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Composition Theory & Application Flashcards

Composition Theory & Application Flashcards
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Anecdotes and their use in essays
A brief, interesting story can be used in an introduction to help engage the reader or persuade them to support your argument.
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Webbing (mapping)
A prewriting technique in which you relate different ideas to visualize the evolution of an argument and how the different points work together.
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Freewriting
A prewriting technique involving consistent writing for several minutes on a specific prompt. Though narrative (not a list), do not worry about sentence structure or content.
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Writing prompt
A topic or question provided to frame your essay. Gleaning a full, exact understanding of the prompt is the first step to writing an effective essay.
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Attributes of vague sentences
  • Repeats main argument
  • Provides no additional information
  • Contains little or no substance
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Strategies for simplifying ornate sentences
Be direct, avoid clichés, remove flowery language and simplify phrasing to ensure a clear argument.
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13 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

You can use this set of Composition Theory and Application flashcards to test your understanding for writing the best possible thesis statement and argumentative essay. The flashcard set reviews each step of the writing process, including fully understanding the writing prompt, defining a clear thesis statement, prewriting techniques like webbing and freewriting, and tips for introductions and conclusions. In addition, this set of flashcards will quiz you on your ability to simplify ornate sentences and avoid using vague sentences. You may improve your ability to write unified and coherent paragraphs with your mastery of this flashcard set.

Additional Study

For more information on this topic, review the following lessons:

Front
Back
Strategies for simplifying ornate sentences
Be direct, avoid clichés, remove flowery language and simplify phrasing to ensure a clear argument.
Attributes of vague sentences
  • Repeats main argument
  • Provides no additional information
  • Contains little or no substance
Writing prompt
A topic or question provided to frame your essay. Gleaning a full, exact understanding of the prompt is the first step to writing an effective essay.
Freewriting
A prewriting technique involving consistent writing for several minutes on a specific prompt. Though narrative (not a list), do not worry about sentence structure or content.
Webbing (mapping)
A prewriting technique in which you relate different ideas to visualize the evolution of an argument and how the different points work together.
Anecdotes and their use in essays
A brief, interesting story can be used in an introduction to help engage the reader or persuade them to support your argument.
Using a call to action in essays
Specific actions detailed to help create a desired outcome of the thesis issue; often used in the conclusion of an essay.
Main attributes of a unified and coherent paragraph
Each sentence supports the topic (usually the first) sentence of the paragraph and the argument progresses logically from one sentence to the next.
Should...because structure
Used when creating a thesis statement to clearly state your argument.
How to create a thesis statement without a specific prompt
Research the topic, determine a specific area of interest or argument and begin prewriting.
Brainstorming
A prewriting technique in which you note any phrase or idea that may be relevant to your essay.
Prewriting
The developing of ideas for a specific writing prompt using techniques such as brainstorming and mapping.
Bookending
The technique in which you directly relate a conclusion to the essay's introduction.

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