ACT Science Reasoning - Overview: Help and Review Chapter Exam

Exam Instructions:

Choose your answers to the questions and click 'Next' to see the next set of questions. You can skip questions if you would like and come back to them later with the yellow "Go To First Skipped Question" button. When you have completed the practice exam, a green submit button will appear. Click it to see your results. Good luck!

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Question 1 1.

In a controversial decision in 2006, Pluto was re-classified from 'planet' to 'dwarf planet,' in part because it does not clear the area around its orbit. The passages below give you the opinion of two scientists on this decision.

Scientist 1

The classification of a 'planet' as distinguished from a 'dwarf planet' or a 'plutoid' is ultimately arbitrary. It does not spring from some self-evident law of the universe, but from the human desire to sort objects into types and classify them by consistent standards. Clearing the neighborhood around its orbit is a standard that humans created for defining our term 'planet' - but what's stopping us from changing that standard? Nothing: the definition is as arbitrary as the collection of syllables we use to refer to it. Linguistic nit-picking, not science, is the reason why Pluto is no longer a 'planet.'

Scientist 2

Scientific language cannot just mean whatever we want it to mean: without a clear and objective definition, terms like 'planet' would be useless. And when we find that an object has been misclassified, the only way to keep our language useful is to re-classify it appropriately, not to simply change words to cover up our own mistakes. This is what has happened with Pluto. It simply does not meet the definition of a 'planet,' and expanding the term 'planet' to cover it would make the word meaningless. However fond our memories of 7th grade Science class might be, the only true solution is to reclassify Pluto.

If you were going to nickname Scientist 2 in a way that helped you distinguish her from Scientist 1, which would be the best nickname?

Question 2 2.

A scientist is studying the average speed and fastest recorded speed of four creatures. His results, in miles per hour, are shown in the table below.

Which of the following conclusions could be made based on the information presented?

Question 3 3.

A scientist is studying the average speed and fastest recorded speed of four creatures. His results, in miles per hour, are shown in the table below.

For which creature is the difference between average speed and fastest speed the greatest?

Question 4 4. Which of the following is NOT a good strategy to use on the ACT Science test?

Question 5 5. Which of the following will you NOT see much on Conflicting Viewpoints passages?

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Question 6 6. Are the questions on the Conflicting Viewpoints passages arranged in order of difficulty?

Question 7 7.

A scientist is testing the actions of a new antibiotic. Bacterial species can be either gram-positive or gram-negative. Gram-positive bacteria turn purple when stained with crystal violet; gram-negative bacteria do not. Bacteria can also be anaerobic or aerobic. Anaerobic bacteria need an oxygen-free environment to live; aerobic bacteria need oxygen. Facultative anaerobes are bacteria that can survive in either environment.

A scientist tested the action of a new antibiotic drug, Drug A, by placing the drug in a petri dish smeared with bacteria and observing how large of an area the antibiotic can clear. The larger the radius of the cleared area, the more powerful the drug is against that particular strain of bacteria. The table below shows the effectiveness of the drug against several different bacterial strains.

Consider the following four antibiotics:

  • Daptomycin: used to kill gram-positive bacteria.
  • Aztreonam: used to kill gram-negative bacteria.
  • Metronidazole: used to kill anaerobes.
  • Rifaximin: used to kill Escherichia coli.

Drug A is most likely which of these antibiotics?

Question 8 8.

Velocity is a measurement of speed and direction. When the velocity of an object is reported, the direction is indicated by the sign: a positive number means that the object is moving forward, and a negative number means that the object is moving backwards. The speed is indicated by the magnitude of the number.

A student drives three different toy cars at different velocities. She dries each car at the same velocity for one minute, and then switches to a different velocity. She only drives the cars straight forward or backward; they never go from side to side. The details of her experiment are shown in the table. Speed is measured in feet per minute.

All the cars started from the same starting point. At the 1:59 minute mark, how much further ahead was Car 2, compared to Car 1?

Question 9 9.

The graph shows the rock layers on a 6-mile cross-section of a mountain range. Height is in thousands of feet.

At which of the following locations along the cliff face is the slate layer thickest?

Question 10 10. Which of the following will you NOT need to do a Research Summaries passage?

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Question 11 11. How long is the ACT Science Reasoning section?

Question 12 12. You open the ACT Science test to the first page. Even without skimming it, you can see that the very first passage contains a really hard graph. What should you do?

Question 13 13. ACT Science Reasoning questions are primarily about…

Question 14 14. The ACT Science Reasoning test primarily evaluates your ability to…

Question 15 15. Which of the following is the correct way to handle a question that you just can't crack?

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Question 16 16. How many experiments will you read about in a single Research Summaries passage?

Question 17 17.

A scientist is testing the actions of a new antibiotic. Bacterial species can be either gram-positive or gram-negative. Gram-positive bacteria turn purple when stained with crystal violet; gram-negative bacteria do not. Bacteria can also be anaerobic or aerobic. Anaerobic bacteria need an oxygen-free environment to live; aerobic bacteria need oxygen. Facultative anaerobes are bacteria that can survive in either environment.

A scientist tested the action of a new antibiotic drug, Drug A, by placing the drug in a petri dish smeared with bacteria and observing how large of an area the antibiotic can clear. The larger the radius of the cleared area, the more powerful the drug is against that particular strain of bacteria. The table below shows the effectiveness of the drug against several different bacterial strains.

In general, was this antibiotic more effective against gram-positive or gram-negative bacteria?

Question 18 18.

In a controversial decision in 2006, Pluto was re-classified from 'planet' to 'dwarf planet,' in part because it does not clear the area around its orbit. The passages below give you the opinion of two scientists on this decision.

Scientist 1

The classification of a 'planet' as distinguished from a 'dwarf planet' or a 'plutoid' is ultimately arbitrary. It does not spring from some self-evident law of the universe, but from the human desire to sort objects into types and classify them by consistent standards. Clearing the neighborhood around its orbit is a standard that humans created for defining our term 'planet' - but what's stopping us from changing that standard? Nothing: the definition is as arbitrary as the collection of syllables we use to refer to it. Linguistic nit-picking, not science, is the reason why Pluto is no longer a 'planet.'

Scientist 2

Scientific language cannot just mean whatever we want it to mean: without a clear and objective definition, terms like 'planet' would be useless. And when we find that an object has been misclassified, the only way to keep our language useful is to re-classify it appropriately, not to simply change words to cover up our own mistakes. This is what has happened with Pluto. It simply does not meet the definition of a 'planet,' and expanding the term 'planet' to cover it would make the word meaningless. However fond our memories of 7th grade Science class might be, the only true solution is to reclassify Pluto.

Scientist 2 would argue that what Scientist 1 describes as 'linguistic nit-picking' (Scientist 1) is …

Question 19 19.

Velocity is a measurement of speed and direction. When the velocity of an object is reported, the direction is indicated by the sign: a positive number means that the object is moving forward, and a negative number means that the object is moving backwards. The speed is indicated by the magnitude of the number.

A student drives three different toy cars at different velocities. She dries each car at the same velocity for one minute, and then switches to a different velocity. She only drives the cars straight forward or backward; they never go from side to side. The details of her experiment are shown in the table. Speed is measured in feet per minute.

At 1:45, Car 2 was travelling…

Question 20 20.

In a controversial decision in 2006, Pluto was re-classified from 'planet' to 'dwarf planet,' in part because it does not clear the area around its orbit. The passages below give you the opinion of two scientists on this decision.

Scientist 1

The classification of a 'planet' as distinguished from a 'dwarf planet' or a 'plutoid' is ultimately arbitrary. It does not spring from some self-evident law of the universe, but from the human desire to sort objects into types and classify them by consistent standards. Clearing the neighborhood around its orbit is a standard that humans created for defining our term 'planet' - but what's stopping us from changing that standard? Nothing: the definition is as arbitrary as the collection of syllables we use to refer to it. Linguistic nit-picking, not science, is the reason why Pluto is no longer a 'planet.'

Scientist 2

Scientific language cannot just mean whatever we want it to mean: without a clear and objective definition, terms like 'planet' would be useless. And when we find that an object has been misclassified, the only way to keep our language useful is to re-classify it appropriately, not to simply change words to cover up our own mistakes. This is what has happened with Pluto. It simply does not meet the definition of a 'planet,' and expanding the term 'planet' to cover it would make the word meaningless. However fond our memories of 7th grade Science class might be, the only true solution is to reclassify Pluto.

Which of the following would support the author of Passage 1 but not the author of Passage 2?

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Question 21 21.

A scientist is testing the actions of a new antibiotic. Bacterial species can be either gram-positive or gram-negative. Gram-positive bacteria turn purple when stained with crystal violet; gram-negative bacteria do not. Bacteria can also be anaerobic or aerobic. Anaerobic bacteria need an oxygen-free environment to live; aerobic bacteria need oxygen. Facultative anaerobes are bacteria that can survive in either environment.

A scientist tested the action of a new antibiotic drug, Drug A, by placing the drug in a petri dish smeared with bacteria and observing how large of an area the antibiotic can clear. The larger the radius of the cleared area, the more powerful the drug is against that particular strain of bacteria. The table below shows the effectiveness of the drug against several different bacterial strains.

The antibiotic was then tested against a new species of bacteria, Species x. On a petri dish smeared with Species x, the radius of the cleared area was 1.1cm. Species x is most likely…

Question 22 22. You nearly failed out of Earth Science. You open the ACT to see a Data Representation passage about geology. Are you in trouble?

Question 23 23.

A scientist is testing the actions of a new antibiotic. Bacterial species can be either gram-positive or gram-negative. Gram-positive bacteria turn purple when stained with crystal violet; gram-negative bacteria do not. Bacteria can also be anaerobic or aerobic. Anaerobic bacteria need an oxygen-free environment to live; aerobic bacteria need oxygen. Facultative anaerobes are bacteria that can survive in either environment.

A scientist tested the action of a new antibiotic drug, Drug A, by placing the drug in a petri dish smeared with bacteria and observing how large of an area the antibiotic can clear. The larger the radius of the cleared area, the more powerful the drug is against that particular strain of bacteria. The table below shows the effectiveness of the drug against several different bacterial strains.

Before conducting this experiment, the scientist hypothesized that Drug A would be effective against gram-negative bacteria only. Was this hypothesis supported by the data?

Question 24 24. Which of the following is a good time-saving strategy?

Question 25 25. You've never taken an astronomy class in your life. On the ACT Science test, you see a passage about astronomy. What should you do?

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Question 26 26. All of the following might show up on a Data Representations passage EXCEPT…

Question 27 27. Which of the following is NOT a type of passage on the ACT Science Reasoning section?

Question 28 28. How should you approach Data Representation passages?

Question 29 29.

In a controversial decision in 2006, Pluto was re-classified from 'planet' to 'dwarf planet,' in part because it does not clear the area around its orbit. The passages below give you the opinion of two scientists on this decision.

Scientist 1

The classification of a 'planet' as distinguished from a 'dwarf planet' or a 'plutoid' is ultimately arbitrary. It does not spring from some self-evident law of the universe, but from the human desire to sort objects into types and classify them by consistent standards. Clearing the neighborhood around its orbit is a standard that humans created for defining our term 'planet' - but what's stopping us from changing that standard? Nothing: the definition is as arbitrary as the collection of syllables we use to refer to it. Linguistic nit-picking, not science, is the reason why Pluto is no longer a 'planet.'

Scientist 2

Scientific language cannot just mean whatever we want it to mean: without a clear and objective definition, terms like 'planet' would be useless. And when we find that an object has been misclassified, the only way to keep our language useful is to re-classify it appropriately, not to simply change words to cover up our own mistakes. This is what has happened with Pluto. It simply does not meet the definition of a 'planet,' and expanding the term 'planet' to cover it would make the word meaningless. However fond our memories of 7th grade Science class might be, the only true solution is to reclassify Pluto.

Which of the following is mentioned in Passage 1, but not Passage 2?

Question 30 30. Which of the following best describes the questions on the ACT Science Reasoning test?

ACT Science Reasoning - Overview: Help and Review Chapter Exam Instructions

Choose your answers to the questions and click 'Next' to see the next set of questions. You can skip questions if you would like and come back to them later with the yellow "Go To First Skipped Question" button. When you have completed the practice exam, a green submit button will appear. Click it to see your results. Good luck!

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