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Corrections & Correctional Institutions Flashcards

Corrections & Correctional Institutions Flashcards
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Importation model
The idea that prisons are microcosms of behaviors, roles, and values and brought in from the outside world
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Deprivation model
The idea that prison subculture is a result of the lack of normal life - things such as freedom, family, or privacy
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Prisonization
The process by which a new inmate learns the argot, code, and other important details of prison culture
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Prison code
An unofficial guideline for behavior that is similar throughout U.S. prisons, including rules regarding things such as inmate loyalty and guard mistrust
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Prison argot
The slang or vernacular of the prison subculture used throughout most U.S. prisons, such as chester, fish and cellie
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Main issue with lock up quota
It incentivizes private prisons to keep a certain number of people in jail, often resulting in higher incarceration rates and longer sentences.
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Mental illness in prisons
Emotional and psychological disorders affect more than 50% of American inmates, many of whom go untreated due to lack of funding for mental health facilities.
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3 negative issues with privatized prisons linked to profit margins

1. Lock up quotas resulting in longer sentences

2. Low budget resulting in poor conditions

3. Staff too small and underpaid

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The Great Depression's influence on prisons
Overcrowding started during this time when many people were so poor they resorted to criminal activity.
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Jail
Temporary secure areas run by the local sheriff to hold criminals who have not yet been charged with a crime; who have not been released on bail; or who have sentences of less than 1 year
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Transportation in Corrections
The philosophy that advocated shipping criminals to other countries so that they could not commit further crimes
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Deterrence
A philosophy of corporal punishment that threatens violence or humiliation to deter criminals from continued offenses
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Rehabilitation

The effort to improve the lives of inmates to discourage recidivism. Efforts may include education, treatment, and training opportunities.

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Congregate system
Inmates worked and ate together in total silence. Later, eating in silence was deemed inhumane and eliminated during 20th century prison reform.
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Main difference between men's and women's prisons

Higher rates of violent offenders and recidivism in men's prisons require a higher level of security than women's prisons, who statistically have fewer violent criminals.

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30 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

Use these flashcards to study the difference between modern prison systems, understand the culture of prisons, and review the history of prison ideology. This set contains key terms such as probation and parole as well as practices like rehabilitation and incapacitation.

Prisons are discussed through a historical lens, including the effects of the Age of Enlightenment and the Great Depression on prison philosophies. Modern issues such as lockup quota and gender differences are also addressed.

Front
Back
Main difference between men's and women's prisons

Higher rates of violent offenders and recidivism in men's prisons require a higher level of security than women's prisons, who statistically have fewer violent criminals.

Congregate system
Inmates worked and ate together in total silence. Later, eating in silence was deemed inhumane and eliminated during 20th century prison reform.
Rehabilitation

The effort to improve the lives of inmates to discourage recidivism. Efforts may include education, treatment, and training opportunities.

Deterrence
A philosophy of corporal punishment that threatens violence or humiliation to deter criminals from continued offenses
Transportation in Corrections
The philosophy that advocated shipping criminals to other countries so that they could not commit further crimes
Jail
Temporary secure areas run by the local sheriff to hold criminals who have not yet been charged with a crime; who have not been released on bail; or who have sentences of less than 1 year
The Great Depression's influence on prisons
Overcrowding started during this time when many people were so poor they resorted to criminal activity.
3 negative issues with privatized prisons linked to profit margins

1. Lock up quotas resulting in longer sentences

2. Low budget resulting in poor conditions

3. Staff too small and underpaid

Mental illness in prisons
Emotional and psychological disorders affect more than 50% of American inmates, many of whom go untreated due to lack of funding for mental health facilities.
Main issue with lock up quota
It incentivizes private prisons to keep a certain number of people in jail, often resulting in higher incarceration rates and longer sentences.
Prison argot
The slang or vernacular of the prison subculture used throughout most U.S. prisons, such as chester, fish and cellie
Prison code
An unofficial guideline for behavior that is similar throughout U.S. prisons, including rules regarding things such as inmate loyalty and guard mistrust
Prisonization
The process by which a new inmate learns the argot, code, and other important details of prison culture
Deprivation model
The idea that prison subculture is a result of the lack of normal life - things such as freedom, family, or privacy
Importation model
The idea that prisons are microcosms of behaviors, roles, and values and brought in from the outside world
Integration model
Drawing from deprivation and importation models, this is the idea that prison culture is a reflection of the outside world that is adjusted to life inside prison.
Overseers of prisoners' rights before the 1960s
Prison administrators
Influence of the Age of Enlightenment on prisons

This era brought about the idea that people weren't inherently bad or good, but capable of rehabilitation, which altered prisons to include the possibility to prove behavioral changes.

Probation
A criminal sentence in which a person is overseen outside of prison for a given period of time; common for first offenders
Parole
Once a sentence has been partially served with good, respectful behavior, an inmate may be let out into this type of community supervision. A goal of rehabilitation-centered prison system.
Explosion in a prison riot
The first and most dangerous stage in a riot during which there is an outbreak of disorder or rule breaking, usually through physical violence
Organization in a prison riot
The second stage in which a riot expands and more inmates join, spontaneously forming inmate-led groups where inmate leaders or negotiators emerge
Confrontation in a prison riot
The third stage in which the rioting prisoners come in contact with authorities, resulting in verbal or physical altercations
Termination in prison riots
The fourth stage that ends the riot either through negotiating, surrendering, or physically overpowering one side.
Medium security prisons
A state or federal correctional facility for low-level offenders who pose minimal public risk but have committed crimes such as theft or assault
Maximum security prisons
Highly guarded correctional facilities for inmates who have been deemed a threat to public safety or have been convicted of violent assault, robbery, murder, or other violent crimes
Supermax prisons
A prison operating in constant lockdown for the most violent criminals, such as terrorists or serial murderers
Incapacitation in corrections
Punishment theory stating that a person will not commit a crime if access to crime is unavailable
Solitary System

A type of prison system that did not allow inmates to interact at all. Prisoners spent all their time in individual cells, even while they worked, slept, or ate.

Theodore Kaczynski's prison

Also known as the Unibomber, this man is held in a supermax prison with other inmates considered very dangerous, such as Zacarias Moussaoui, who was tied to 9-11.

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