1920s America Flashcards

1920s America Flashcards
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Art Deco
A style of fine art, architecture (like the Chrysler Building in NYC), fashion, and furniture in the 1920s. It featured bold colors and geometric shapes.
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Popular American writers of the 1920s
F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, John Dos Passos
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Prohibition (as it refers to the 1920's US)
Making alcohol illegal. Prohibition was inconsistently enforced and alcohol was widely available illegally.
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Consequences of Prohibition in the 1920s
A huge criminal network sprung up to provide people with the alcohol that they could no longer get legally.
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18th Amendment to the US Constitution
Effective starting from 1920, it prohibited the manufacture or sale of alcohol in the United States.
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Teapot Dome Scandal
Secretary of the Interior Albert Fall secretly allowed oil drilling in land set aside as a national reserve.
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Consumerism in the 1920s
Culture based on buying and selling, driven by increasing amounts of leisure time, cheaper products thanks to mass production, and advances in advertising.
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Harlem Renaissance
An artistic and intellectual African-American movement based in Harlem, New York, in the 1920s.
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Henry Ford
A wealthy industrialist whose assembly-line production technique for automobiles put car ownership within reach of the middle class.
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Model T
A new model of car, developed by industrialist Henry Ford, made cars affordable for the middle class.
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Effects of the spread and development of the personal automobile in the 1920s:
Increased mobility for ordinary and new industries including gas stations and hotels.
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Flashcard Content Overview

The 1920s saw an explosion of culture, music, and the arts, much of it produced by the African-American leaders of the Harlem Renaissance. But the same years also saw a shocking re-emergence of violent racist and anti-immigrant sentiment. Use these flashcards to drill yourself on the 1920s, including the rise of consumer culture, the struggle over teaching evolution in public schools, the unsuccessful attempt to ban alcohol, and the racial and ethnic tensions that sometimes erupted into violence.

Front
Back
Effects of the spread and development of the personal automobile in the 1920s:
Increased mobility for ordinary and new industries including gas stations and hotels.
Model T
A new model of car, developed by industrialist Henry Ford, made cars affordable for the middle class.
Henry Ford
A wealthy industrialist whose assembly-line production technique for automobiles put car ownership within reach of the middle class.
Harlem Renaissance
An artistic and intellectual African-American movement based in Harlem, New York, in the 1920s.
Consumerism in the 1920s
Culture based on buying and selling, driven by increasing amounts of leisure time, cheaper products thanks to mass production, and advances in advertising.
Teapot Dome Scandal
Secretary of the Interior Albert Fall secretly allowed oil drilling in land set aside as a national reserve.
18th Amendment to the US Constitution
Effective starting from 1920, it prohibited the manufacture or sale of alcohol in the United States.
Consequences of Prohibition in the 1920s
A huge criminal network sprung up to provide people with the alcohol that they could no longer get legally.
Prohibition (as it refers to the 1920's US)
Making alcohol illegal. Prohibition was inconsistently enforced and alcohol was widely available illegally.
Popular American writers of the 1920s
F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, John Dos Passos
Art Deco
A style of fine art, architecture (like the Chrysler Building in NYC), fashion, and furniture in the 1920s. It featured bold colors and geometric shapes.
Langston Hughes
A poet of the 1920s; one of the most influential figures in the Harlem Renaissance.
Harlem Renaissance
An intellectual and artistic movement of the 1920s focused on the expression of African-American culture.
W. E. B. Du Bois
A writer and civil rights activist who played a key role in the Harlem Renaissance.
Ku Klux Klan (as it existed in the 1920s)
A national organization focused on moral reform. The Klan attacked immigrants, Jews, Black people, and Catholics.
Sacco and Vanzetti Trial
A trial of two Italian anarchists, Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti. The men were convicted, probably thanks mostly to anti-anarchist and anti-immigrant sentiment.
Ways the Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s attracted new followers:
Using modern advertising and business techniques; playing on powerful fears of immigrants, Catholics, and other groups.
A. Mitchell Palmer
Attorney General who led raids against suspected Communists in the 1920s after his home was bombed.
Intelligence Division of the Justice Department (later called the FBI)
A new office set up to investigate Communist threats after Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer was sent a bomb in the mail.
Scopes Trial of 1925
A trial contesting the right of a biology teacher to teach public school students about evolution.
Scottsboro Boys
A group of young African-American men accused and convicted of rape in 1931 on dubious evidence.
Norris v. Alabama
A Supreme Court case in which the Court ultimately found that nine Black men (the Scottsboro Boys) had been denied a fair trial because none of their race were allowed in juries.

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