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Ancient Roman Architecture, Sculpture & Mosaics Flashcards

Ancient Roman Architecture, Sculpture & Mosaics Flashcards
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Roman Architecture: Temple of Vesta

A temple dedicated to the goddess of family.

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Roman Architecture: Maison Carree

A Roman temple found in Nimes, France.

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Roman Architecture: The Pantheon

A temple built in the 2nd century.

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Roman Architecture: Cella

This was the main room in square temples in Rome. It could contain the temple's altar.

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Aqueducts

Elevated channels used by the Romans to move water over long distances. These constructions depended on arches and the use of masonry.

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Cement

The Romans invented this by mixing volcanic ash, water, and lime. It is a type of liquid rock that dries and becomes solid. It was used to make huge monuments by connecting small blocks.

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Pozzolana

This volcanic ash was very fine. The Romans found it in Southern Italy and combined it with water and lime to make a type of concrete that was very sturdy and useful for making large buildings.

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Roman Wall Murals: Fourth Style

We see this Roman wall mural style appearing after 50 A.D. It featured linear designs with 'windows' that showed random pictures. It could be very chaotic.

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Roman Wall Murals: Third Style

The style of wall murals that was popular in Rome from around 15 B.C. to 50 A.D. It involved landscapes that were small and very detailed as well as linear patterns.

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Roman Wall Murals: Second Style

A style used for wall murals in Rome after around 80 B.C. This style strove to make it seem like the wall didn't exist and that a room when further back.

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Roman Wall Murals: First Style

This wall mural style was used in the time of the Roman Republic. You can recognize it by the characteristic attempt to make the wall look like it was made with marble.

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Capitoline Wolf

An Etruscan statue of a female wolf protecting and feeding a pair of human children. It depicts the legend around the founding of Rome, showing the connection between the two cultures.

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Etruscan Art: Statues

This culture used terracotta and bronze to create statues. They are found today in the remains of temples or in tombs.

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Etruscan Art: Tomb

This culture created murals in underground burial chambers. They differed from the tomb art of other peoples in that they showed day-to-day scenes, not religious images.

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29 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

Working with the flashcards contained in this set can help you focus on prominent pieces of Roman architecture, including:

  • The Colosseum
  • Trajan's Column
  • The Arch of Titus
  • The Pantheon
  • The Temple of Vesta
  • The Temple of Bacchus

You can review the four styles of Roman wall murals and the importance of cement to Roman construction. The impact of various emperors on Roman art is also addressed by this set.

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Etruscan Art: Tomb

This culture created murals in underground burial chambers. They differed from the tomb art of other peoples in that they showed day-to-day scenes, not religious images.

Etruscan Art: Statues

This culture used terracotta and bronze to create statues. They are found today in the remains of temples or in tombs.

Capitoline Wolf

An Etruscan statue of a female wolf protecting and feeding a pair of human children. It depicts the legend around the founding of Rome, showing the connection between the two cultures.

Roman Wall Murals: First Style

This wall mural style was used in the time of the Roman Republic. You can recognize it by the characteristic attempt to make the wall look like it was made with marble.

Roman Wall Murals: Second Style

A style used for wall murals in Rome after around 80 B.C. This style strove to make it seem like the wall didn't exist and that a room when further back.

Roman Wall Murals: Third Style

The style of wall murals that was popular in Rome from around 15 B.C. to 50 A.D. It involved landscapes that were small and very detailed as well as linear patterns.

Roman Wall Murals: Fourth Style

We see this Roman wall mural style appearing after 50 A.D. It featured linear designs with 'windows' that showed random pictures. It could be very chaotic.

Pozzolana

This volcanic ash was very fine. The Romans found it in Southern Italy and combined it with water and lime to make a type of concrete that was very sturdy and useful for making large buildings.

Cement

The Romans invented this by mixing volcanic ash, water, and lime. It is a type of liquid rock that dries and becomes solid. It was used to make huge monuments by connecting small blocks.

Aqueducts

Elevated channels used by the Romans to move water over long distances. These constructions depended on arches and the use of masonry.

Roman Architecture: Cella

This was the main room in square temples in Rome. It could contain the temple's altar.

Roman Architecture: The Pantheon

A temple built in the 2nd century.

Roman Architecture: Maison Carree

A Roman temple found in Nimes, France.

Roman Architecture: Temple of Vesta

A temple dedicated to the goddess of family.

Roman Architecture: Temple of Bacchus

A rectangular temple for the god of wine.

Roman Architecture: Temples

These buildings were dedicated to one or more gods. They were usually either round, such as those dedicated to Vesta, or square.

Greek Culture: Impact on Rome

This culture contributed to Roman religion, art, and architecture. The Romans also adopted the alphabet of this people.

Triumphal Arches

Giant curved doorways found in front of the Forum in Rome. Emperors were allowed to march under these when returning to Rome after conquering something.

Roman Forum: Location

This is found between the Velian and Capitoline Hills, which were said to be controlled by rivals. Its location indicates the rivals were making an alliance.

Roman Architecture: The Colosseum

A large oval building used for entertainment.

The Colosseum: Construction

This massive building was built following the Great Jewish Revolt of 70 A.D. Many Jewish prisoners were enslaved and forced to help construct it.

The Colosseum: Changes by Emperor Domitian

This ruler set up underground tunnels for this building and added a top-level where women, slaves, and the common poor could watch what was going on.

The Colosseum: Special Seating

This building was designed with private booths for certain figures. The emperor has a special booth in the north, while the Priestesses of Vesta and the Vestal Virgins has a place in the south.

Emperor Augustus: Impact on Roman Art

This man was the first to serve as Emperor of Rome. He wanted an idealized portrait to show his power, leading to less realism in art.

Emperor Vespasian: Impact on Roman Art

The emperor who came after Nero. He desired to seem like he had respect for the people and so shifted art back towards verism, or a focus on realistic details.

Emperor Hadrian: Impact on Roman Art

This emperor valued philosophy and being seen as an artist. He tried to focus on learning and to lessen wars, leading to personal and emotional art work.

Roman Architecture: The Arch of Titus

This marks the sacking of Jerusalem's temple.

Roman Architecture: Trajan's Column

A column made after defeating the Dacians.

Brick and Mortar Masonry

This construction improvement developed by the Romans used small, heat-cast blocks pasted together. It was a very durable process and could be used for large structures.

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