Copyright

Attraction & Close Relationships Flashcards

Attraction & Close Relationships Flashcards
1/16 (missed) 0 0
Create Your Account To Continue Studying

As a member, you'll also get unlimited access to over 79,000 lessons in math, English, science, history, and more. Plus, get practice tests, quizzes, and personalized coaching to help you succeed.

Try it risk-free
Try it risk-free for 30 days. Cancel anytime
Already registered? Log in here for access
Social exchange theory
A theory stating that the relationships we start and continue are the ones in which we experience the most benefits with the least costs
Got it
The equity theory of love
The idea that couples are more satisfied in a relationship when there is an equal amount given and received by each partner
Got it
Non-love
The relationship shared between an acquaintance, this type of love lacks the three essential components of intimacy, passion, and commitment.
Got it
Stages of relationship dissolution
In order, the four stages are intrapersonal, dyadic, social, and another intrapersonal stage.
Got it
Sternberg's Triangular Theory of Love
A theory that explains love as being made up of three separate elements: intimacy, commitment, and passion
Got it
The halo effect
A tendency to generalize and judge specific characteristics in a person based on how that person looks; e.g., thinking someone who is well-groomed is more intelligent than someone who's not
Got it
7:10 ratio
The waist-to-hip ratio in women considered to be the most attractive
Got it
Proximity
According to the propinquity effect, this is the strongest indicator of potentially liking someone.
Got it
16 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

This flashcard set covering attraction and close relationships will give you a chance to quiz yourself on the ratio of 7:10, the Westgate studies, and Sternberg's Triangular Theory of Love. Other topics that you can explore include the halo effect, social exchange theory, attachment theory of love, and evolutionary theory of love. Additionally, see what you know about avoidance and withdrawal, the mere exposure effect, proximity, ingratiation, and stages of relationship dissolution.

Front
Back
Proximity
According to the propinquity effect, this is the strongest indicator of potentially liking someone.
7:10 ratio
The waist-to-hip ratio in women considered to be the most attractive
The halo effect
A tendency to generalize and judge specific characteristics in a person based on how that person looks; e.g., thinking someone who is well-groomed is more intelligent than someone who's not
Sternberg's Triangular Theory of Love
A theory that explains love as being made up of three separate elements: intimacy, commitment, and passion
Stages of relationship dissolution
In order, the four stages are intrapersonal, dyadic, social, and another intrapersonal stage.
Non-love
The relationship shared between an acquaintance, this type of love lacks the three essential components of intimacy, passion, and commitment.
The equity theory of love
The idea that couples are more satisfied in a relationship when there is an equal amount given and received by each partner
Social exchange theory
A theory stating that the relationships we start and continue are the ones in which we experience the most benefits with the least costs
The attachment theory of love
This theory says that the type of romantic love a person has in adulthood is determined by the relationship that person had with his or her primary caregiver in childhood.
The evolutionary theory of love
This idea theorizes that love acts as the reason for reproduction and the ensuing care for the offspring that result from the relationship.
Avoidance/withdrawal
One of the disengagement strategies used in ending relationships, according to Leslie Baxter. This technique involves pulling away emotionally and physically, with the goal of ending the relationship without confrontation.
Functional proximity
This considers how often individuals cross paths; relates to the propinquity effect
Mere exposure effect
The idea that being repeatedly exposed to some kind of stimulus, such as a song or an image, will increase your liking for it; also known as the familiarity principle.
Westgate Studies
An experiment performed with student apartments at M.I.T. to observe the effects of proximity on interaction and relationship development
Ingratiation
Using flattery to gain the favor of another person
Disadvantages of the halo effect
False impressions and the preferential treatment given to attractive people are examples of problems with this effect

To unlock this flashcard set you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member

Already a member? Log In

Support