Argumentative Essay Vocabulary List & Flashcards

Argumentative Essay Vocabulary List & Flashcards
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Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: 'Providing free college education would help close this country's wage gap.'
Reason
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Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: 'Homework should not be assigned in schools.'
Position
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Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: 'John Smith is the best candidate to be mayor of River Heights.'
Position
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Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: 'The minimum wage in the United States should be $15 per hour.'
Position
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Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: 'College education in the United States should be free for everyone.'
Position
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Five Paragraph Essay
Essays (sometimes argumentative) which include an introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion.
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Counterargument
An explanation about why opponents to an argument are incorrect in their beliefs. Also called 'counters.'
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Evidence
Facts and data that support the arguments of the author.
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Reasons
Arguments or information explaining why the author believes he or she is correct.
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Position
A stance, opinion, or claim held by the author on a given topic.
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Argumentative Essay
A written piece of work meant to persuade the reader to agree with the author's position on a given topic.
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22 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

Argumentative Essays are written to persuade your reader to agree with you. It is important that they have a clearly stated position, which is the opinion you are trying to share. To be effective, be sure to include reasons why you believe you are correct in your opinion, and back these reasons up with evidence. It is also helpful to predict the arguments of opponents, and provide counterarguments to address those concerns.

In order to help you identify the parts of an argumentative essay, many of the flashcards in this set will reference a hypothetical essay on one of the following four topics:

  • An argumentative essay in support of John Smith as a candidate for mayor of the town of River Heights.
  • An argumentative essay in support of raising the minimum wage to $15 per hour.
  • An argumentative essay in support of ending the practice of assigning homework in schools.
  • An argumentative essay in support of free college tuition nationwide.

Keep these topics in mind when using this flashcard set.

Front
Back
Argumentative Essay
A written piece of work meant to persuade the reader to agree with the author's position on a given topic.
Position
A stance, opinion, or claim held by the author on a given topic.
Reasons
Arguments or information explaining why the author believes he or she is correct.
Evidence
Facts and data that support the arguments of the author.
Counterargument
An explanation about why opponents to an argument are incorrect in their beliefs. Also called 'counters.'
Five Paragraph Essay
Essays (sometimes argumentative) which include an introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion.
Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: 'College education in the United States should be free for everyone.'
Position
Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: 'The minimum wage in the United States should be $15 per hour.'
Position
Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: 'John Smith is the best candidate to be mayor of River Heights.'
Position
Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: 'Homework should not be assigned in schools.'
Position
Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: 'Providing free college education would help close this country's wage gap.'
Reason
Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: 'John Smith has more experience serving this city than any of the other candidates.'
Reason
Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: 'The current minimum wage is not considered a livable wage.'
Reason
Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: 'Most students don't like homework and therefore will not see the value in it.'
Reason
Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: 'His record is so strong that the newspaper just endorsed him in the mayoral race.'
Evidence
Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: '50% of prospective students do not enroll in college due to the tuition cost.'
Evidence
Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: '90% of those making the current minimum wage struggle with debt.'
Evidence
Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: 'In districts that abolished homework, test scores went up 20%.'
Evidence
Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: 'Critics suggest Smith is too old to serve, but our current mayor is 10 years older.'
Counterargument
Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: 'Teachers say homework offers important practice, but there's no evidence to support this.'
Counterargument
Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: 'Some say a higher wage would hurt small business, but many business owners disagree.'
Counterargument
Identify whether the statement is a position, a reason, a piece of evidence, or a counterargument: 'Many argue that a college education isn't necessary for success. Economists disagree.'
Counterargument

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