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American Imperialism Flashcards

American Imperialism Flashcards
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General Valeriano Weyler
A Spanish general whose mistreatment of Cuban civilians helped draw the United States into the Spanish-American War
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Imperialism
When one nation tries to increase its power and influence in the world, either through military strength or through diplomacy.
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U.S.S. Maine
A US battleship destroyed in a mysterious explosion in a Cuban harbor. This was the last straw for the US when it came to entering the Spanish-American War
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Joseph Pulitzer
A famous newspaper owner in the early 20th century who used yellow journalism to work up public anger against Spain
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Yellow Journalism
A highly sensationalized style of reporting that aims to sell more papers by inflaming public opinion
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The De Lome Letter
A letter critical of US President McKinley, which was stolen from the Spanish ambassador Enrique Dupuy de Lome and published in an American newspaper.
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Flashcard Content Overview

Imperialism wasn't just a European phenomenon! These flashcards focus on American imperialism, especially in Latin America. You'll learn about American involvement in Cuba and the developments that ultimately led to the Spanish-American War as the US clashed with European powers about who got to interfere in the Americas. You'll also see how American international involvement got a lot more complicated with the sinking of the Lusitania and the start of World War I, and with the Treaty of Versailles that ended the war and founded the League of Nations.

Front
Back
The De Lome Letter
A letter critical of US President McKinley, which was stolen from the Spanish ambassador Enrique Dupuy de Lome and published in an American newspaper.
Yellow Journalism
A highly sensationalized style of reporting that aims to sell more papers by inflaming public opinion
Joseph Pulitzer
A famous newspaper owner in the early 20th century who used yellow journalism to work up public anger against Spain
U.S.S. Maine
A US battleship destroyed in a mysterious explosion in a Cuban harbor. This was the last straw for the US when it came to entering the Spanish-American War
Imperialism
When one nation tries to increase its power and influence in the world, either through military strength or through diplomacy.
General Valeriano Weyler
A Spanish general whose mistreatment of Cuban civilians helped draw the United States into the Spanish-American War
Paris Peace Conference
The conference where the victorious Allied powers determined what they would do with the defeated Central powers after WWI.
Treaty of Versailles
The treaty that officially ended World War I. Its harsh terms and demands for economic reparations were bitterly resented by the defeated Central powers, especially Germany.
Archduke Franz Ferdinand
The crown prince of Austria-Hungary, whose assassination in 1914 sparked the First World War
Consequences of the alliance system before World War I
Nations were very vulnerable to being pulled into each others' wars, so a small conflict between two countries could quickly explode into a global crisis.
The Lusitania
A British passenger liner sunk by German U-boats in World War I. The large number of American passengers aboard the ship provoked American anger towards Germany.
Reasons why the United States wanted to stay neutral before the First World War
Europe was geographically distant; many Americans had ethnic roots on both sides of the conflict so picking a side would inevitably anger part of the population;
The Platt Amendment
Prohibited any European intervention in Cuba but gave America license to interfere if European powers violated it.

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