Analyzing American Poetry & Prose Flashcards

Analyzing American Poetry & Prose Flashcards
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Hyperbole
You do this in writing if you try to make things more dramatic by hugely exaggerating something.
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Alliteration
This occurs when you put at least two words that have syllables that sound similar beside one another. She sells sea shells is an example.
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Apostrophe
You're using this literary technique if you address an unliving, or dead, thing as though it were alive. If you write a poem to a country, treating it like a living thing, it would be this.
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Sonnet
A kind of poetic stanza that includes 14 lines.
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Triplet
If you use this kind of poetic stanza, it will have only three lines.
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Couplet
This type of poetic stanza only has two lines.
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Quatrain
A poetic stanza comprised of four lines.
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Synecdoche
Working with this literary technique involves using part of something to stand in for the entirety of the thing.
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Onomatopoeia
A technique that uses words that represent and are similar to a sound. Bang is an example of this kind of word.
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Metaphor
To use this literary technique you would directly say one thing is another. If you write that your eyes are diamonds, it's an example of this.
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Personification
You can use this literary technique by treating something that isn't human as though it is. If you write about an animal and treat it as though it has emotions, you are doing this.
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Simile
A method used to compare two different things. To make this comparison you would use the words 'as' or 'like.'
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Symbolism
A literary technique that involves using one thing to stand in for another.
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27 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

Working with these flashcards can give you the chance to review the uses of symbolism, metaphors, allegory, allusion and apostrophe in writing. You'll also find cards that address hyperbole, verbal irony, personification and onomatopoeia. You can focus on the definitions of protagonists, antagonists and archetypes. These cards also cover the differences between couplets, triplets, quatrains and sonnets. Additionally, you'll be able to go over trochaic and iambic meters in poetry.

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Symbolism
A literary technique that involves using one thing to stand in for another.
Simile
A method used to compare two different things. To make this comparison you would use the words 'as' or 'like.'
Personification
You can use this literary technique by treating something that isn't human as though it is. If you write about an animal and treat it as though it has emotions, you are doing this.
Metaphor
To use this literary technique you would directly say one thing is another. If you write that your eyes are diamonds, it's an example of this.
Onomatopoeia
A technique that uses words that represent and are similar to a sound. Bang is an example of this kind of word.
Synecdoche
Working with this literary technique involves using part of something to stand in for the entirety of the thing.
Quatrain
A poetic stanza comprised of four lines.
Couplet
This type of poetic stanza only has two lines.
Triplet
If you use this kind of poetic stanza, it will have only three lines.
Sonnet
A kind of poetic stanza that includes 14 lines.
Apostrophe
You're using this literary technique if you address an unliving, or dead, thing as though it were alive. If you write a poem to a country, treating it like a living thing, it would be this.
Alliteration
This occurs when you put at least two words that have syllables that sound similar beside one another. She sells sea shells is an example.
Hyperbole
You do this in writing if you try to make things more dramatic by hugely exaggerating something.
Verbal Irony
A special type of irony that involves using spoken words in a manner that conflicts with their actual meaning.
Theme
In writing, this term is used to refer to the story's main point.
Symbol
An item or object used to stand in for something else.
Allusion
A reference by a writer to something that exists outside of his or her narrative. If you reference other novels in your writing it would be an example of this.
Allegory
A bunch of metaphors or symbols that have been spread out into a sequence to tell a story or impart a lesson, usually with a concealed meaning.
Anti-Hero
A non-traditional protagonist who might have negative character traits. Audiences are still supposed to pull for this kind of character.
Protagonist
The main character in a piece of fiction. This character should be responsible for moving the action along.
Antagonist

The term used to refer to whatever the protagonist is in conflict with. It may be another character or even an idea.

Archetype
These literary figures get repeated in different cultures and at different periods of time. They may be themes, character types or even places that get used again and again.
Rhyme Scheme
The pattern of rhymes found at the end of each line in a poem. It's usually recorded by using the same letter to denote lines that rhyme with one another and listing the letters.
Identify the rhyme scheme in this poem: Had a cat / It was fat / Gave it away/ There it sat
AABA
Trochaic Meter
A poetic meter that involves feet with two syllables, with the first stressed and the second unstressed.
Iambic Meter
If you write poetry in this meter, each poetic foot has two syllables. The first will be unstressed and the second will be stressed.
Poetic Foot
The individual rhythm units found in works of poetry.

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