TASC Reading: Prep and Practice Final Exam

Free Practice Test Instructions:

Choose your answer to the question and click 'Continue' to see how you did. Then click 'Next Question' to answer the next question. When you have completed the free practice test, click 'View Results' to see your results. Good luck!

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #4

I opened my eyes and looked around, trying to make out where I was. It

was after sun-up, and I had been sound asleep. Pap was standing over me

looking sour and sick, too. He says:

''What you doin' with this gun?''

I judged he didn't know nothing about what he had been doing, so I says:

''Somebody tried to get in, so I was laying for him.''

''Why didn't you roust me out?''

''Well, I tried to, but I couldn't; I couldn't budge you.''

''Well, all right. Don't stand there palavering all day, but out with

you and see if there's a fish on the lines for breakfast. I'll be along

in a minute.''

He unlocked the door, and I cleared out up the river-bank. I noticed

some pieces of limbs and such things floating down, and a sprinkling of

bark; so I knowed the river had begun to rise. I reckoned I would have

great times now if I was over at the town. The June rise used to be

always luck for me; because as soon as that rise begins here comes

cordwood floating down, and pieces of log rafts--sometimes a dozen logs

together; so all you have to do is to catch them and sell them to the

wood-yards and the sawmill.

I went along up the bank with one eye out for pap and t'other one out

for what the rise might fetch along. Well, all at once here comes a

canoe; just a beauty, too, about thirteen or fourteen foot long, riding

high like a duck. I shot head-first off of the bank like a frog,

clothes and all on, and struck out for the canoe. I just expected

there'd be somebody laying down in it, because people often done that

to fool folks, and when a chap had pulled a skiff out most to it they'd

raise up and laugh at him. But it warn't so this time. It was a

drift-canoe sure enough, and I clumb in and paddled her ashore. Thinks

I, the old man will be glad when he sees this--she's worth ten dollars.

But when I got to shore pap wasn't in sight yet, and as I was running

her into a little creek like a gully, all hung over with vines and

willows, I struck another idea: I judged I'd hide her good, and then,

'stead of taking to the woods when I run off, I'd go down the river

about fifty mile and camp in one place for good, and not have such a

rough time tramping on foot.

It was pretty close to the shanty, and I thought I heard the old man

coming all the time; but I got her hid; and then I out and looked around

a bunch of willows, and there was the old man down the path a piece just

drawing a bead on a bird with his gun. So he hadn't seen anything.

When he got along I was hard at it taking up a ''trot'' line. He abused

me a little for being so slow; but I told him I fell in the river, and

that was what made me so long. I knowed he would see I was wet, and

then he would be asking questions. We got five catfish off the lines

and went home.

Question 1 1. In the passage, what literary device does the author utilize as he compares the canoe to a duck?

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #4

I opened my eyes and looked around, trying to make out where I was. It

was after sun-up, and I had been sound asleep. Pap was standing over me

looking sour and sick, too. He says:

''What you doin' with this gun?''

I judged he didn't know nothing about what he had been doing, so I says:

''Somebody tried to get in, so I was laying for him.''

''Why didn't you roust me out?''

''Well, I tried to, but I couldn't; I couldn't budge you.''

''Well, all right. Don't stand there palavering all day, but out with

you and see if there's a fish on the lines for breakfast. I'll be along

in a minute.''

He unlocked the door, and I cleared out up the river-bank. I noticed

some pieces of limbs and such things floating down, and a sprinkling of

bark; so I knowed the river had begun to rise. I reckoned I would have

great times now if I was over at the town. The June rise used to be

always luck for me; because as soon as that rise begins here comes

cordwood floating down, and pieces of log rafts--sometimes a dozen logs

together; so all you have to do is to catch them and sell them to the

wood-yards and the sawmill.

I went along up the bank with one eye out for pap and t'other one out

for what the rise might fetch along. Well, all at once here comes a

canoe; just a beauty, too, about thirteen or fourteen foot long, riding

high like a duck. I shot head-first off of the bank like a frog,

clothes and all on, and struck out for the canoe. I just expected

there'd be somebody laying down in it, because people often done that

to fool folks, and when a chap had pulled a skiff out most to it they'd

raise up and laugh at him. But it warn't so this time. It was a

drift-canoe sure enough, and I clumb in and paddled her ashore. Thinks

I, the old man will be glad when he sees this--she's worth ten dollars.

But when I got to shore pap wasn't in sight yet, and as I was running

her into a little creek like a gully, all hung over with vines and

willows, I struck another idea: I judged I'd hide her good, and then,

'stead of taking to the woods when I run off, I'd go down the river

about fifty mile and camp in one place for good, and not have such a

rough time tramping on foot.

It was pretty close to the shanty, and I thought I heard the old man

coming all the time; but I got her hid; and then I out and looked around

a bunch of willows, and there was the old man down the path a piece just

drawing a bead on a bird with his gun. So he hadn't seen anything.

When he got along I was hard at it taking up a ''trot'' line. He abused

me a little for being so slow; but I told him I fell in the river, and

that was what made me so long. I knowed he would see I was wet, and

then he would be asking questions. We got five catfish off the lines

and went home.

Question 2 2. What is a description of the meaning of the word 'roust', as used in the passage?

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #4

I opened my eyes and looked around, trying to make out where I was. It

was after sun-up, and I had been sound asleep. Pap was standing over me

looking sour and sick, too. He says:

''What you doin' with this gun?''

I judged he didn't know nothing about what he had been doing, so I says:

''Somebody tried to get in, so I was laying for him.''

''Why didn't you roust me out?''

''Well, I tried to, but I couldn't; I couldn't budge you.''

''Well, all right. Don't stand there palavering all day, but out with

you and see if there's a fish on the lines for breakfast. I'll be along

in a minute.''

He unlocked the door, and I cleared out up the river-bank. I noticed

some pieces of limbs and such things floating down, and a sprinkling of

bark; so I knowed the river had begun to rise. I reckoned I would have

great times now if I was over at the town. The June rise used to be

always luck for me; because as soon as that rise begins here comes

cordwood floating down, and pieces of log rafts--sometimes a dozen logs

together; so all you have to do is to catch them and sell them to the

wood-yards and the sawmill.

I went along up the bank with one eye out for pap and t'other one out

for what the rise might fetch along. Well, all at once here comes a

canoe; just a beauty, too, about thirteen or fourteen foot long, riding

high like a duck. I shot head-first off of the bank like a frog,

clothes and all on, and struck out for the canoe. I just expected

there'd be somebody laying down in it, because people often done that

to fool folks, and when a chap had pulled a skiff out most to it they'd

raise up and laugh at him. But it warn't so this time. It was a

drift-canoe sure enough, and I clumb in and paddled her ashore. Thinks

I, the old man will be glad when he sees this--she's worth ten dollars.

But when I got to shore pap wasn't in sight yet, and as I was running

her into a little creek like a gully, all hung over with vines and

willows, I struck another idea: I judged I'd hide her good, and then,

'stead of taking to the woods when I run off, I'd go down the river

about fifty mile and camp in one place for good, and not have such a

rough time tramping on foot.

It was pretty close to the shanty, and I thought I heard the old man

coming all the time; but I got her hid; and then I out and looked around

a bunch of willows, and there was the old man down the path a piece just

drawing a bead on a bird with his gun. So he hadn't seen anything.

When he got along I was hard at it taking up a ''trot'' line. He abused

me a little for being so slow; but I told him I fell in the river, and

that was what made me so long. I knowed he would see I was wet, and

then he would be asking questions. We got five catfish off the lines

and went home.

Question 3 3. Why was the 'June rise' helpful?

Use this material to answer questions #1 through #4

I opened my eyes and looked around, trying to make out where I was. It

was after sun-up, and I had been sound asleep. Pap was standing over me

looking sour and sick, too. He says:

''What you doin' with this gun?''

I judged he didn't know nothing about what he had been doing, so I says:

''Somebody tried to get in, so I was laying for him.''

''Why didn't you roust me out?''

''Well, I tried to, but I couldn't; I couldn't budge you.''

''Well, all right. Don't stand there palavering all day, but out with

you and see if there's a fish on the lines for breakfast. I'll be along

in a minute.''

He unlocked the door, and I cleared out up the river-bank. I noticed

some pieces of limbs and such things floating down, and a sprinkling of

bark; so I knowed the river had begun to rise. I reckoned I would have

great times now if I was over at the town. The June rise used to be

always luck for me; because as soon as that rise begins here comes

cordwood floating down, and pieces of log rafts--sometimes a dozen logs

together; so all you have to do is to catch them and sell them to the

wood-yards and the sawmill.

I went along up the bank with one eye out for pap and t'other one out

for what the rise might fetch along. Well, all at once here comes a

canoe; just a beauty, too, about thirteen or fourteen foot long, riding

high like a duck. I shot head-first off of the bank like a frog,

clothes and all on, and struck out for the canoe. I just expected

there'd be somebody laying down in it, because people often done that

to fool folks, and when a chap had pulled a skiff out most to it they'd

raise up and laugh at him. But it warn't so this time. It was a

drift-canoe sure enough, and I clumb in and paddled her ashore. Thinks

I, the old man will be glad when he sees this--she's worth ten dollars.

But when I got to shore pap wasn't in sight yet, and as I was running

her into a little creek like a gully, all hung over with vines and

willows, I struck another idea: I judged I'd hide her good, and then,

'stead of taking to the woods when I run off, I'd go down the river

about fifty mile and camp in one place for good, and not have such a

rough time tramping on foot.

It was pretty close to the shanty, and I thought I heard the old man

coming all the time; but I got her hid; and then I out and looked around

a bunch of willows, and there was the old man down the path a piece just

drawing a bead on a bird with his gun. So he hadn't seen anything.

When he got along I was hard at it taking up a ''trot'' line. He abused

me a little for being so slow; but I told him I fell in the river, and

that was what made me so long. I knowed he would see I was wet, and

then he would be asking questions. We got five catfish off the lines

and went home.

Question 4 4. What does the main character plan on hiding from pap?

Question 5 5. When an author gives animals the ability to take on human characteristics, such as speaking, this is known as:

Question 6 6. Of the following, which is an overused description that has lost its full impact within a literary piece?

Question 7 7. Which of the following types of humorous writing occurs when the language of a famous piece of literature is made fun of?

Question 8 8. A situation that has been created by the author and is only known to the reader is:

Question 9 9. Of the following types of logical appeal, which one describes the idea that one event will automatically lead to another certain event?

Question 10 10. Which of the following is an idea associated with specific words in a text?

Use this material to answer questions #11 through #12

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate -- we can not consecrate -- we can not hallow -- this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain -- that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom -- and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Abraham Lincoln

November 19, 1863

Question 11 11. In his last sentence in the Gettysburg Address, Lincoln refers to:

Use this material to answer questions #11 through #12

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate -- we can not consecrate -- we can not hallow -- this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain -- that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom -- and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Abraham Lincoln

November 19, 1863

Question 12 12. What does Lincoln dedicate within his speech?

Use this material to answer questions #13 through #15

''Have you seen my boy?'' said Mr. Bushby as we came up, ''he went out an

hour ago on my black pony, and the creature is just come back without a

rider.''

''I should think, sir,'' said John, ''he had better be without a rider,

unless he can be ridden properly.''

''What do you mean?'' said the farmer.

''Well, sir, I saw your son whipping, and kicking, and knocking that good

little pony about shamefully because he would not leap a gate that was

too high for him. The pony behaved well, sir, and showed no vice; but at

last he just threw up his heels and tipped the young gentleman into the

thorn hedge. He wanted me to help him out, but I hope you will excuse

me, sir, I did not feel inclined to do so. There's no bones broken, sir;

he'll only get a few scratches. I love horses, and it riles me to see

them badly used; it is a bad plan to aggravate an animal till he uses

his heels; the first time is not always the last.''

During this time the mother began to cry, ''Oh, my poor Bill, I must go

and meet him; he must be hurt.''

''You had better go into the house, wife,'' said the farmer; ''Bill wants a

lesson about this, and I must see that he gets it; this is not the first

time, nor the second, that he has ill-used that pony, and I shall stop

it. I am much obliged to you, Manly. Good-evening.''

So we went on, John chuckling all the way home; then he told James about

it, who laughed and said, ?Serve him right. I knew that boy at school;

he took great airs on himself because he was a farmer's son; he used to

swagger about and bully the little boys. Of course, we elder ones would

not have any of that nonsense, and let him know that in the school and

the playground farmers' sons and laborers' sons were all alike. I well

remember one day, just before afternoon school, I found him at the large

window catching flies and pulling off their wings. He did not see me and

I gave him a box on the ears that laid him sprawling on the floor. Well,

angry as I was, I was almost frightened, he roared and bellowed in such

a style. The boys rushed in from the playground, and the master ran in

from the road to see who was being murdered. Of course I said fair and

square at once what I had done, and why; then I showed the master the

flies, some crushed and some crawling about helpless, and I showed him

the wings on the window sill. I never saw him so angry before; but as

Bill was still howling and whining, like the coward that he was, he did

not give him any more punishment of that kind, but set him up on a stool

for the rest of the afternoon, and said that he should not go out to

play for that week. Then he talked to all the boys very seriously about

cruelty, and said how hard-hearted and cowardly it was to hurt the

weak and the helpless; but what stuck in my mind was this, he said that

cruelty was the devil's own trade-mark, and if we saw any one who took

pleasure in cruelty we might know who he belonged to, for the devil was

a murderer from the beginning, and a tormentor to the end. On the other

hand, where we saw people who loved their neighbors, and were kind to

man and beast, we might know that was God's mark.''

''Your master never taught you a truer thing,'' said John; ''there is no

religion without love, and people may talk as much as they like about

their religion, but if it does not teach them to be good and kind to man

and beast it is all a sham--all a sham, James, and it won't stand when

things come to be turned inside out.''

Question 13 13. In the passage, what does the phrase show 'no vice' mean?

Use this material to answer questions #13 through #15

''Have you seen my boy?'' said Mr. Bushby as we came up, ''he went out an

hour ago on my black pony, and the creature is just come back without a

rider.''

''I should think, sir,'' said John, ''he had better be without a rider,

unless he can be ridden properly.''

''What do you mean?'' said the farmer.

''Well, sir, I saw your son whipping, and kicking, and knocking that good

little pony about shamefully because he would not leap a gate that was

too high for him. The pony behaved well, sir, and showed no vice; but at

last he just threw up his heels and tipped the young gentleman into the

thorn hedge. He wanted me to help him out, but I hope you will excuse

me, sir, I did not feel inclined to do so. There's no bones broken, sir;

he'll only get a few scratches. I love horses, and it riles me to see

them badly used; it is a bad plan to aggravate an animal till he uses

his heels; the first time is not always the last.''

During this time the mother began to cry, ''Oh, my poor Bill, I must go

and meet him; he must be hurt.''

''You had better go into the house, wife,'' said the farmer; ''Bill wants a

lesson about this, and I must see that he gets it; this is not the first

time, nor the second, that he has ill-used that pony, and I shall stop

it. I am much obliged to you, Manly. Good-evening.''

So we went on, John chuckling all the way home; then he told James about

it, who laughed and said, ?Serve him right. I knew that boy at school;

he took great airs on himself because he was a farmer's son; he used to

swagger about and bully the little boys. Of course, we elder ones would

not have any of that nonsense, and let him know that in the school and

the playground farmers' sons and laborers' sons were all alike. I well

remember one day, just before afternoon school, I found him at the large

window catching flies and pulling off their wings. He did not see me and

I gave him a box on the ears that laid him sprawling on the floor. Well,

angry as I was, I was almost frightened, he roared and bellowed in such

a style. The boys rushed in from the playground, and the master ran in

from the road to see who was being murdered. Of course I said fair and

square at once what I had done, and why; then I showed the master the

flies, some crushed and some crawling about helpless, and I showed him

the wings on the window sill. I never saw him so angry before; but as

Bill was still howling and whining, like the coward that he was, he did

not give him any more punishment of that kind, but set him up on a stool

for the rest of the afternoon, and said that he should not go out to

play for that week. Then he talked to all the boys very seriously about

cruelty, and said how hard-hearted and cowardly it was to hurt the

weak and the helpless; but what stuck in my mind was this, he said that

cruelty was the devil's own trade-mark, and if we saw any one who took

pleasure in cruelty we might know who he belonged to, for the devil was

a murderer from the beginning, and a tormentor to the end. On the other

hand, where we saw people who loved their neighbors, and were kind to

man and beast, we might know that was God's mark.''

''Your master never taught you a truer thing,'' said John; ''there is no

religion without love, and people may talk as much as they like about

their religion, but if it does not teach them to be good and kind to man

and beast it is all a sham--all a sham, James, and it won't stand when

things come to be turned inside out.''

Question 14 14. In the passage, 'all a sham' describes:

Use this material to answer questions #13 through #15

''Have you seen my boy?'' said Mr. Bushby as we came up, ''he went out an

hour ago on my black pony, and the creature is just come back without a

rider.''

''I should think, sir,'' said John, ''he had better be without a rider,

unless he can be ridden properly.''

''What do you mean?'' said the farmer.

''Well, sir, I saw your son whipping, and kicking, and knocking that good

little pony about shamefully because he would not leap a gate that was

too high for him. The pony behaved well, sir, and showed no vice; but at

last he just threw up his heels and tipped the young gentleman into the

thorn hedge. He wanted me to help him out, but I hope you will excuse

me, sir, I did not feel inclined to do so. There's no bones broken, sir;

he'll only get a few scratches. I love horses, and it riles me to see

them badly used; it is a bad plan to aggravate an animal till he uses

his heels; the first time is not always the last.''

During this time the mother began to cry, ''Oh, my poor Bill, I must go

and meet him; he must be hurt.''

''You had better go into the house, wife,'' said the farmer; ''Bill wants a

lesson about this, and I must see that he gets it; this is not the first

time, nor the second, that he has ill-used that pony, and I shall stop

it. I am much obliged to you, Manly. Good-evening.''

So we went on, John chuckling all the way home; then he told James about

it, who laughed and said, ?Serve him right. I knew that boy at school;

he took great airs on himself because he was a farmer's son; he used to

swagger about and bully the little boys. Of course, we elder ones would

not have any of that nonsense, and let him know that in the school and

the playground farmers' sons and laborers' sons were all alike. I well

remember one day, just before afternoon school, I found him at the large

window catching flies and pulling off their wings. He did not see me and

I gave him a box on the ears that laid him sprawling on the floor. Well,

angry as I was, I was almost frightened, he roared and bellowed in such

a style. The boys rushed in from the playground, and the master ran in

from the road to see who was being murdered. Of course I said fair and

square at once what I had done, and why; then I showed the master the

flies, some crushed and some crawling about helpless, and I showed him

the wings on the window sill. I never saw him so angry before; but as

Bill was still howling and whining, like the coward that he was, he did

not give him any more punishment of that kind, but set him up on a stool

for the rest of the afternoon, and said that he should not go out to

play for that week. Then he talked to all the boys very seriously about

cruelty, and said how hard-hearted and cowardly it was to hurt the

weak and the helpless; but what stuck in my mind was this, he said that

cruelty was the devil's own trade-mark, and if we saw any one who took

pleasure in cruelty we might know who he belonged to, for the devil was

a murderer from the beginning, and a tormentor to the end. On the other

hand, where we saw people who loved their neighbors, and were kind to

man and beast, we might know that was God's mark.''

''Your master never taught you a truer thing,'' said John; ''there is no

religion without love, and people may talk as much as they like about

their religion, but if it does not teach them to be good and kind to man

and beast it is all a sham--all a sham, James, and it won't stand when

things come to be turned inside out.''

Question 15 15. In the passage, why does the farmer send his wife into the house?

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