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Civil Rights in 1960s America Flashcards

Civil Rights in 1960s America Flashcards
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The Voting Rights Act of 1965
This piece of legislation prevented polling stations from issuing literacy tests prior to voting, in an attempt to prevent racial discrimination and voter suppression.
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Martin Luther King Jr.
During the 1960s, Martin Luther King Jr. advocated the use of nonviolent resistance to bring about social change and racial equality in the United States. King was assassinated in 1968.
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Malcolm X
A civil rights activist who advocated support for the Nation of Islam, Black Nationalism, and racial segregation in American society. Malcolm X was assassinated in 1965.
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The Black Panthers
A militant wing of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, formed by individuals who separated themselves from non-violent campaigns. The Black Panthers sought to address racial injustice.
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The Feminine Mystique
A book authored by Betty Friedan which paved the way for liberal feminism and second-wave feminism during the 1960s.
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The Port Huron Statement
A manifesto that became the template of the student movement during the 1960s. It was issued by Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) in 1962, and favored participatory democracy.
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The Great Society Program
A 1964 program by President Lyndon Johnson, which attempted to address poverty, racial injustice, urban decay, unemployment, national beautification, and education in the United States.
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This flashcard set addresses the American Civil Rights Movement, which unfolded during the 1950s and 1960s. It covers key events and legislature that advanced the cause of equality, including Sweatt v. Painter, Brown v. The Board of Education, the Civil Rights Act of 1957, Lyndon Johnson's Great Society Program, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Likewise, it also covers key figures and movements related to the Civil Rights Movement, including Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., the Black Panthers, second-wave feminism, and the Red Power Movement.

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The Great Society Program
A 1964 program by President Lyndon Johnson, which attempted to address poverty, racial injustice, urban decay, unemployment, national beautification, and education in the United States.
The Port Huron Statement
A manifesto that became the template of the student movement during the 1960s. It was issued by Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) in 1962, and favored participatory democracy.
The Feminine Mystique
A book authored by Betty Friedan which paved the way for liberal feminism and second-wave feminism during the 1960s.
The Black Panthers
A militant wing of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, formed by individuals who separated themselves from non-violent campaigns. The Black Panthers sought to address racial injustice.
Malcolm X
A civil rights activist who advocated support for the Nation of Islam, Black Nationalism, and racial segregation in American society. Malcolm X was assassinated in 1965.
Martin Luther King Jr.
During the 1960s, Martin Luther King Jr. advocated the use of nonviolent resistance to bring about social change and racial equality in the United States. King was assassinated in 1968.
The Voting Rights Act of 1965
This piece of legislation prevented polling stations from issuing literacy tests prior to voting, in an attempt to prevent racial discrimination and voter suppression.
Rosa Parks
In 1955, Rosa Parks challenged segregation on public transportation in Alabama, when she refused to surrender her seat to a white bus rider. She was arrested as a result, sparking bus boycotts.
Radical Feminism
A subsection of feminism that emerged during the Civil Rights Movement, which believed that men oppressed every aspect of women, and called for an anti-male revolution.
Conservative Feminism
A branch of feminism that emerged during the Civil Rights Movement. Conservative feminists believed in maintaining the status quo of female societal roles, and self-fulfillment.
The Red Power Movement
During the 1960s, the Red Power Movement was a coming together of Native American tribes in order to secure economic and social equality in American society.
Sweatt v. Painter, 1950
This Supreme Court decision, in which the University of Texas was ordered to admit a black law student into an all-white law school, is widely viewed as the start of the civil rights movement.
Brown vs. the Board of Education of Topeka
The 1954 Supreme Court ruling that segregation in public facilities violated African Americans' constitutional right of equal protection under the law.
The Civil Rights Act of 1957
The first piece of federal civil rights legislation in over 80 years, which established the Commission on Civil Rights, an organization responsible for investigating voter violations.

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