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Analyzing American Literature Flashcards

Analyzing American Literature Flashcards
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Literary Analysis: Step 1 - Setting Comprehension
The first part of literary analysis. It involves developing an understanding of where and when a story is taking place.
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Literary Analysis: Step 5 - Character Analysis
You dig deeper into the motivations and goals of characters when working on this part of literary analysis.
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Literary Analysis: Step 7 - Author Style and Language Analysis
You complete this step in literary analysis by examining the style choices an author made. It might even involve looking at the sentence types they used.
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Literary Analysis: Step 8 - Drawing Conclusions
The final step of literary analysis. At this stage you look at everything you considered to think about the writer's theme and what the story says to you.
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Literary Analysis: Step 2 - Character Comprehension
You complete this part of literary analysis by understanding who the characters are.
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Literary Analysis: Step 6 - Plot Analysis
A step in literary analysis that involves dissecting the plot, paying special attention to the plot's essential elements.
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Literary Analysis: Step 4 - Setting Analysis
During this step of the literary analysis process you look at what is said or implied about the setting and see how if it affects the piece, including the tone.
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Setting
When discussing literature, this is where a piece of fiction takes place. It also involves the time period when the story is set.
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Mood
How a piece of literature makes you feel. You may think of horror and suspense as examples of this.
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Theme
The term used to describe a literary work's main idea.
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Dramatic Irony
A type of irony that occurs when the readers are aware of things that aren't known by the characters in the story.
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Tone
This is the writer's attitude towards his or her work. Examples may include being dramatic of funny.
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Diction
The word choices used by an author. This can be used to bring to mind specific imagery and to set up the tone of a piece.
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Interior Monologue
A tool used in some plays. Characters deliver these directly to the audience. They usually involve talking about the character's feelings or thoughts.
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Flashback
You use literary tool when you examine something that happened prior to the events that are occurring in the present.
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Motif
The term used to describe a reference or symbol that is used over and over again in a literary work.
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33 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

You can go over each step in the process of literary analysis with these flashcards. These cards also cover different types of narrators, including limited and omniscient narrators. Common literary and rhetorical devices will be discussed by the cards in this set. Additionally, these cards review the characteristics of Romanticism, Victorianism and Modernism.

Front
Back
Motif
The term used to describe a reference or symbol that is used over and over again in a literary work.
Flashback
You use literary tool when you examine something that happened prior to the events that are occurring in the present.
Interior Monologue
A tool used in some plays. Characters deliver these directly to the audience. They usually involve talking about the character's feelings or thoughts.
Diction
The word choices used by an author. This can be used to bring to mind specific imagery and to set up the tone of a piece.
Tone
This is the writer's attitude towards his or her work. Examples may include being dramatic of funny.
Dramatic Irony
A type of irony that occurs when the readers are aware of things that aren't known by the characters in the story.
Theme
The term used to describe a literary work's main idea.
Mood
How a piece of literature makes you feel. You may think of horror and suspense as examples of this.
Setting
When discussing literature, this is where a piece of fiction takes place. It also involves the time period when the story is set.
Literary Analysis: Step 4 - Setting Analysis
During this step of the literary analysis process you look at what is said or implied about the setting and see how if it affects the piece, including the tone.
Literary Analysis: Step 6 - Plot Analysis
A step in literary analysis that involves dissecting the plot, paying special attention to the plot's essential elements.
Literary Analysis: Step 2 - Character Comprehension
You complete this part of literary analysis by understanding who the characters are.
Literary Analysis: Step 8 - Drawing Conclusions
The final step of literary analysis. At this stage you look at everything you considered to think about the writer's theme and what the story says to you.
Literary Analysis: Step 7 - Author Style and Language Analysis
You complete this step in literary analysis by examining the style choices an author made. It might even involve looking at the sentence types they used.
Literary Analysis: Step 5 - Character Analysis
You dig deeper into the motivations and goals of characters when working on this part of literary analysis.
Literary Analysis: Step 1 - Setting Comprehension
The first part of literary analysis. It involves developing an understanding of where and when a story is taking place.
Literary Analysis: Step 3 - Plot Comprehension
Completing this step in literary analysis means you understand the story's basic plot.
Main Areas of Literary Analysis: Comprehension
This aspect of literary analysis deals with comprehending the characters, plots and setting of a piece. If a story doesn't make sense at all, you might need to focus more on this area.
Romantics
Members of the Romantic literary movement that took place towards the beginning of the 19th century. These writers valued nature and individual desires above being strictly rational.
Modernists
Writers in in the Modern movement. These writers largely worked at the beginning of the 20th century. They valued art purely for itself and spent a lot of time questioning the world.
Victorians
A group of writers who produced works towards the end of the 19th century. The novel became very popular during this time period and a lot of focus was put on virtue and working hard.
Foreshadowing
You use this literary device when you hint at upcoming plot points through clues in the text.
Red Herring
A literary trick that tries to misdirect readers to assume things that will later turn out to be false.
Backstory
These are events that occurred prior to the main plot of a story. They may be used to provide more information about characters.
B-plot
The term used to refer to the secondary story that is included in some pieces of literature. This plot doesn't drive the story, but it does exist in the background.
Alliteration
A rhetorical device that you can use by repeating the same consonant sound throughout your work. Tongue twisters often include this.
Metaphor
Writers make use of this rhetorical device when they use a symbol to represent something else in their work, such as the story's theme.
Anaphora
This rhetorical device involves repeating certain phrases or words to give them extra importance.
Polysyndeton
You can use this rhetorical device by using multiple conjunctions in a row.
Unreliable Narrator
A narrator who isn't necessarily truthful about what's going on.
Third Person Omniscient Narrator
This type of narrator knows everything about the story as well as the motivations and thoughts of any characters included in the story.
Third Person Limited Narrator
A kind of narrator who knows everything about only one character in the story, giving them a narrowed perspective.
Multiple Narrators
Some writers choose to include more than one narrator in their story, which can give readers more perspectives about what's happening in the plot.

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