9th Grade English Vocabulary Flashcards

9th Grade English Vocabulary Flashcards
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Digital Media
Any communication delivered by computer, including text, graphics and video.
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Credible Sources
Trustworthy and believable sources including encyclopedias, museum web sites and textbooks, as compared to less trustworthy sources such as social media.
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Prepositional Phrase
A preposition and noun that provide information about another noun in a sentence. In the sentence 'I baked a cake for John,' the word 'for' is the preposition that precedes the noun 'John.'
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Preposition
The first word in a prepositional phrase. Common prepositions include 'for,' 'at,' 'around,' 'about,' 'in,' 'by,' 'toward,' 'over,' and 'through.'
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Nominative Pronouns
Pronouns that are usually the subject of a sentence, including 'I,' 'he,' 'she,' and 'it,' 'we,' 'they,' and 'you.'
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Infinitive
The simplest form of a verb. For example, the word 'run' is the infinitive for the words 'runs' or 'ran;' 'talk' is the infinitive for 'talking' or 'talked.'
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Conjunctive Adverbs
Connecting words that bring together two related phrases or clauses, such as 'however,' 'also,' 'instead,' 'furthermore,' 'meanwhile,' and 'then.'
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Colon
A punctuation mark used to introduce a quote or list, and to separate clauses where one clause introduces the next. For example, My Christmas list includes: new sneakers, a doll and a bicycle.
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16 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

Students in ninth grade are expected to know certain academic vocabulary words involving grammar, research and literary analysis. These flashcards simplify important grammatical terms such as 'conjunctive adverb' and 'nominative pronouns,' help teach you to learn the difference between credible and not credible primary and secondary sources, and help you remember the difference between a simile and a pun.

Front
Back
Colon
A punctuation mark used to introduce a quote or list, and to separate clauses where one clause introduces the next. For example, My Christmas list includes: new sneakers, a doll and a bicycle.
Conjunctive Adverbs
Connecting words that bring together two related phrases or clauses, such as 'however,' 'also,' 'instead,' 'furthermore,' 'meanwhile,' and 'then.'
Infinitive
The simplest form of a verb. For example, the word 'run' is the infinitive for the words 'runs' or 'ran;' 'talk' is the infinitive for 'talking' or 'talked.'
Nominative Pronouns
Pronouns that are usually the subject of a sentence, including 'I,' 'he,' 'she,' and 'it,' 'we,' 'they,' and 'you.'
Preposition
The first word in a prepositional phrase. Common prepositions include 'for,' 'at,' 'around,' 'about,' 'in,' 'by,' 'toward,' 'over,' and 'through.'
Prepositional Phrase
A preposition and noun that provide information about another noun in a sentence. In the sentence 'I baked a cake for John,' the word 'for' is the preposition that precedes the noun 'John.'
Credible Sources
Trustworthy and believable sources including encyclopedias, museum web sites and textbooks, as compared to less trustworthy sources such as social media.
Digital Media
Any communication delivered by computer, including text, graphics and video.
Primary Source
An original document or eyewitness account, including journals, letters, photographs, and government publications.
Secondary Source
A recounting of an event based on an interview or a primary source. For example, an interview quoted in a newspaper would be a secondary source.
Fallacy
Illogical thinking. For example, saying that all people with red hair are bad based on a single example is a fallacy.
Imagery
The use of descriptive, sensory words to create visualization, allowing the reader to imagine how an image looks, feels, sounds and smells.
Pun
A play on words; using words that sound the same but have different meanings.
Rhetorical Question
A question not expected to illicit an answered. For example, 'Why bother?' is a question intended to express frustration, not prompt an answer.
Simile
The comparison of two things using 'like' or 'as.' For example, 'The traffic is moving as slow as molasses.'
Less Credible Sources
Sources that are not always trustworthy, including those found on social media, tabloids, and advertisements.

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