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1970s America Flashcards

1970s America Flashcards
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Gerald Ford
Sworn in as U.S. President after Nixon's resignation in 1973. Ford's term was marked by stagflation, and high interest and unemployment rates. In 1976, Ford lost the election to Jimmy Carter.
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Camp David Accords
An agreement forged by President Jimmy Carter in 1978 that temporarily put a halt to the hostilities between Egypt and Israel.
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Causes of the Watergate Scandal
In June 1972, five men with Nixon affiliation were arrested for attempting to install surveillance equipment at the Democratic Party's headquarters, the Watergate complex.
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Roe v. Wade
The landmark 1973 Supreme Court ruling that the constitutional right to privacy extended to a woman's right to have an abortion. The ruling set the precedent for legalized abortion in the U.S.
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Vietnamization
During the Vietnam War, the transferal of the war effort from the United States to the people of South Vietnam.
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11 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

This flashcard set covers the U.S. presidencies of Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, and Jimmy Carter during the turbulent 1970s. In this section, you will learn about the key foreign and domestic issues the United States faced during this decade. These include policies such as Vietnamization and Triangular Diplomacy, and events such as the Roe v. Wade ruling, the Pentagon Papers incident, the Watergate Scandal, the Camp David Accords, and the 1973 Oil Embargo.

Front
Back
Vietnamization
During the Vietnam War, the transferal of the war effort from the United States to the people of South Vietnam.
Roe v. Wade
The landmark 1973 Supreme Court ruling that the constitutional right to privacy extended to a woman's right to have an abortion. The ruling set the precedent for legalized abortion in the U.S.
Causes of the Watergate Scandal
In June 1972, five men with Nixon affiliation were arrested for attempting to install surveillance equipment at the Democratic Party's headquarters, the Watergate complex.
Camp David Accords
An agreement forged by President Jimmy Carter in 1978 that temporarily put a halt to the hostilities between Egypt and Israel.
Gerald Ford
Sworn in as U.S. President after Nixon's resignation in 1973. Ford's term was marked by stagflation, and high interest and unemployment rates. In 1976, Ford lost the election to Jimmy Carter.
Triangular Diplomacy
A 1969 attempt by President Richard Nixon to cool relations between the United States, the Soviet Union, and China, with intention to reduce support for Communist Vietnam.
1973 Oil Embargo
An embargo on Middle Eastern oil launched by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. This was done in response to U.S. President Nixon removing the U.S. dollar from the gold standard.
The Pentagon Papers
A history of American involvement in the Vietnam War leaked in 1971 by a national security worker. President Nixon ordered staff to stop this leak and discredit the employee responsible for it.
Effects of the 1973 Oil Embargo
The Embargo led to increased inflation and U.S. unemployment rates. Congress was forced to ration the amount of gasoline Americans could purchase. The price of goods derived from oil increased.
Richard Nixon
In 1969, Nixon became U.S. President, tasked chiefly with ending the Vietnam War. He was responsible for key policies including Triangular Diplomacy, the Nixon Doctrine, and Vietnamization.
U.S. v. Nixon
In 1974, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Nixon's use of executive privilege with regards to the Watergate Scandal constituted grounds for impeachment. Nixon subsequently resigned.

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