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Basics of Writing Essays Flashcards

Basics of Writing Essays Flashcards
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Quickly Write an Essay: Step Three
This step in essay writing involves waiting until the end to finish your introduction and conclusion. Already knowing your main ideas means you'll be able to discuss them easily.
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Quickly Write an Essay: Step Two
Take this step in the essay writing process by picking out the major points you'll use and writing an outline for them.
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Quickly Write an Essay: Step One
You begin writing an essay with this step, which involves ensuring you grasp the question by reading the prompt multiple times.
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Proofreading Strategies: Read the Essay Aloud
A strategy that offers you a great way to notice small mistakes that you might skim over if reading silently. You can even read under your breath.
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Proofreading Strategies: Focus on Your Common Mistakes
This is a good way to break the proofreading process into easier steps. Pay attention to mistakes you make a lot and focus on fixing those errors first.
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Proofreading Strategies: Spell / Grammar Checker
Making use of these tools on your word processor can be a good first step to catch many errors, but it can't totally complete the process as computers miss some mistakes.
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Proofreading Strategies: Reading the Essay Backwards
You can use this strategy in situations where you can't read out loud. It involves starting from the end of your paper and reading it a sentence at a time back to the beginning.
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Proofreading: Basic Steps
Make sure each sentence is properly capitalized and punctuated, including the names of any books or poems. Make sure commas, apostrophes and semicolons are correct.
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Essays: Dealing with Tangents
If you find these diversions in your essays you should look at the problem area, find out what went wrong and try to fix it by removing unnecessary information or changing your approach.
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Essays: Prompts
The essay question that tells you what to write about. Look for key terms inside the question itself to hone the focus of the essay.
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Essays: Details
Writers must ensure they include enough specific information when writing these papers. Failing to do this can lead to vague statements and short sections.
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Thesis Statement
The sentence(s) that inform readers about your essay's point.
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Post-Outline
A tool you can use after finishing an essay. To do this, you go back over your writing and make sure that all your points are grouped together, limiting confusion.
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Essays: Purpose
Essays can be written to be informative, persuasive or entertaining. Informative essays provide facts, while persuasive ones try to make someone agree with you. Entertaining ones are fun.
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Flashcard Content Overview

Checking out these flashcards can help you get familiar with the purposes of essays and the ways that you can appeal to your readers. Go over steps to write an essay when you're pressed for time, along with ways to practice this skill at home. Focus on the uses of sources and how they should be included in essays, and methods to proofread your work. Additionally, you can use these cards to review the different logical fallacies you should avoid in essays.

Front
Back
Essays: Purpose
Essays can be written to be informative, persuasive or entertaining. Informative essays provide facts, while persuasive ones try to make someone agree with you. Entertaining ones are fun.
Post-Outline
A tool you can use after finishing an essay. To do this, you go back over your writing and make sure that all your points are grouped together, limiting confusion.
Thesis Statement
The sentence(s) that inform readers about your essay's point.
Essays: Details
Writers must ensure they include enough specific information when writing these papers. Failing to do this can lead to vague statements and short sections.
Essays: Prompts
The essay question that tells you what to write about. Look for key terms inside the question itself to hone the focus of the essay.
Essays: Dealing with Tangents
If you find these diversions in your essays you should look at the problem area, find out what went wrong and try to fix it by removing unnecessary information or changing your approach.
Proofreading: Basic Steps
Make sure each sentence is properly capitalized and punctuated, including the names of any books or poems. Make sure commas, apostrophes and semicolons are correct.
Proofreading Strategies: Reading the Essay Backwards
You can use this strategy in situations where you can't read out loud. It involves starting from the end of your paper and reading it a sentence at a time back to the beginning.
Proofreading Strategies: Spell / Grammar Checker
Making use of these tools on your word processor can be a good first step to catch many errors, but it can't totally complete the process as computers miss some mistakes.
Proofreading Strategies: Focus on Your Common Mistakes
This is a good way to break the proofreading process into easier steps. Pay attention to mistakes you make a lot and focus on fixing those errors first.
Proofreading Strategies: Read the Essay Aloud
A strategy that offers you a great way to notice small mistakes that you might skim over if reading silently. You can even read under your breath.
Quickly Write an Essay: Step One
You begin writing an essay with this step, which involves ensuring you grasp the question by reading the prompt multiple times.
Quickly Write an Essay: Step Two
Take this step in the essay writing process by picking out the major points you'll use and writing an outline for them.
Quickly Write an Essay: Step Three
This step in essay writing involves waiting until the end to finish your introduction and conclusion. Already knowing your main ideas means you'll be able to discuss them easily.
Quickly Write an Essay: Step Four
The final step of writing an essay is editing, even when you're pressed for time. Make sure you keep enough time to go over your work and fix errors.
Essays: Sources
You must use these to support your essay. Make sure you choose information from legitimate, academic sources that is as current as possible. Webpages should generally be avoided.
Sources: Inclusion in Essays
Make use of the sources you found by examining your outline and figuring out where the supporting information would be most likely to help strengthen your argument.
Sources: Understanding the Information
In order to make sure you grasp the information you find, you will need to read them and even make notes. This is important even with a time limit.
Essays: Practice Writing
You can do this by taking time at home to work on completing essays within a time limit. Doing this can help you get more comfortable with writing essays for school projects.
Editing: Questions to Consider

Is the thesis clear?

Is everything logical?

Are my points supported?

Are transitions smooth?

Are there grammatical errors?

Essays: Five-Paragraph Structure
A standard structure used for many essays. It begins with an introductory paragraph, has three body paragraphs and then ends with a concluding paragraph.
Logical Fallacy: Overly Broad Generalization
You commit this logical fallacy when you take something that is true on a small scale and treat it as though it is accurate on a much larger scale.
Logical Fallacy: Non Sequitur
This logical fallacy occurs when you include a conclusion that doesn't make sense based on anything else in your previous argument. This kind of conclusion comes out of nowhere.
Logical Fallacy: Either / Or Fallacy
In this type of logical fallacy you act as though there are only two possibilities, either someone feels a certain way or else they must have some kind of problem.
Logical Fallacy
The term used to describe arguments that are flawed in some way or that include errors in the process of reasoning.
Formal Writing
A style of writing that avoids informal terms and doesn't sound conversational. You typically don't include contractions when writing in this tone.
Appealing to Readers
You can accomplish this in an essay by considering what your audience cares about, or their perspective. Argue why your idea would benefit the audience to focus on this.
Writing for the Audience: Considerations

Who is my reader - my boss? my teacher?

What perspective does the reader have?

What is my reader's level of knowledge?

What do I want readers to get from this?

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