ACT Reading - Practice: Help and Review Chapter Exam

Exam Instructions:

Choose your answers to the questions and click 'Next' to see the next set of questions. You can skip questions if you would like and come back to them later with the yellow "Go To First Skipped Question" button. When you have completed the practice exam, a green submit button will appear. Click it to see your results. Good luck!

Page 1

Question 1 1.

Recent biological research has shown that the idiosyncracies of the platypus even extend down to the genetic level. Platypuses are mammals, but where most mammals have two sex chromosomes (XX for women and XY for men), platypuses have 10, an arrangement more typical of birds.

According to the passage, having 10 sex chromosomes is…

Question 2 2.

…Nor are the platypus' reproductive oddities the only characteristics that leave researchers scratching their heads. A platypus has a bill like a duck, a tail like a beaver, and venomous claws on its webbed feet. As well as using their senses of sight and smell, platypuses can navigate through water and locate prey by detecting electric fields. This is a species full of anomalies - so much so that it was originally considered an obvious hoax.

The author would describe the platypus' bill, tail, claws, and navigational abilities as…

Question 3 3.

Sophie had barely seen London as a child. Whisked along through the streets, clinging to her mother's hand, she'd formed the impression that the whole great metropolis was largely populated by knees and boots in varying states of dampness. The only place she remembered clearly was their house, where she spent hours in her room, pressed up against the drafty window as the late-autumn chill seeped through the glass. Despite the cold, she could never tear herself away from that window, because on the street below, the tiny butcher's shop hummed with activity. Watching from her window she could finally see what life was actually like in this strange new city where she'd suddenly been set down.

The passage implies that...

Question 4 4.

Of all the evolutionary odds and ends that populate Australia, platypuses are among the most vexing. Platypuses are mammals; and as a rule, mammals give birth to live young, but the platypus lays eggs. Only one other mammalian species - the echidna, another Australian native - can boast the same distinction. To make things even more confusing, platypuses then go on to nurse their babies (a trait typical of mammals but unusual in egg-laying species). Female platypuses accomplish this not through nipples, but rather through small openings directly on the skin of their bellies.

In this passage, the author describes…

Question 5 5.

How can we define poetry? Ask a 6th grader, and you're likely to get an answer about rhymes and stanzas. But poetry doesn't have to rhyme, and indeed, some of the most beautiful poetry doesn't. Some of it isn't even arranged in lines. To truly appreciate the value of poetry as an art form, you need to look beyond the sonnet form, beyond definitions of alliteration or chiasmus. Appreciate the rhythmic, syllabic, shifting, surging, pulsing beauty of words in all their forms: then, you'll start to understand poetry.

Does the author consider poetry written in 'the sonnet form' to be true poetry?

Page 2

Question 6 6.

With our social, political, and economic life increasingly taking place online, legislators and activists have recently started to push for internet access to be declared a human right. In today's world, they argue, freedom of expression is meaningless without the power to communicate online.

The passage implies that the 'legislators and activists'…

Question 7 7.

Turning onto the campus proper, Dr. Gerhartt mentally organized his day into 20-minute blocks. Answering email was relegated to the minutes between 9:20 and 9:40, and then again between 1:40 and 2:00, with no leeway for distraction at any other time. His secretary's memos required an entire block of their own (9:00-9:20), but at least after that, they would be done with. Aside from a 40-minute break for lunch, and a 1-hour departmental meeting in the afternoon, he could preserve the entire remaining workday for his precious experimental work. With a brief glance at his watch, he swept briskly through the door to his office, and glanced around in satisfaction: all his machinery lined the walls, meticulously clean and exactly as he had left it. His day's work could begin.

Based on this passage, it would be reasonable to conclude that Dr. Gerhartt values…

Question 8 8.

Critics of Lacy's work argue that her stories would be more appropriate for novels, or perhaps mixed-media, that the physical stage is too limited a medium for such extreme and fantastic settings. I find, however, that the immediacy of the stage adds more to her work than its physical limitations subtract. In fact, the imperfect stage effects even help me connect to the characters - a connection that might otherwise be hard to forge between the audience and Lacy's trademark alien protagonists.

What might be an example of the 'physical limitations' that the author mentions?

Question 9 9. Imagine that you're a world-famous expert on voting rights. You've been studying voting rights for the past 20 years, you've helped establish functional democracies in four different post-Soviet states, and the library at your old university was renamed in your honor. Because so many years of study have driven you slightly mad, you decide to take the ACT. You happen to get a passage about voting rights. Are you guaranteed to do well?

Question 10 10.

Sophie had barely seen London as a child. Whisked along through the streets, clinging to her mother's hand, she'd formed the impression that the whole great metropolis was largely populated by knees and boots in varying states of dampness. The only place she remembered clearly was their house, where she spent hours in her room, pressed up against the drafty window as the late-autumn chill seeped through the glass. Despite the cold, she could never tear herself away from that window, because on the street below, the tiny butcher's shop hummed with activity. Watching from her window she could finally see what life was actually like in this strange new city where she'd suddenly been set down.

Sophie's awareness of 'knees and boots' emphasizes her…

Page 3

Question 11 11.

In coevolution, two or more species drive each other's evolutionary adaptations. Sometimes, this is beneficial to both: symbiotic coevolution is the simultaneous evolution of two different species as a team, to maximize the survival advantages of both. To name just one of many examples, some species of flowers have evolved to meet the needs of hummingbirds: their color is easy for birds to see, and their shape is perfectly suited to the birds' bills. When the hummingbirds feed from these attractive and convenient flowers, they pollinate the plants, so the increase in hummingbird traffic is a benefit to the flowers as well as the birds. Some forms of coevolution are also antagonistic: predators and prey often co-evolve in a kind of biological arms race.

An example of a 'biological arms race,' as the term is used in this passage, could be…

Question 12 12.

How can we define poetry? Ask a 6th grader, and you're likely to get an answer about rhymes and stanzas. But poetry doesn't have to rhyme, and indeed, some of the most beautiful poetry doesn't. Some of it isn't even arranged in lines. To truly appreciate the value of poetry as an art form, you need to look beyond the sonnet form, beyond definitions of alliteration or chiasmus. Appreciate the rhythmic, syllabic, shifting, surging, pulsing beauty of words in all their forms: then, you'll start to understand poetry.

Which of the following best captures what the author believes to be the defining feature of poetry?

Question 13 13.

Critics of Lacy's work argue that her stories would be more appropriate for novels, or perhaps mixed-media, that the physical stage is too limited a medium for such extreme and fantastic settings. I find, however, that the immediacy of the stage adds more to her work than its physical limitations subtract. In fact, the imperfect stage effects even help me connect to the characters - a connection that might otherwise be hard to forge between the audience and Lacy's trademark alien protagonists.

The 'critics' primarily object to…

Question 14 14.

Turning onto the campus proper, Dr. Gerhartt mentally organized his day into 20-minute blocks. Answering email was relegated to the minutes between 9:20 and 9:40, and then again between 1:40 and 2:00, with no leeway for distraction at any other time. His secretary's memos required an entire block of their own (9:00-9:20), but at least after that, they would be done with. Aside from a 40-minute break for lunch, and a 1-hour departmental meeting in the afternoon, he could preserve the entire remaining workday for his precious experimental work.

According to the passage, Dr. Gerhartt views the task of handling his secretary's memos as…

Question 15 15.

In coevolution, two or more species drive each other's evolutionary adaptations. Sometimes, this is beneficial to both: symbiotic coevolution is the simultaneous evolution of two different species as a team, to maximize the survival advantages of both. To name just one of many examples, some species of flowers have evolved to meet the needs of hummingbirds: their color is easy for birds to see, and their shape is perfectly suited to the birds' bills. When the hummingbirds feed from these attractive and convenient flowers, they pollinate the plants, so the increase in hummingbird traffic is a benefit to the flowers as well as the birds.

The author implies that…

Page 4

Question 16 16.

With our social, political, and economic life increasingly taking place online, legislators and activists have recently started to push for internet access to be declared a human right. In today's world, they argue, freedom of expression is meaningless without the power to communicate online...Critics argue that 'freedom of expression' does not imply free access to any particular means of expression. Since use of telephones or paper mail is not considered a human right, claiming that status for the internet is illogical. Or they simply point out that for many people around the world, adequate food and clean water are much more pressing needs than online interaction, and that focusing on internet access could distract us from these more basic concerns.

In this passage, how do the 'critics' respond to the argument of the 'legislators and activists' about human rights?

Question 17 17.

How can we define poetry? Ask a 6th grader, and you're likely to get an answer about rhymes and stanzas. But poetry doesn't have to rhyme, and indeed, some of the most beautiful poetry doesn't. Some of it isn't even arranged in lines. To truly appreciate the value of poetry as an art form, you need to look beyond the sonnet form, beyond definitions of alliteration or chiasmus. Appreciate the rhythmic, syllabic, shifting, surging, pulsing beauty of words in all their forms: then, you'll start to understand poetry.

In the passage, the '6th grader' serves as an example of a person who…

Question 18 18.

Sophie had barely seen London as a child. Whisked along through the streets, clinging to her mother's hand, she'd formed the impression that the whole great metropolis was largely populated by knees and boots in varying states of dampness. The only place she remembered clearly was their house, where she spent hours in her room, pressed up against the drafty window as the late-autumn chill seeped through the glass. Despite the cold, she could never tear herself away from that window, because on the street below, the tiny butcher's shop hummed with activity. Watching from her window she could finally see what life was actually like in this strange new city where she'd suddenly been set down.

The fact that Sophie 'could never tear herself away from that window' demonstrates her…

Question 19 19.

With our social, political, and economic life increasingly taking place online, legislators and activists have recently started to push for internet access to be declared a human right. In today's world, they argue, freedom of expression is meaningless without the power to communicate online. In agreement with this position, several countries have actually written the right to internet access into their legal system, but others remain skeptical. Critics argue that since use of telephones or paper mail is not considered a human right, claiming that status for the internet is illogical.

The argument of the 'critics' is based primarily on…

Question 20 20. When working on an ACT Reading question, after reading the question, should you read the answer choices first, or go straight to the passage?

ACT Reading - Practice: Help and Review Chapter Exam Instructions

Choose your answers to the questions and click 'Next' to see the next set of questions. You can skip questions if you would like and come back to them later with the yellow "Go To First Skipped Question" button. When you have completed the practice exam, a green submit button will appear. Click it to see your results. Good luck!

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