaps gave me a turn of thinking that had an influence on

some of the principal future events of my life.

[16] Small books, sold by chapmen or peddlers.

This bookish inclination at length determined my father to make me a

printer, though he had already one son (James) of that profession. In

1717 my brother James returned from England with a press and letters

to set up his business in Boston. I liked it much better than that of

my father, but still had a hankering for the sea. To prevent the

apprehended effect of such an inclination, my father was impatient to

have me bound to my brother. I stood out some time, but at last was

persuaded, and signed the indentures when I was yet but twelve years

old. I was to serve as an apprentice till I was twenty-one years of

age, only I was to be allowed journeyman's wages during the last year.

In a little time I made great proficiency in the business, and became

a useful hand to my brother. I now had access to better books. An

acquaintance with the apprentices of booksellers enabled me sometimes

to borrow a small one, which I was careful to return soon and clean.

Often I sat up in my room reading the greatest part of the night, when

the book was borrowed in the evening and to be returned early in the

morning, lest it should be missed or wanted.

And after some time an ingenious tradesman, Mr. Matthew Adams, who

had a pretty collection of books, and who frequented our

printing-house, took notice of me, invited me to his library, and

very kindly lent me such books as I chose to read. I now took a fancy

to poetry, and made some little pieces; my brother, thinking it might

turn to account, encouraged me, and put me on composing occasional

ballads. One was called _The Lighthouse Tragedy_, and contained an

account of the drowning of Captain Worthilake, with his two daughters:

the other was a sailor's song, on the taking of _Teach_ (or

Blackbeard) the pirate. They were wretched stuff, in the

Grub-street-ballad style;[17] and when they were printed he sent me

about the town to sell them. The first sold wonderfully, the event

being recent, having made a great noise. This flattered my vanity; but

my father discouraged me by ridiculing my performances, and telling me

verse-makers were generally beggars. So I escaped being a poet, most

probably a very bad one; but as prose writing has been of great use to

me in the course of my life, and was a principal means of my

advancement, I shall tell you how, in such a situation, I acquired

what little ability I have in that way.

[17] Grub-street: famous in English literature as the

home of poor writers.

There was another bookish lad in the town, John Collins by name, with

whom I was intimately acquainted. We sometimes disputed, and very fond

we were of argument, and very desirous of confuting one another,

which disputatious turn, by the way, is apt to become a very bad

habit, making people often extremely disagreeable in company by the

contradiction that is necessary to bring it into practice; and thence,

besides souring and spoiling the conversation, is productive of

disgusts and, perhaps enmities where you may have occasion for

friendship. I had caught it by reading my father's books of dispute

about religion. Persons of good sense, I have since observed, seldom

fall into it, except lawyers, university men, and men of all sorts

that have been bred at Edinborough.

A question was once, somehow or other, started between Collins and me,

of the propriety of educating the female sex in learning, and their

abilities for study. He was of opinion that it was improper, and that

they were naturally unequal to it. I took the contrary side, perhaps a

little for dispute's sake. He was naturally more eloquent, had a ready

plenty of words, and sometimes, as I thought, bore me down more by his

fluency than by the strength of his reasons. As we parted without

settling the point, and were not to see one another again for some

time, I sat down to put my arguments in writing, which I copied fair

and sent to him. He answered, and I replied. Three or four letters of

a side had passed, when my father happened to find my papers and read

them. Without entering into the discussion, he took occasion to talk

to me about the manner of my writing; observed that, though I had the

advantage of my antagonist in correct spelling and pointing (which I

ow'd to the printing-house), I fell far short in elegance of

expression, in method and in perspicuity, of which he convinced me by

several instances. I saw the justice of his remarks, and thence grew

more attentive to the manner in writing, and determined to endeavor at

improvement.

About this time I met with an odd volume of the _Spectator_.[18] It was

the third. I had never before seen any of them. I bought it, read it

over and over, and was much delighted with it. I thought the writing

excellent, and wished, if possible, to imitate it. With this view I

took some of the papers, and, making short hints of the sentiment in

each sentence, laid them by a few days, and then, without looking at

the book, try'd to compleat the papers again, by expressing each

hinted sentiment at length, and as fully as it had been expressed

before, in any suitable words that should come to hand. Then I

compared my _Spectator_ with the original, discovered some of my

faults, and corrected them. But I found I wanted a stock of words, or

a readiness in recollecting and using them, which I thought I should

have acquired before that time if I had gone on making verses; since

the continual occasion for words of the same import, but of different

length, to suit the measure, or of different sound for the rhyme,

would have laid me under a constant necessity of searching for

variety, and also have tended to fix that variety in my mind, and make

me master of it. Therefore I took some of the tales and turned them

into verse; and, after a time, when I had pretty well forgotten the

prose, turned them back again. I also sometimes jumbled my collections

of hints into confusion, and after some weeks endeavored to reduce

them into the best order, before I began to form the full sentences

and compleat the paper. This was to teach me method in the arrangement

of thoughts. By comparing my work afterwards with the original, I

discovered many faults and amended them; but I sometimes had the

pleasure of fancying that, in certain particulars of small import, I

had been lucky enough to improve the method of the language, and this

encouraged me to think I might possibly in time come to be a tolerable

English writer, of which I was extremely ambitious. My time for these

exercises and for reading was at night, after work or before it began

in the morning, or on Sundays, when I contrived to be in the

printing-house alone, evading as much as I could the common attendance

on public worship which my father used to exact of me when I was under

his care, and which indeed I still thought a duty, thought I could

not, as it seemed to me, afford time to practise it.

[18] A daily London journal, comprising satirical essays

on social subjects, published by Addison and Steele in

1711-1712. The _Spectator_ and its predecessor, the

_Tatler_ (1709), marked the beginning of periodical

literature.

When about 16 years of age I happened to meet with a book, written by

one Tryon, recommending a vegetable diet. I determined to go into it.

My brother, being yet unmarried, did not keep house, but boarded

himself and his apprentices in another family. My refusing to eat

flesh occasioned an inconveniency, and I was frequently chid for my

singularity. I made myself acquainted with Tryon's manner of preparing

some of his dishes, such as boiling potatoes or rice, making hasty

pudding, and a few others, and then proposed to my brother, that if he

would give me, weekly, half the money he paid for my board, I would

board myself. He instantly agreed to it, and I presently found that I

could save half what he paid me. This was an additional fund for

buying books. But I had another advantage in it. My brother and the

rest going from the printing-house to their meals, I remained there

alone, and, dispatching presently my light repast, which often was no

more than a bisket or a slice of bread, a handful of raisins or a tart

from the pastry-cook's, and a glass of water, had the rest of the time

till their return for study, in which I made the greater progress,

from that greater clearness of head and quicker apprehension which

usually attend temperance in eating and drinking.

And now it was that, being on some occasion made asham'd of my

ignorance in figures, which I had twice failed in learning when at

school, I took Cocker's book of Arithmetick, and went through the

whole by myself with great ease. I also read Seller's and Shermy's

books of Navigation, and became acquainted with the little geometry

they contain; but never proceeded far in that science.

Question 1 1. According to the passage from his autobipography, which is true of Benjamin Franklin?

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #3

From a child I was fond of reading, and all the little money that came

into my hands was ever laid out in books. Pleased with the _Pilgrim's

Progress_, my first collection was of John Bunyan's works in separate

little volumes. I afterward sold them to enable me to buy R. Burton's

_Historical Collections_; they were small chapmen's books,[16] and

cheap, 40 or 50 in all. My father's little library consisted chiefly

of books in polemic divinity, most of which I read, and have since

often regretted that, at a time when I had such a thirst for

knowledge, more proper books had not fallen in my way, since it was

now resolved I should not be a clergyman. Plutarch's _Lives_ there was

in which I read abundantly, and I still think that time spent to great

advantage. There was also a book of DeFoe's, called an _Essay on

Projects_, and another of Dr. Mather's, called _Essays to do Good_,

which perhaps gave me a turn of thinking that had an influence on

some of the principal future events of my life.

[16] Small books, sold by chapmen or peddlers.

This bookish inclination at length determined my father to make me a

printer, though he had already one son (James) of that profession. In

1717 my brother James returned from England with a press and letters

to set up his business in Boston. I liked it much better than that of

my father, but still had a hankering for the sea. To prevent the

apprehended effect of such an inclination, my father was impatient to

have me bound to my brother. I stood out some time, but at last was

persuaded, and signed the indentures when I was yet but twelve years

old. I was to serve as an apprentice till I was twenty-one years of

age, only I was to be allowed journeyman's wages during the last year.

In a little time I made great proficiency in the business, and became

a useful hand to my brother. I now had access to better books. An

acquaintance with the apprentices of booksellers enabled me sometimes

to borrow a small one, which I was careful to return soon and clean.

Often I sat up in my room reading the greatest part of the night, when

the book was borrowed in the evening and to be returned early in the

morning, lest it should be missed or wanted.

And after some time an ingenious tradesman, Mr. Matthew Adams, who

had a pretty collection of books, and who frequented our

printing-house, took notice of me, invited me to his library, and

very kindly lent me such books as I chose to read. I now took a fancy

to poetry, and made some little pieces; my brother, thinking it might

turn to account, encouraged me, and put me on composing occasional

ballads. One was called _The Lighthouse Tragedy_, and contained an

account of the drowning of Captain Worthilake, with his two daughters:

the other was a sailor's song, on the taking of _Teach_ (or

Blackbeard) the pirate. They were wretched stuff, in the

Grub-street-ballad style;[17] and when they were printed he sent me

about the town to sell them. The first sold wonderfully, the event

being recent, having made a great noise. This flattered my vanity; but

my father discouraged me by ridiculing my performances, and telling me

verse-makers were generally beggars. So I escaped being a poet, most

probably a very bad one; but as prose writing has been of great use to

me in the course of my life, and was a principal means of my

advancement, I shall tell you how, in such a situation, I acquired

what little ability I have in that way.

[17] Grub-street: famous in English literature as the

home of poor writers.

There was another bookish lad in the town, John Collins by name, with

whom I was intimately acquainted. We sometimes disputed, and very fond

we were of argument, and very desirous of confuting one another,

which disputatious turn, by the way, is apt to become a very bad

habit, making people often extremely disagreeable in company by the

contradiction that is necessary to bring it into practice; and thence,

besides souring and spoiling the conversation, is productive of

disgusts and, perhaps enmities where you may have occasion for

friendship. I had caught it by reading my father's books of dispute

about religion. Persons of good sense, I have since observed, seldom

fall into it, except lawyers, university men, and men of all sorts

that have been bred at Edinborough.

A question was once, somehow or other, started between Collins and me,

of the propriety of educating the female sex in learning, and their

abilities for study. He was of opinion that it was improper, and that

they were naturally unequal to it. I took the contrary side, perhaps a

little for dispute's sake. He was naturally more eloquent, had a ready

plenty of words, and sometimes, as I thought, bore me down more by his

fluency than by the strength of his reasons. As we parted without

settling the point, and were not to see one another again for some

time, I sat down to put my arguments in writing, which I copied fair

and sent to him. He answered, and I replied. Three or four letters of

a side had passed, when my father happened to find my papers and read

them. Without entering into the discussion, he took occasion to talk

to me about the manner of my writing; observed that, though I had the

advantage of my antagonist in correct spelling and pointing (which I

ow'd to the printing-house), I fell far short in elegance of

expression, in method and in perspicuity, of which he convinced me by

several instances. I saw the justice of his remarks, and thence grew

more attentive to the manner in writing, and determined to endeavor at

improvement.

About this time I met with an odd volume of the _Spectator_.[18] It was

the third. I had never before seen any of them. I bought it, read it

over and over, and was much delighted with it. I thought the writing

excellent, and wished, if possible, to imitate it. With this view I

took some of the papers, and, making short hints of the sentiment in

each sentence, laid them by a few days, and then, without looking at

the book, try'd to compleat the papers again, by expressing each

hinted sentiment at length, and as fully as it had been expressed

before, in any suitable words that should come to hand. Then I

compared my _Spectator_ with the original, discovered some of my

faults, and corrected them. But I found I wanted a stock of words, or

a readiness in recollecting and using them, which I thought I should

have acquired before that time if I had gone on making verses; since

the continual occasion for words of the same import, but of different

length, to suit the measure, or of different sound for the rhyme,

would have laid me under a constant necessity of searching for

variety, and also have tended to fix that variety in my mind, and make

me master of it. Therefore I took some of the tales and turned them

into verse; and, after a time, when I had pretty well forgotten the

prose, turned them back again. I also sometimes jumbled my collections

of hints into confusion, and after some weeks endeavored to reduce

them into the best order, before I began to form the full sentences

and compleat the paper. This was to teach me method in the arrangement

of thoughts. By comparing my work afterwards with the original, I

discovered many faults and amended them; but I sometimes had the

pleasure of fancying that, in certain particulars of small import, I

had been lucky enough to improve the method of the language, and this

encouraged me to think I might possibly in time come to be a tolerable

English writer, of which I was extremely ambitious. My time for these

exercises and for reading was at night, after work or before it began

in the morning, or on Sundays, when I contrived to be in the

printing-house alone, evading as much as I could the common attendance

on public worship which my father used to exact of me when I was under

his care, and which indeed I still thought a duty, thought I could

not, as it seemed to me, afford time to practise it.

[18] A daily London journal, comprising satirical essays

on social subjects, published by Addison and Steele in

1711-1712. The _Spectator_ and its predecessor, the

_Tatler_ (1709), marked the beginning of periodical

literature.

When about 16 years of age I happened to meet with a book, written by

one Tryon, recommending a vegetable diet. I determined to go into it.

My brother, being yet unmarried, did not keep house, but boarded

himself and his apprentices in another family. My refusing to eat

flesh occasioned an inconveniency, and I was frequently chid for my

singularity. I made myself acquainted with Tryon's manner of preparing

some of his dishes, such as boiling potatoes or rice, making hasty

pudding, and a few others, and then proposed to my brother, that if he

would give me, weekly, half the money he paid for my board, I would

board myself. He instantly agreed to it, and I presently found that I

could save half what he paid me. This was an additional fund for

buying books. But I had another advantage in it. My brother and the

rest going from the printing-house to their meals, I remained there

alone, and, dispatching presently my light repast, which often was no

more than a bisket or a slice of bread, a handful of raisins or a tart

from the pastry-cook's, and a glass of water, had the rest of the time

till their return for study, in which I made the greater progress,

from that greater clearness of head and quicker apprehension which

usually attend temperance in eating and drinking.

And now it was that, being on some occasion made asham'd of my

ignorance in figures, which I had twice failed in learning when at

school, I took Cocker's book of Arithmetick, and went through the

whole by myself with great ease. I also read Seller's and Shermy's

books of Navigation, and became acquainted with the little geometry

they contain; but never proceeded far in that science.

Question 2 2. Franklin concocted a plan, with the indirect help of his brother, to _____.

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #3

From a child I was fond of reading, and all the little money that came

into my hands was ever laid out in books. Pleased with the _Pilgrim's

Progress_, my first collection was of John Bunyan's works in separate

little volumes. I afterward sold them to enable me to buy R. Burton's

_Historical Collections_; they were small chapmen's books,[16] and

cheap, 40 or 50 in all. My father's little library consisted chiefly

of books in polemic divinity, most of which I read, and have since

often regretted that, at a time when I had such a thirst for

knowledge, more proper books had not fallen in my way, since it was

now resolved I should not be a clergyman. Plutarch's _Lives_ there was

in which I read abundantly, and I still think that time spent to great

advantage. There was also a book of DeFoe's, called an _Essay on

Projects_, and another of Dr. Mather's, called _Essays to do Good_,

which perhaps gave me a turn of thinking that had an influence on

some of the principal future events of my life.

[16] Small books, sold by chapmen or peddlers.

This bookish inclination at length determined my father to make me a

printer, though he had already one son (James) of that profession. In

1717 my brother James returned from England with a press and letters

to set up his business in Boston. I liked it much better than that of

my father, but still had a hankering for the sea. To prevent the

apprehended effect of such an inclination, my father was impatient to

have me bound to my brother. I stood out some time, but at last was

persuaded, and signed the indentures when I was yet but twelve years

old. I was to serve as an apprentice till I was twenty-one years of

age, only I was to be allowed journeyman's wages during the last year.

In a little time I made great proficiency in the business, and became

a useful hand to my brother. I now had access to better books. An

acquaintance with the apprentices of booksellers enabled me sometimes

to borrow a small one, which I was careful to return soon and clean.

Often I sat up in my room reading the greatest part of the night, when

the book was borrowed in the evening and to be returned early in the

morning, lest it should be missed or wanted.

And after some time an ingenious tradesman, Mr. Matthew Adams, who

had a pretty collection of books, and who frequented our

printing-house, took notice of me, invited me to his library, and

very kindly lent me such books as I chose to read. I now took a fancy

to poetry, and made some little pieces; my brother, thinking it might

turn to account, encouraged me, and put me on composing occasional

ballads. One was called _The Lighthouse Tragedy_, and contained an

account of the drowning of Captain Worthilake, with his two daughters:

the other was a sailor's song, on the taking of _Teach_ (or

Blackbeard) the pirate. They were wretched stuff, in the

Grub-street-ballad style;[17] and when they were printed he sent me

about the town to sell them. The first sold wonderfully, the event

being recent, having made a great noise. This flattered my vanity; but

my father discouraged me by ridiculing my performances, and telling me

verse-makers were generally beggars. So I escaped being a poet, most

probably a very bad one; but as prose writing has been of great use to

me in the course of my life, and was a principal means of my

advancement, I shall tell you how, in such a situation, I acquired

what little ability I have in that way.

[17] Grub-street: famous in English literature as the

home of poor writers.

There was another bookish lad in the town, John Collins by name, with

whom I was intimately acquainted. We sometimes disputed, and very fond

we were of argument, and very desirous of confuting one another,

which disputatious turn, by the way, is apt to become a very bad

habit, making people often extremely disagreeable in company by the

contradiction that is necessary to bring it into practice; and thence,

besides souring and spoiling the conversation, is productive of

disgusts and, perhaps enmities where you may have occasion for

friendship. I had caught it by reading my father's books of dispute

about religion. Persons of good sense, I have since observed, seldom

fall into it, except lawyers, university men, and men of all sorts

that have been bred at Edinborough.

A question was once, somehow or other, started between Collins and me,

of the propriety of educating the female sex in learning, and their

abilities for study. He was of opinion that it was improper, and that

they were naturally unequal to it. I took the contrary side, perhaps a

little for dispute's sake. He was naturally more eloquent, had a ready

plenty of words, and sometimes, as I thought, bore me down more by his

fluency than by the strength of his reasons. As we parted without

settling the point, and were not to see one another again for some

time, I sat down to put my arguments in writing, which I copied fair

and sent to him. He answered, and I replied. Three or four letters of

a side had passed, when my father happened to find my papers and read

them. Without entering into the discussion, he took occasion to talk

to me about the manner of my writing; observed that, though I had the

advantage of my antagonist in correct spelling and pointing (which I

ow'd to the printing-house), I fell far short in elegance of

expression, in method and in perspicuity, of which he convinced me by

several instances. I saw the justice of his remarks, and thence grew

more attentive to the manner in writing, and determined to endeavor at

improvement.

About this time I met with an odd volume of the _Spectator_.[18] It was

the third. I had never before seen any of them. I bought it, read it

over and over, and was much delighted with it. I thought the writing

excellent, and wished, if possible, to imitate it. With this view I

took some of the papers, and, making short hints of the sentiment in

each sentence, laid them by a few days, and then, without looking at

the book, try'd to compleat the papers again, by expressing each

hinted sentiment at length, and as fully as it had been expressed

before, in any suitable words that should come to hand. Then I

compared my _Spectator_ with the original, discovered some of my

faults, and corrected them. But I found I wanted a stock of words, or

a readiness in recollecting and using them, which I thought I should

have acquired before that time if I had gone on making verses; since

the continual occasion for words of the same import, but of different

length, to suit the measure, or of different sound for the rhyme,

would have laid me under a constant necessity of searching for

variety, and also have tended to fix that variety in my mind, and make

me master of it. Therefore I took some of the tales and turned them

into verse; and, after a time, when I had pretty well forgotten the

prose, turned them back again. I also sometimes jumbled my collections

of hints into confusion, and after some weeks endeavored to reduce

them into the best order, before I began to form the full sentences

and compleat the paper. This was to teach me method in the arrangement

of thoughts. By comparing my work afterwards with the original, I

discovered many faults and amended them; but I sometimes had the

pleasure of fancying that, in certain particulars of small import, I

had been lucky enough to improve the method of the language, and this

encouraged me to think I might possibly in time come to be a tolerable

English writer, of which I was extremely ambitious. My time for these

exercises and for reading was at night, after work or before it began

in the morning, or on Sundays, when I contrived to be in the

printing-house alone, evading as much as I could the common attendance

on public worship which my father used to exact of me when I was under

his care, and which indeed I still thought a duty, thought I could

not, as it seemed to me, afford time to practise it.

[18] A daily London journal, comprising satirical essays

on social subjects, published by Addison and Steele in

1711-1712. The _Spectator_ and its predecessor, the

_Tatler_ (1709), marked the beginning of periodical

literature.

When about 16 years of age I happened to meet with a book, written by

one Tryon, recommending a vegetable diet. I determined to go into it.

My brother, being yet unmarried, did not keep house, but boarded

himself and his apprentices in another family. My refusing to eat

flesh occasioned an inconveniency, and I was frequently chid for my

singularity. I made myself acquainted with Tryon's manner of preparing

some of his dishes, such as boiling potatoes or rice, making hasty

pudding, and a few others, and then proposed to my brother, that if he

would give me, weekly, half the money he paid for my board, I would

board myself. He instantly agreed to it, and I presently found that I

could save half what he paid me. This was an additional fund for

buying books. But I had another advantage in it. My brother and the

rest going from the printing-house to their meals, I remained there

alone, and, dispatching presently my light repast, which often was no

more than a bisket or a slice of bread, a handful of raisins or a tart

from the pastry-cook's, and a glass of water, had the rest of the time

till their return for study, in which I made the greater progress,

from that greater clearness of head and quicker apprehension which

usually attend temperance in eating and drinking.

And now it was that, being on some occasion made asham'd of my

ignorance in figures, which I had twice failed in learning when at

school, I took Cocker's book of Arithmetick, and went through the

whole by myself with great ease. I also read Seller's and Shermy's

books of Navigation, and became acquainted with the little geometry

they contain; but never proceeded far in that science.

Question 3 3. Which of the following trades did Frankiln's father insist he become a part of?

Question 4 4. In which of the following locations would you plug in a network cable?

Question 5 5. Which of the following punctuation marks is utilized to separate two independent clauses from one another?

Question 6 6. Which of the following numbers is considered a whole number, but is NOT considered a natural number?

Question 7 7.

In the following sentence, where would you place a comma?


During the day we went to see a movie and visited the park.

Question 8 8. One angle of a triangle is 40 degrees and another angle is 36 degrees. What is the measurement of the third angle?

Question 9 9. When determining an adult's weight in metric units, which choice is most appropriate?

Question 10 10. Which of the following is designed to store information on a central server?

Question 11 11.

In the given sentence, which part is considered a prepositional phrase?


Michael, Dawn, and Linda are excited because they live by the new neighbors.

Question 12 12. When utilizing pronouns such as 'you' and 'yours,' which point of view is being used?

Question 13 13. This type of data structure allows for the insertion or deletion of elements at the top and is known as:

Question 14 14.

In the following, which number is located in the tenths place?


7,804,132.96

Question 15 15. Which of the following allows one to look closely at complete texts in an organized manner?

Tell us about yourself

Are you a student or a teacher?

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NES Essential Academic Skills: Study Guide & Practice Final Free Practice Test Instructions

Choose your answer to the question and click 'Continue' to see how you did. Then click 'Next Question' to answer the next question. When you have completed the free practice test, click 'View Results' to see your results. Good luck!

NES Essential Academic Skills: Study Guide & Practice  /  NES Prep
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