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Audience Analysis in Public Speaking Flashcards

Audience Analysis in Public Speaking Flashcards
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Audience analysis
Reviewing information about the audience can help speakers to create speeches about unfamiliar topics because they can try to make connections between the topic and the audience's experiences.
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Audience-centered speech
A speech based on the audience's background so they can identify with the material. For example, a heart doctor speaking to senior citizens may speak about the health benefits of being active.
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Results of reviewing the psychographics of a group of listeners
A review of the psychographics can give the speaker information about the group members' ages, religious beliefs and interest in the subject matter of the speech
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How to create a speech for listeners that do not know much about the topic
A speaker can learn more about the audience and try to make comparisons to situations with which they may already be familiar
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Holding the interest of the listeners during a speech
To do this, a speaker can try to use examples of things that will help them to understand the items being discussed in the presentation
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Using psychographics to appeal to the people listening to a speech
A speaker who appears to have reached the listeners has probably reviewed and used the psychographics for the group.
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Helping an audience to stay focused on the topic of a speech
Speakers can do this by talking a little bit more about the topic of the speech and by reviewing similar items noted in the speech.
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Meaning of the percentage of people in the audience with questions at the end of a speech
If a very big percentage of the people listening to the speech want to ask questions in means that they were paying attention and would like more information
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Non-verbal cues of audience attention

Signs the audience isn't paying attention, e.g.

Not looking at the speaker

Negative facial expressions

Moving around in their seats

Not nodding their heads

Not answering questions posed by the speaker

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19 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

This flashcard set covers topics from how to review information about the habits and belief systems of a group of listeners to prepare for a speech, to how commonly used terms should be included. Learn about how speakers incorporate information about the surrounding area to keep the listeners interested. Find out more about the questions listeners ask at the end of the speech and how they prepare speeches for special audiences like senior citizens.

Front
Back
Non-verbal cues of audience attention

Signs the audience isn't paying attention, e.g.

Not looking at the speaker

Negative facial expressions

Moving around in their seats

Not nodding their heads

Not answering questions posed by the speaker

Meaning of the percentage of people in the audience with questions at the end of a speech
If a very big percentage of the people listening to the speech want to ask questions in means that they were paying attention and would like more information
Helping an audience to stay focused on the topic of a speech
Speakers can do this by talking a little bit more about the topic of the speech and by reviewing similar items noted in the speech.
Using psychographics to appeal to the people listening to a speech
A speaker who appears to have reached the listeners has probably reviewed and used the psychographics for the group.
Holding the interest of the listeners during a speech
To do this, a speaker can try to use examples of things that will help them to understand the items being discussed in the presentation
How to create a speech for listeners that do not know much about the topic
A speaker can learn more about the audience and try to make comparisons to situations with which they may already be familiar
Results of reviewing the psychographics of a group of listeners
A review of the psychographics can give the speaker information about the group members' ages, religious beliefs and interest in the subject matter of the speech
Audience-centered speech
A speech based on the audience's background so they can identify with the material. For example, a heart doctor speaking to senior citizens may speak about the health benefits of being active.
Audience analysis
Reviewing information about the audience can help speakers to create speeches about unfamiliar topics because they can try to make connections between the topic and the audience's experiences.
Preparing a speech that will be significant and interesting for the listeners
The speaker should think about the people who will listen to the speech and the purpose of the gathering while preparing to write the speech
Preparing a speech that will deliver a lot of information
The speaker can make connections between what they think will matter to the audience and how the information will help them after they hear the speech
Engaging the listeners
The speaker should try to use terms that the listeners attending the speech will understand and that will help to keep their attention
Demographics
Information about the group of listeners, including points about how old they are, how much money they make and what neighborhoods their homes are in
Creating a speech that the listeners will be open to hearing
The speaker can review information about the listeners to find similarities in their backgrounds and the speaker can learn more about the city or town where people will attend the speech
Assessing your performance during a speech
You can look for indicators from the listeners about whether your talk is effective by looking at non-verbal cues like body movements and whether they are looking directly at you
Formal audience analysis
For this type of review, the speaker takes information about what the listeners are accustomed to doing and uses the information to try to anticipate how they will respond to the speech
Listeners nodding their heads
This indicates that the listeners are paying attention to the speaker, like what they hear, and have similar views about the topics
Psychographics
Information about the background, experiences and personal ideals of people scheduled to listen to a speech
Informal audience analysis
For this type of review, the speaker takes a look at the reactions of the listeners while the speech is being given or when the speech is over

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