10th Grade Literary Terms & Flashcards

10th Grade Literary Terms & Flashcards
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Second person
A point of view when the narrator addresses the reader with the word 'you'.
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First Person
A point of view from one character that uses the language 'I'.
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Point of View
A way of describing from whose perspective the story is told.
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Internal Conflict
A kind of conflict that happens within a single character.
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Foreshadowing
Hints that suggest what may unfold later in the story.
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Character versus society
An external conflict that involves a character facing issues from the broader community or society at large.
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Character versus nature
An external conflict in which the conflict a character experiences comes from nature or the natural world.
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Character versus Character
An external conflict in which one character opposes or conflicts with another character.
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External Conflict
Conflicts that are not internal to the character, and that happen with other people or nature.
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Antagonist
The character who works in opposition to the protagonist.
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Simile
Like a metaphor, a simile compares two things. Unlike a metaphor, it uses the words 'like' or 'as'.
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Personification
Description of something not human by referring to human characteristics or qualities.
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Onomatopoeia
A word that is pronounced just like what it describes: Splash! Bang! Swish!'
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Metaphor
Like a simile, a metaphor compares two things. Unlike a simile, a metaphor does not use the words 'like' or 'as'. Example: The kitchen is the heart of the home.
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Imagery
Descriptive language used to draw up a sensory image in the mind of the reader.
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Alliteration
Repetition of words that start with the same letter or sound.
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33 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

These flashcards cover a large set of terms that are likely to come up in a 10th grade literature class. Be ready to talk and write about poetry, fiction or non-fiction. These flashcards prepare you to refer to poetic elements, plot development, and types of arguments.

Front
Back
Alliteration
Repetition of words that start with the same letter or sound.
Imagery
Descriptive language used to draw up a sensory image in the mind of the reader.
Metaphor
Like a simile, a metaphor compares two things. Unlike a simile, a metaphor does not use the words 'like' or 'as'. Example: The kitchen is the heart of the home.
Onomatopoeia
A word that is pronounced just like what it describes: Splash! Bang! Swish!'
Personification
Description of something not human by referring to human characteristics or qualities.
Simile
Like a metaphor, a simile compares two things. Unlike a metaphor, it uses the words 'like' or 'as'.
Antagonist
The character who works in opposition to the protagonist.
External Conflict
Conflicts that are not internal to the character, and that happen with other people or nature.
Character versus Character
An external conflict in which one character opposes or conflicts with another character.
Character versus nature
An external conflict in which the conflict a character experiences comes from nature or the natural world.
Character versus society
An external conflict that involves a character facing issues from the broader community or society at large.
Foreshadowing
Hints that suggest what may unfold later in the story.
Internal Conflict
A kind of conflict that happens within a single character.
Point of View
A way of describing from whose perspective the story is told.
First Person
A point of view from one character that uses the language 'I'.
Second person
A point of view when the narrator addresses the reader with the word 'you'.
Third person limited
A point of view that knows and shares the perspective of one character, but which does not speak as 'I' or 'you'.
Third person omniscient
A point of view that can see into the minds and perspectives of all of the story's characters.
Protagonist
The main character in a story.
Setting
When and where the story takes place.
Symbol
Something that signifies more than what it is. For example, a storm can symbolize trouble.
Theme
The main idea of a literary work.
Tone
The attitude, or tone of voice, that an author uses in a piece of literature.
Plot
The events in a story. In other words, what happens.
Climax
The highest point in a plot narrative, and the moment of utmost suspense.
Falling Action
The part of the plot where a story winds down.
Resolution
The conclusion of a story, or how it wraps up and resolves the problem.
Exposition
The background information (setting, characters) that is provided at the start of a story.
Rising Action
The building up of plot between the beginning and the climax.
Ethos
An argument in non-fiction writing that relies on a person's credibility to persuade.
Logos
An argument that relies on logic.
Pathos
An argument that is based on emotion.
Hyperbole
A form of exaggeration, sometimes used by non-fiction writers to be more persuasive.

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