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SHSAT: Practice & Study Guide Final Exam

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Question 1 1. For what value of x is 3x + 4 = 6x - 2?

Question 2 2.

In the following sentence, which revision to the bolded phrase could be made to make the language more precise?


''When Jeffrey and Leah went to the zoo, their first stop was in the exhibit where the lizards and snakes were kept.''

Question 3 3.

In a survey asking students whether they have brothers and/or sisters, the results determined all of the following statements to be true for the group:


  • 24 students had a brother(s)
  • 27 students had a sister(s)
  • 10 students had both a brother(s) and a sister(s)
  • 6 students had no siblings


How many students were surveyed for this study?

Question 4 4. Based on the Pythagorean theorem, which of the following triangles, with their legs a and b and hypotenuse (c) listed, is a right triangle?

Question 5 5. The set of possible values of b is {5, 11, 17}. What is the set of possible values of a if 3a = b - 2?

Question 6 6. In a bag of marbles, 6 are blue. The probability of picking out a blue marble from the bag is 3/5. How many marbles are in the bag?

Question 7 7. In this figure, ABCD forms a rectangle, whose area is 33 square inches and has sides AC and BD each equal to 3 inches. Line AB is the diameter of the circle that circumscribes the rectangle. What is the circumference of the circle, to the nearest tenth?

Question 8 8.

Drew is looking for an apartment to rent and is trying to find the least expensive option. The following are the four options Drew is looking at for a twelve-month lease. Which apartment is the least expensive option?


Cedarwood Park: $300 deposit, $500 rent per month

Oak Hills Apartments: $1,000 deposit, $400 rent per month

Ridge Way Facility: $0 deposit, $600 rent per month

Riverview Complex: $500 deposit, $450 per month

Use this material to answer questions #9 through #11

(1) We are naturally not in the habit of explaining the forgetting of intentions which we daily experience in every possible situation as being due to a recent change in the adjustment of motives. (2) We generally leave it unexplained, or we seek a psychologic explanation in the assumption that at the time of execution the required attention for the action, which was an indispensable condition for the occurrence of the intention, and was then at the disposal of the same action, no longer exists. (3) Observation of our normal behavior towards intentions urges us to reject this tentative explanation as arbitrary. (4) If I resolve in the morning to carry out a certain intention in the evening, I may be reminded of it several times in the course of the day, but it is not at all necessary that it should become conscious throughout the day. (5) As the time for its execution approaches it suddenly occurs to me and induces me to make the necessary preparation for the intended action. (6) If I go walking and take a letter with me to be posted, it is not at all necessary that I, as a normal not nervous individual, should carry it in my hand and continually look for a letterbox. (7) As a matter of fact I am accustomed to put it in my pocket and give my thoughts free rein on my way, feeling confident that the first letterbox will attract my attention and cause me to put my hand in my pocket and draw out the letter.


Sigmund Freud, ''Forgetting of Impressions and Resolutions,'' 1901

Question 9 9. The author discusses people's ''intentions'' throughout the passage. Which of the following BEST describes the meaning of ''intentions'' here?

Use this material to answer questions #9 through #11

(1) We are naturally not in the habit of explaining the forgetting of intentions which we daily experience in every possible situation as being due to a recent change in the adjustment of motives. (2) We generally leave it unexplained, or we seek a psychologic explanation in the assumption that at the time of execution the required attention for the action, which was an indispensable condition for the occurrence of the intention, and was then at the disposal of the same action, no longer exists. (3) Observation of our normal behavior towards intentions urges us to reject this tentative explanation as arbitrary. (4) If I resolve in the morning to carry out a certain intention in the evening, I may be reminded of it several times in the course of the day, but it is not at all necessary that it should become conscious throughout the day. (5) As the time for its execution approaches it suddenly occurs to me and induces me to make the necessary preparation for the intended action. (6) If I go walking and take a letter with me to be posted, it is not at all necessary that I, as a normal not nervous individual, should carry it in my hand and continually look for a letterbox. (7) As a matter of fact I am accustomed to put it in my pocket and give my thoughts free rein on my way, feeling confident that the first letterbox will attract my attention and cause me to put my hand in my pocket and draw out the letter.


Sigmund Freud, ''Forgetting of Impressions and Resolutions,'' 1901

Question 10 10. Based on sentence 6, which of the following points would the author of this passage logically believe?

Use this material to answer questions #9 through #11

(1) We are naturally not in the habit of explaining the forgetting of intentions which we daily experience in every possible situation as being due to a recent change in the adjustment of motives. (2) We generally leave it unexplained, or we seek a psychologic explanation in the assumption that at the time of execution the required attention for the action, which was an indispensable condition for the occurrence of the intention, and was then at the disposal of the same action, no longer exists. (3) Observation of our normal behavior towards intentions urges us to reject this tentative explanation as arbitrary. (4) If I resolve in the morning to carry out a certain intention in the evening, I may be reminded of it several times in the course of the day, but it is not at all necessary that it should become conscious throughout the day. (5) As the time for its execution approaches it suddenly occurs to me and induces me to make the necessary preparation for the intended action. (6) If I go walking and take a letter with me to be posted, it is not at all necessary that I, as a normal not nervous individual, should carry it in my hand and continually look for a letterbox. (7) As a matter of fact I am accustomed to put it in my pocket and give my thoughts free rein on my way, feeling confident that the first letterbox will attract my attention and cause me to put my hand in my pocket and draw out the letter.


Sigmund Freud, ''Forgetting of Impressions and Resolutions,'' 1901

Question 11 11. Which sentence from this passage suggests that people's intentions can be subconscious rather than explicit?

Question 12 12.

In the following sentence, which of the following revisions needs to be made to make this sentence grammatically correct?


''Abraham Lincoln was the sixteenth president of the United States, his Emancipation Proclamation played an important role in ending established slavery in the country.''

Use this material to answer questions #13 through #15

(1) There is no mark of our confidence taken more kindly by a friend, than the intrusting him with a secret; nor any which he is so likely to abuse. (2) Confidants, in general, are like crazy fire-locks, which are no sooner charged and cocked, than the spring gives way, and the report immediately follows. (3) Happy to have been thought worthy the confidence of one friend, they are impatient to manifest their importance to another; till between them and their friend, and their friend's friend, the whole matter is presently known to all our friends round the Wrekin. (4) The secret catches as it were by contact, and, like electrical matter, breaks forth from every link in the chain, almost at the same instant. (5) Thus, the whole Exchange may be thrown into a buzz tomorrow, by what was whispered in the middle or Marlborough Downs this morning; and in a week's time the streets may ring with the intrigue of a woman of fashion, bellowed out from the foul mouths of the hawkers, though at present it is known to no creature living, but her gallant and her waiting-maid. (6) As the talent of secrecy is of so great importance to society, and the necessary commerce between individuals cannot be securely carried on without it, that this deplorable weakness should be so general is much to be lamented. (7) You may as well pour water into a funnel or a sieve, and expect it to be retained there, as commit any of your concerns to so slippery a companion.


William Cowper, ''On Keeping Secrets,'' 1756

Question 13 13. Based on the context of the passage, what type of objects does ''crazy fire-locks'' refer to in sentence 2?

Use this material to answer questions #13 through #15

(1) There is no mark of our confidence taken more kindly by a friend, than the intrusting him with a secret; nor any which he is so likely to abuse. (2) Confidants, in general, are like crazy fire-locks, which are no sooner charged and cocked, than the spring gives way, and the report immediately follows. (3) Happy to have been thought worthy the confidence of one friend, they are impatient to manifest their importance to another; till between them and their friend, and their friend's friend, the whole matter is presently known to all our friends round the Wrekin. (4) The secret catches as it were by contact, and, like electrical matter, breaks forth from every link in the chain, almost at the same instant. (5) Thus, the whole Exchange may be thrown into a buzz tomorrow, by what was whispered in the middle or Marlborough Downs this morning; and in a week's time the streets may ring with the intrigue of a woman of fashion, bellowed out from the foul mouths of the hawkers, though at present it is known to no creature living, but her gallant and her waiting-maid. (6) As the talent of secrecy is of so great importance to society, and the necessary commerce between individuals cannot be securely carried on without it, that this deplorable weakness should be so general is much to be lamented. (7) You may as well pour water into a funnel or a sieve, and expect it to be retained there, as commit any of your concerns to so slippery a companion.


William Cowper, ''On Keeping Secrets,'' 1756

Question 14 14. Which of the following statements BEST describes the central idea of this passage?

Use this material to answer questions #13 through #15

(1) There is no mark of our confidence taken more kindly by a friend, than the intrusting him with a secret; nor any which he is so likely to abuse. (2) Confidants, in general, are like crazy fire-locks, which are no sooner charged and cocked, than the spring gives way, and the report immediately follows. (3) Happy to have been thought worthy the confidence of one friend, they are impatient to manifest their importance to another; till between them and their friend, and their friend's friend, the whole matter is presently known to all our friends round the Wrekin. (4) The secret catches as it were by contact, and, like electrical matter, breaks forth from every link in the chain, almost at the same instant. (5) Thus, the whole Exchange may be thrown into a buzz tomorrow, by what was whispered in the middle or Marlborough Downs this morning; and in a week's time the streets may ring with the intrigue of a woman of fashion, bellowed out from the foul mouths of the hawkers, though at present it is known to no creature living, but her gallant and her waiting-maid. (6) As the talent of secrecy is of so great importance to society, and the necessary commerce between individuals cannot be securely carried on without it, that this deplorable weakness should be so general is much to be lamented. (7) You may as well pour water into a funnel or a sieve, and expect it to be retained there, as commit any of your concerns to so slippery a companion.


William Cowper, ''On Keeping Secrets,'' 1756

Question 15 15. Which sentence from this passage BEST shows that the author thinks people not being able to keep secrets is a problem?

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SHSAT: Practice & Study Guide Final Free Practice Test Instructions

Choose your answer to the question and click 'Continue' to see how you did. Then click 'Next Question' to answer the next question. When you have completed the free practice test, click 'View Results' to see your results. Good luck!

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