Basics of Differentiated Instruction Flashcards

Basics of Differentiated Instruction Flashcards
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Quality Parent Involvement in Education: Barriers

Lack of time on the part of parents

Parents feel they aren't qualified or educated enough to help

Difficulties with language barriers

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Quality Parent Involvement in Education: Characteristics

Continuing, open communication between schools and parents

Parent participation in education and educational choices

Parental aid with homework and out-of-school activities

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Benefits of Teacher Participation with Administrators

Improvements to teacher morale

Opportunities to collaborate with other teachers

More focus on the bigger picture

Improvements to educator efficiency

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Collaboration: Areas Where Teachers and Administrators Work Together

Encouraging parent engagement

Developing a curriculum

Setting up educational standards

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Direct Instruction: Disadvantages
Some see this kind of instruction as too passive for students, since they are just given information and cannot discover it on their own.
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Direct Instruction: Advantages
Math and spelling are taught well by this kind of instruction. It also reinforces facts and is good for students who require systematic instruction to succeed.
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Constructivism
An approach to learning that is student-driven and inquiry-based. It strives to makes students active participants in the educational process.
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Progressive Education Movement
An educational movement that took place in near the end of the 19th century and into the 20th century. Maria Montessori and John Dewey are associated with this movement.
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Inductive Reasoning
This kind of reasoning involves taking specific information and drawing generalizations from it, such as making judgements about acids and bases after looking at specific substances.
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Discovery Instruction
This type of instruction sees teachers as providing support and resources to facilitate student learning. They provide students with tools and encourage them to learn on their own.
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Direct Instruction
A type of instruction that involves directly giving information to students. It supports the development of deductive reasoning and is good for teaching small pieces of information.
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Differentiating Aspects of the Classroom: Process
This classroom aspect can be differentiated based on how teachers assign work or projects to their students.
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Differentiating Aspects of the Classroom: Learning Environment
A teacher who differentiates this aspect of the classroom will change the way his or her classroom feels. They may try to make it feel safe and respectful.
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Differentiating Aspects of the Classroom: Content
An aspect of the classroom that can be differentiated by providing students with different information or materials based on their learning skills.
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Differentiating Aspects of the Classroom: Product
This aspect of the classroom is differentiated when teachers provide different methods for students to show that they are learning.
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Differentiated Instruction
Teachers who use this method of instruction ensure they're accommodating different learning needs by changing their instruction accordingly.
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32 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

Working with this set of flashcards can give you the chance to review direct instruction, discovery instruction, scaffolding instruction and student-centered instruction. You'll be able to focus on cognitive learning, observational learning and learning through conditioning. Auditory, kinesthetic and visual learners will be discussed. You can focus on ways that teachers can differentiate their classrooms. Additionally, these cards can help you consider the benefits of working with administrators and parents to support student learning.

Front
Back
Differentiated Instruction
Teachers who use this method of instruction ensure they're accommodating different learning needs by changing their instruction accordingly.
Differentiating Aspects of the Classroom: Product
This aspect of the classroom is differentiated when teachers provide different methods for students to show that they are learning.
Differentiating Aspects of the Classroom: Content
An aspect of the classroom that can be differentiated by providing students with different information or materials based on their learning skills.
Differentiating Aspects of the Classroom: Learning Environment
A teacher who differentiates this aspect of the classroom will change the way his or her classroom feels. They may try to make it feel safe and respectful.
Differentiating Aspects of the Classroom: Process
This classroom aspect can be differentiated based on how teachers assign work or projects to their students.
Direct Instruction
A type of instruction that involves directly giving information to students. It supports the development of deductive reasoning and is good for teaching small pieces of information.
Discovery Instruction
This type of instruction sees teachers as providing support and resources to facilitate student learning. They provide students with tools and encourage them to learn on their own.
Inductive Reasoning
This kind of reasoning involves taking specific information and drawing generalizations from it, such as making judgements about acids and bases after looking at specific substances.
Progressive Education Movement
An educational movement that took place in near the end of the 19th century and into the 20th century. Maria Montessori and John Dewey are associated with this movement.
Constructivism
An approach to learning that is student-driven and inquiry-based. It strives to makes students active participants in the educational process.
Direct Instruction: Advantages
Math and spelling are taught well by this kind of instruction. It also reinforces facts and is good for students who require systematic instruction to succeed.
Direct Instruction: Disadvantages
Some see this kind of instruction as too passive for students, since they are just given information and cannot discover it on their own.
Collaboration: Areas Where Teachers and Administrators Work Together

Encouraging parent engagement

Developing a curriculum

Setting up educational standards

Benefits of Teacher Participation with Administrators

Improvements to teacher morale

Opportunities to collaborate with other teachers

More focus on the bigger picture

Improvements to educator efficiency

Quality Parent Involvement in Education: Characteristics

Continuing, open communication between schools and parents

Parent participation in education and educational choices

Parental aid with homework and out-of-school activities

Quality Parent Involvement in Education: Barriers

Lack of time on the part of parents

Parents feel they aren't qualified or educated enough to help

Difficulties with language barriers

Parent Involvement in Education
A process that focuses on keeping a student's parents engaged in the education of their child.
Student-Centered Instruction
Teachers using this educational style will focus on their students, rather than themselves.
Student-Centered Instruction: Advantages
Students given this kind of instruction typically improve their critical thinking skills. They cooperate, increase their self-confidence and feel a lot of motivation.
Humanistic Movement
A movement in psychology that put a lot of focus on individuals. It saw individuals as responsible for meeting their own needs and reaching their own achievements.
Critical Thinking
A skill that involves looking at all aspects of a given concept or argument.
Concept Maps
An organizational tool that can show background knowledge about a subject and that differentiates the learning process. With scaffolding, all students should be able to use this tool.
Learning
Educational psychology defines this as a process that involves multiple steps leading to permanent changes in a student's behavior, knowledge or understanding of the world.
Classical Conditioning
This type of conditioning involves learning to associate a cue with another action. For instance, you may associate the sound of your coffee maker with drinking a cup of coffee.
Operant Conditioning
A kind of conditioning that occurs when behaviors are reinforced with punishments or rewards.
Observational Learning
Individuals learn this way when they watch someone else complete a task and then imitate them.
Cognitive Learning
Students learning this way practice what they are doing or work from memorization. This happens internally.
Auditory Learners
These individuals learn best when they can listen to the instruction they are being provided with.
Kinesthetic Learners
Learners of this type have the best chance of learning if they can touch what they are studying.
Visual Learners
Students who learn in this way learn best by seeing things.
Scaffolding Instruction
You use this kind of instruction if you provide students with new information in pieces. Your lessons will build on what you previously taught students.
Scaffolding Instruction: Purpose
This instruction aims to split complicated information up into smaller pieces that are easier for students to understand.

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