Correlative Conjunctions List & Flashcards

Correlative Conjunctions List & Flashcards
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Correct the mistaken placement of the correlative conjunction below.

My cat will either eat tuna or cat food.

My cat will eat either tuna or cat food.

'Tuna' and 'cat food' are the two equal parts being connected, so 'either' and 'or' need to go immediately before those words.

Got it
The following are all examples of _____ conjunctions: Both/and, either/or, not only/but also, and neither/nor.
Correlative
Got it

Identify the correlative conjunction in the sentence below:

Eloise hopes to see both Justin Timberlake and Rihanna in concert.

Both/and.
Got it

Identify the correlative conjunction in the sentences below:

Reuben only listens to classical music. He is interested in neither pop music nor hip hop.

Neither/nor.
Got it

Identify the correlative conjunction in the sentence below:

Damien wants to go not only to the Justin Timerlake concert, but also to the Rihanna concert.

Not only/but also.
Got it

Identify the correlative conjunction in the sentence below:

Marco wants to go either to the Justin Timberlake concert or to the Rihanna concert.

Either/or.
Got it
A pair of conjunctions that connects two equally important parts of a sentence is called a _____.
Correlative conjunction.
Got it
15 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

Correlative conjunctions are conjunction pairs that help us link or connect words, phrases and sentences together. Unlike subordinating conjunctions, correlative conjunctions join ideas that are equally important. Use this set of flashcards to review some of the most common correlative conjunctions and to practice using them properly in sentences.

Front
Back
A pair of conjunctions that connects two equally important parts of a sentence is called a _____.
Correlative conjunction.

Identify the correlative conjunction in the sentence below:

Marco wants to go either to the Justin Timberlake concert or to the Rihanna concert.

Either/or.

Identify the correlative conjunction in the sentence below:

Damien wants to go not only to the Justin Timerlake concert, but also to the Rihanna concert.

Not only/but also.

Identify the correlative conjunction in the sentences below:

Reuben only listens to classical music. He is interested in neither pop music nor hip hop.

Neither/nor.

Identify the correlative conjunction in the sentence below:

Eloise hopes to see both Justin Timberlake and Rihanna in concert.

Both/and.
The following are all examples of _____ conjunctions: Both/and, either/or, not only/but also, and neither/nor.
Correlative

Correct the mistaken placement of the correlative conjunction below.

My cat will either eat tuna or cat food.

My cat will eat either tuna or cat food.

'Tuna' and 'cat food' are the two equal parts being connected, so 'either' and 'or' need to go immediately before those words.

Correct the mistaken placement of the correlative conjunction below.

Mr. Puffles is a fussy cat. He will nor sleep neither play until he has been fed.

Mr. Puffles is a fussy cat. He will neither sleep nor play until he has been fed.

The correlative conjunction 'neither/nor' must be used in a specific order.

Correct the mistaken placement of correlative conjunctions below.

He is an exemplary cat, both for his pouncing skills and his cuddling abilities.'

He is an exemplary cat, for both his pouncing skills and his cuddling abilities.

'Both/and' needs to come directly before each compared element: 'his pouncing.../his cuddling...'

Correct the mistaken placement of the correlative conjunction below.

Mr. Puffles walks not only on a leash, but also sips from a glass.

Mr. Puffles not only walks on a leash, but also sips from a glass.

'Not only' and 'but also' go directly before the same kind of word: the verbs 'walks' and 'sips'.

Add 'either/or' to combine the sentences below.

Dennis likes pot pie. Dennis likes pot roast.

Dennis likes either pot pie or pot roast.

Add 'neither/nor' to combine the sentences below.

Dennis likes pot pie. Dennis likes pot roast.

Dennis likes neither pot pie nor pot roast.

Add 'both/and' to combine the sentences below.

Minnie likes to dance. Minnie likes to sing.

Minnie likes both to dance and to sing.

Add 'not only/but also' to combine the sentences below.

Minnie likes to dance. Minnie likes to sing.

Minnie not only likes to dance, but also likes to sing.

Correct the mistaken placement of a correlative conjunction below.

I would like to either swim or to jog.

I would like either to swim or to jog.

'Either/or' goes directly in front of equal elements: 'to swim' and 'to jog'.

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