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NES Middle Grades English Language Arts (201): Practice & Study Guide Final Exam

Free Practice Test Instructions:

Choose your answer to the question and click 'Continue' to see how you did. Then click 'Next Question' to answer the next question. When you have completed the free practice test, click 'View Results' to see your results. Good luck!

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #2

Read the passage from Nature by Ralph Waldo Emerson and answer the following:

To go into solitude, a man needs to retire as much from his chamber

as from society. I am not solitary whilst I read and write, though

nobody is with me. But, if a man would be alone, let him look at the

stars. The rays that come from those heavenly worlds, will separate

between him and what he touches. One might think the atmosphere

was made transparent with this design, to give man, in the heavenly

bodies, the perpetual presence of the sublime. Seen in the streets of

cities, how great they are! If the stars should appear one night in a

thousand years, how would men believe and adore; and preserve for

many generations the remembrance of the city of God which had

been shown! But, every night come out these envoys of beauty, and

light the universe with their admonishing smile.

The stars awaken a certain reverence, because though always present,

they are inaccessible; but all natural objects make a kindred

impression, when the mind is open to their influence. Nature never

wears a mean appearance. Neither does the wisest man extort her

secret, and lose his curiosity by finding out all her perfection. Nature

never became a toy to a wise spirit. The flowers, the animals, the

mountains, reflected the wisdom of his best hour, as much as they

had delighted the simplicity of his childhood.

When we speak of nature in this manner, we have a distinct but most

poetical sense in the mind. We mean the integrity of impression

made by manifold natural objects. It is this which distinguishes the

stick of timber of the wood-cutter, from the tree of the poet. The

charming landscape which I saw this morning, is indubitably made

up of some twenty or thirty farms. Miller owns this field, Locke that,

and Manning the woodland beyond. But none of them owns the

landscape. There is a property in the horizon which no man has but

he whose eye can integrate all the parts, that is, the poet. This is the

best part of these men's farms, yet to this their warranty-deeds give

no title.

To speak truly, few adult persons can see nature. Most persons do

not see the sun. At least they have a very superficial seeing. The sun

illuminates only the eye of the man, but shines into the eye and the

heart of the child. The lover of nature is he whose inward and

outward senses are still truly adjusted to each other; who has

retained the spirit of infancy even into the era of manhood. His

intercourse with heaven and earth, becomes part of his daily food. In

the presence of nature, a wild delight runs through the man, in spite

of real sorrows. Nature says, - he is my creature, and maugre all his

impertinent griefs, he shall be glad with me. Not the sun or the

summer alone, but every hour and season yields its tribute of delight;

for every hour and change corresponds to and authorizes a different

state of the mind, from breathless noon to grimmest midnight.

Nature is a setting that fits equally well a comic or a mourning piece.

In good health, the air is a cordial of incredible virtue. Crossing a

bare common, in snow puddles, at twilight, under a clouded sky,

without having in my thoughts any occurrence of special good

fortune, I have enjoyed a perfect exhilaration. I am glad to the brink

of fear. In the woods too, a man casts off his years, as the snake his

slough, and at what period soever of life, is always a child. In the

woods, is perpetual youth. Within these plantations of God, a

decorum and sanctity reign, a perennial festival is dressed, and the

guest sees not how he should tire of them in a thousand years. In the

woods, we return to reason and faith. There I feel that nothing can

befall me in life,--no disgrace, no calamity, (leaving me my eyes,)

which nature cannot repair. Standing on the bare ground, - my head

bathed by the blithe air, and uplifted into infinite space, - all mean

egotism vanishes. I become a transparent eye-ball; I am nothing; I

see all; the currents of the Universal Being circulate through me; I

am part or particle of God. The name of the nearest friend sounds

then foreign and accidental: to be brothers, to be acquaintances,

--master or servant, is then a trifle and a disturbance. I am the lover of

uncontained and immortal beauty. In the wilderness, I find

something more dear and connate than in streets or villages. In the

tranquil landscape, and especially in the distant line of the horizon,

man beholds somewhat as beautiful as his own nature.

Question 1 1. Which point of view is the passage written in?

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #2

Read the passage from Nature by Ralph Waldo Emerson and answer the following:

To go into solitude, a man needs to retire as much from his chamber

as from society. I am not solitary whilst I read and write, though

nobody is with me. But, if a man would be alone, let him look at the

stars. The rays that come from those heavenly worlds, will separate

between him and what he touches. One might think the atmosphere

was made transparent with this design, to give man, in the heavenly

bodies, the perpetual presence of the sublime. Seen in the streets of

cities, how great they are! If the stars should appear one night in a

thousand years, how would men believe and adore; and preserve for

many generations the remembrance of the city of God which had

been shown! But, every night come out these envoys of beauty, and

light the universe with their admonishing smile.

The stars awaken a certain reverence, because though always present,

they are inaccessible; but all natural objects make a kindred

impression, when the mind is open to their influence. Nature never

wears a mean appearance. Neither does the wisest man extort her

secret, and lose his curiosity by finding out all her perfection. Nature

never became a toy to a wise spirit. The flowers, the animals, the

mountains, reflected the wisdom of his best hour, as much as they

had delighted the simplicity of his childhood.

When we speak of nature in this manner, we have a distinct but most

poetical sense in the mind. We mean the integrity of impression

made by manifold natural objects. It is this which distinguishes the

stick of timber of the wood-cutter, from the tree of the poet. The

charming landscape which I saw this morning, is indubitably made

up of some twenty or thirty farms. Miller owns this field, Locke that,

and Manning the woodland beyond. But none of them owns the

landscape. There is a property in the horizon which no man has but

he whose eye can integrate all the parts, that is, the poet. This is the

best part of these men's farms, yet to this their warranty-deeds give

no title.

To speak truly, few adult persons can see nature. Most persons do

not see the sun. At least they have a very superficial seeing. The sun

illuminates only the eye of the man, but shines into the eye and the

heart of the child. The lover of nature is he whose inward and

outward senses are still truly adjusted to each other; who has

retained the spirit of infancy even into the era of manhood. His

intercourse with heaven and earth, becomes part of his daily food. In

the presence of nature, a wild delight runs through the man, in spite

of real sorrows. Nature says, - he is my creature, and maugre all his

impertinent griefs, he shall be glad with me. Not the sun or the

summer alone, but every hour and season yields its tribute of delight;

for every hour and change corresponds to and authorizes a different

state of the mind, from breathless noon to grimmest midnight.

Nature is a setting that fits equally well a comic or a mourning piece.

In good health, the air is a cordial of incredible virtue. Crossing a

bare common, in snow puddles, at twilight, under a clouded sky,

without having in my thoughts any occurrence of special good

fortune, I have enjoyed a perfect exhilaration. I am glad to the brink

of fear. In the woods too, a man casts off his years, as the snake his

slough, and at what period soever of life, is always a child. In the

woods, is perpetual youth. Within these plantations of God, a

decorum and sanctity reign, a perennial festival is dressed, and the

guest sees not how he should tire of them in a thousand years. In the

woods, we return to reason and faith. There I feel that nothing can

befall me in life,--no disgrace, no calamity, (leaving me my eyes,)

which nature cannot repair. Standing on the bare ground, - my head

bathed by the blithe air, and uplifted into infinite space, - all mean

egotism vanishes. I become a transparent eye-ball; I am nothing; I

see all; the currents of the Universal Being circulate through me; I

am part or particle of God. The name of the nearest friend sounds

then foreign and accidental: to be brothers, to be acquaintances,

--master or servant, is then a trifle and a disturbance. I am the lover of

uncontained and immortal beauty. In the wilderness, I find

something more dear and connate than in streets or villages. In the

tranquil landscape, and especially in the distant line of the horizon,

man beholds somewhat as beautiful as his own nature.

Question 2 2.

In the following sentence, what does the term ''kindred'' mean?


The stars awaken a certain reverence, because though always present, they are inaccessible; but all natural objects make a kindred impression, when the mind is open to their influence.

Question 3 3. Mark's writing assignment follows the rubric his teacher provided in class. It contains a thesis with a central argument, a topic with multiple viewpoints, and a call to action. Mark's essay is:

Question 4 4. The strategy a student can utilize to guess at the meaning of an unfamiliar word by breaking it down into separate parts is known as what?

Question 5 5.

How is the word ''behind'' used in the following sentence?


They took a trip to the store and walked behind the movie theater.

Use this material to answer questions #6 through #9

Read ''The Straw, the Coal, and the Bean,'' and answer the questions that follow.

In a village dwelt a poor old woman, who had gathered together a dish

of beans and wanted to cook them. So she made a fire on her hearth, and

that it might burn the quicker, she lighted it with a handful of straw.

When she was emptying the beans into the pan, one dropped without her

observing it, and lay on the ground beside a straw, and soon afterwards

a burning coal from the fire leapt down to the two. Then, the straw

began and said: ''Dear friends, from whence do you come here?'' The coal

replied: ''I fortunately sprang out of the fire, and if I had not escaped

by sheer force, my death would have been certain, - I should have been

burnt to ashes.'' The bean said: ''I too have escaped with a whole skin,

but if the old woman had got me into the pan, I should have been made

into broth without any mercy, like my comrades.'' ''And would a better

fate have fallen to my lot?'' said the straw. ''The old woman has

destroyed all my brethren in fire and smoke; she seized sixty of them at

once, and took their lives. I luckily slipped through her fingers.''

''But, what are we to do now?'' said the coal.

''I think,'' answered the bean, ''that as we have so fortunately escaped

death, we should keep together like good companions, and lest a new

mischance should overtake us here, we should go away together, and

repair to a foreign country.''

The proposition pleased the two others, and they set out on their way

together. Soon, however, they came to a little brook, and as there was

no bridge or foot-plank, they did not know how they were to get over

it. The straw hit on a good idea, and said: ''I will lay myself straight

across, and then you can walk over on me as on a bridge.'' The straw

therefore stretched itself from one bank to the other, and the coal,

who was of an impetuous disposition, tripped quite boldly on to the

newly-built bridge. But, when she had reached the middle, and heard the

water rushing beneath her, she was after all, afraid, and stood still,

and ventured no farther. The straw, however, began to burn, broke in

two pieces, and fell into the stream. The coal slipped after her, hissed

when she got into the water, and breathed her last. The bean, who had

prudently stayed behind on the shore, could not but laugh at the event,

was unable to stop, and laughed so heartily that she burst. It would

have been all over with her, likewise, if, by good fortune, a tailor who

was travelling in search of work, had not sat down to rest by the brook.

As he had a compassionate heart he pulled out his needle and thread,

and sewed her together. The bean thanked him most prettily, but as the

tailor used black thread, all beans since then have a black seam.

Question 6 6. Why is the tailor thought to be compassionate?

Use this material to answer questions #6 through #9

Read ''The Straw, the Coal, and the Bean,'' and answer the questions that follow.

In a village dwelt a poor old woman, who had gathered together a dish

of beans and wanted to cook them. So she made a fire on her hearth, and

that it might burn the quicker, she lighted it with a handful of straw.

When she was emptying the beans into the pan, one dropped without her

observing it, and lay on the ground beside a straw, and soon afterwards

a burning coal from the fire leapt down to the two. Then, the straw

began and said: ''Dear friends, from whence do you come here?'' The coal

replied: ''I fortunately sprang out of the fire, and if I had not escaped

by sheer force, my death would have been certain, - I should have been

burnt to ashes.'' The bean said: ''I too have escaped with a whole skin,

but if the old woman had got me into the pan, I should have been made

into broth without any mercy, like my comrades.'' ''And would a better

fate have fallen to my lot?'' said the straw. ''The old woman has

destroyed all my brethren in fire and smoke; she seized sixty of them at

once, and took their lives. I luckily slipped through her fingers.''

''But, what are we to do now?'' said the coal.

''I think,'' answered the bean, ''that as we have so fortunately escaped

death, we should keep together like good companions, and lest a new

mischance should overtake us here, we should go away together, and

repair to a foreign country.''

The proposition pleased the two others, and they set out on their way

together. Soon, however, they came to a little brook, and as there was

no bridge or foot-plank, they did not know how they were to get over

it. The straw hit on a good idea, and said: ''I will lay myself straight

across, and then you can walk over on me as on a bridge.'' The straw

therefore stretched itself from one bank to the other, and the coal,

who was of an impetuous disposition, tripped quite boldly on to the

newly-built bridge. But, when she had reached the middle, and heard the

water rushing beneath her, she was after all, afraid, and stood still,

and ventured no farther. The straw, however, began to burn, broke in

two pieces, and fell into the stream. The coal slipped after her, hissed

when she got into the water, and breathed her last. The bean, who had

prudently stayed behind on the shore, could not but laugh at the event,

was unable to stop, and laughed so heartily that she burst. It would

have been all over with her, likewise, if, by good fortune, a tailor who

was travelling in search of work, had not sat down to rest by the brook.

As he had a compassionate heart he pulled out his needle and thread,

and sewed her together. The bean thanked him most prettily, but as the

tailor used black thread, all beans since then have a black seam.

Question 7 7. Why does the bean believe that he, the straw, and the coal should stick together?

Use this material to answer questions #6 through #9

Read ''The Straw, the Coal, and the Bean,'' and answer the questions that follow.

In a village dwelt a poor old woman, who had gathered together a dish

of beans and wanted to cook them. So she made a fire on her hearth, and

that it might burn the quicker, she lighted it with a handful of straw.

When she was emptying the beans into the pan, one dropped without her

observing it, and lay on the ground beside a straw, and soon afterwards

a burning coal from the fire leapt down to the two. Then, the straw

began and said: ''Dear friends, from whence do you come here?'' The coal

replied: ''I fortunately sprang out of the fire, and if I had not escaped

by sheer force, my death would have been certain, - I should have been

burnt to ashes.'' The bean said: ''I too have escaped with a whole skin,

but if the old woman had got me into the pan, I should have been made

into broth without any mercy, like my comrades.'' ''And would a better

fate have fallen to my lot?'' said the straw. ''The old woman has

destroyed all my brethren in fire and smoke; she seized sixty of them at

once, and took their lives. I luckily slipped through her fingers.''

''But, what are we to do now?'' said the coal.

''I think,'' answered the bean, ''that as we have so fortunately escaped

death, we should keep together like good companions, and lest a new

mischance should overtake us here, we should go away together, and

repair to a foreign country.''

The proposition pleased the two others, and they set out on their way

together. Soon, however, they came to a little brook, and as there was

no bridge or foot-plank, they did not know how they were to get over

it. The straw hit on a good idea, and said: ''I will lay myself straight

across, and then you can walk over on me as on a bridge.'' The straw

therefore stretched itself from one bank to the other, and the coal,

who was of an impetuous disposition, tripped quite boldly on to the

newly-built bridge. But, when she had reached the middle, and heard the

water rushing beneath her, she was after all, afraid, and stood still,

and ventured no farther. The straw, however, began to burn, broke in

two pieces, and fell into the stream. The coal slipped after her, hissed

when she got into the water, and breathed her last. The bean, who had

prudently stayed behind on the shore, could not but laugh at the event,

was unable to stop, and laughed so heartily that she burst. It would

have been all over with her, likewise, if, by good fortune, a tailor who

was travelling in search of work, had not sat down to rest by the brook.

As he had a compassionate heart he pulled out his needle and thread,

and sewed her together. The bean thanked him most prettily, but as the

tailor used black thread, all beans since then have a black seam.

Question 8 8. Which character trait accurately describes the bean?

Use this material to answer questions #6 through #9

Read ''The Straw, the Coal, and the Bean,'' and answer the questions that follow.

In a village dwelt a poor old woman, who had gathered together a dish

of beans and wanted to cook them. So she made a fire on her hearth, and

that it might burn the quicker, she lighted it with a handful of straw.

When she was emptying the beans into the pan, one dropped without her

observing it, and lay on the ground beside a straw, and soon afterwards

a burning coal from the fire leapt down to the two. Then, the straw

began and said: ''Dear friends, from whence do you come here?'' The coal

replied: ''I fortunately sprang out of the fire, and if I had not escaped

by sheer force, my death would have been certain, - I should have been

burnt to ashes.'' The bean said: ''I too have escaped with a whole skin,

but if the old woman had got me into the pan, I should have been made

into broth without any mercy, like my comrades.'' ''And would a better

fate have fallen to my lot?'' said the straw. ''The old woman has

destroyed all my brethren in fire and smoke; she seized sixty of them at

once, and took their lives. I luckily slipped through her fingers.''

''But, what are we to do now?'' said the coal.

''I think,'' answered the bean, ''that as we have so fortunately escaped

death, we should keep together like good companions, and lest a new

mischance should overtake us here, we should go away together, and

repair to a foreign country.''

The proposition pleased the two others, and they set out on their way

together. Soon, however, they came to a little brook, and as there was

no bridge or foot-plank, they did not know how they were to get over

it. The straw hit on a good idea, and said: ''I will lay myself straight

across, and then you can walk over on me as on a bridge.'' The straw

therefore stretched itself from one bank to the other, and the coal,

who was of an impetuous disposition, tripped quite boldly on to the

newly-built bridge. But, when she had reached the middle, and heard the

water rushing beneath her, she was after all, afraid, and stood still,

and ventured no farther. The straw, however, began to burn, broke in

two pieces, and fell into the stream. The coal slipped after her, hissed

when she got into the water, and breathed her last. The bean, who had

prudently stayed behind on the shore, could not but laugh at the event,

was unable to stop, and laughed so heartily that she burst. It would

have been all over with her, likewise, if, by good fortune, a tailor who

was travelling in search of work, had not sat down to rest by the brook.

As he had a compassionate heart he pulled out his needle and thread,

and sewed her together. The bean thanked him most prettily, but as the

tailor used black thread, all beans since then have a black seam.

Question 9 9. Which of the following is NOT a perceived theme in the story?

Question 10 10.

In the following sentence, which type of literary device is utilized?


The girl glided through the blue water like a swan swimming underneath the sunshine.

Question 11 11. As she worked on an essay in her English class, Melissa's teacher, Mrs. Wyland, suggested that Melissa make her sentences as detailed as possible. Which of the following demonstrates this?

Question 12 12. During a story's plot, this is known to be the part of the story when the reader learns background information and the setting, and is known as the:

Question 13 13. Which of the following is NOT an example of expository writing?

Question 14 14. A story involving animals that teaches a lesson is known as a:

Question 15 15. Which of the following Bell Ringers asks students to answer three or four questions from the previous day's lesson?

Tell us about yourself

Are you a student or a teacher?

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NES Middle Grades English Language Arts (201): Practice & Study Guide Final Free Practice Test Instructions

Choose your answer to the question and click 'Continue' to see how you did. Then click 'Next Question' to answer the next question. When you have completed the free practice test, click 'View Results' to see your results. Good luck!

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