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Differentiated Instruction Assessments Flashcards

Differentiated Instruction Assessments Flashcards
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Performance Assessment: Dynamic Assessment
Teachers can use this kind of assessment to focus on how learning something new may change what a student knows or how the student reasons.
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Performance Assessment: Restricted Performance
These are performance tasks that don't take a long time to complete. Students get one opportunity to perform this kind of task.
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Paper-Pencil Assessment
These assessments require students to write out responses to specific questions. They're good for assessing student understanding of terminology and concepts that are either correct or incorrect.
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Performance Assessment
Assessments that don't use writing to measure the skills of a student. This may involve completing an experiment or presenting information orally.
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Formal Assessment
An assessment that it planned out and used in a systematic fashion. Students have the chance to prepare for this kind of assessment in advance.
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Informal Assessment
These assessment occur spontaneously based on how students act during class time.
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Assessment: Purposes
These can be used to motivate students and review their understanding of various subjects. They can also be used to offer feedback to your class.
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Assessment
A way for teachers to infer information about the knowledge of their students. Teachers do this by looking at the behavior of students.
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Bloom's Taxonomy: Evaluating (Evaluation)
A level of Bloom's Taxonomy that focuses on judging, prioritizing and criticizing information you are learning.
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Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering (Knowledge)
The first level of Bloom's Taxonomy. At this level, students will recall what they have learned. Defining and reciting information are necessary skills at this level.
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Bloom's Taxonomy: Understanding (Comprehension)
This level of Bloom's Taxonomy focuses on the ability of students to express what they've learned using their own words. Students should be able to summarize what they study.
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Bloom's Taxonomy: Applying (Application)
Students at this level of Bloom's Taxonomy can take what they've learned and apply it to other situations.
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Bloom's Taxonomy: Analyzing (Analysis)
The ability to notice and assess patterns is developed at this stage of Bloom's Taxonomy. Students will focus on comparing and contrasting different ideas at this stage.
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Bloom's Taxonomy: Creating (Synthesis)
The highest level found in Bloom's Taxonomy. Students who reach this level need to have a high amount of cognitive ability.
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Bloom's Taxonomy
Cognitive skills are listed in this tool, which teachers can use to assess the level of thinking demonstrated by their students.
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Mastery Learning
A concept associated with Bloom's Taxonomy that asserts that students need to master lower-order skills and thinking before they can progress in their studies.
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Types of Learners

Auditory

Visual

Read / Write it

Tactile / Kinesthetic

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35 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

You can work with these flashcards to go over the benefits of informal and formal assessments. The levels of Bloom's Taxonomy and its use as an assessment tool will be considered. The options teachers can use when setting up performance assessments are discussed by these flashcards. You'll also be able to focus on formative assessments and how they can be used before class, during class and after class.

Front
Back
Types of Learners

Auditory

Visual

Read / Write it

Tactile / Kinesthetic

Mastery Learning
A concept associated with Bloom's Taxonomy that asserts that students need to master lower-order skills and thinking before they can progress in their studies.
Bloom's Taxonomy
Cognitive skills are listed in this tool, which teachers can use to assess the level of thinking demonstrated by their students.
Bloom's Taxonomy: Creating (Synthesis)
The highest level found in Bloom's Taxonomy. Students who reach this level need to have a high amount of cognitive ability.
Bloom's Taxonomy: Analyzing (Analysis)
The ability to notice and assess patterns is developed at this stage of Bloom's Taxonomy. Students will focus on comparing and contrasting different ideas at this stage.
Bloom's Taxonomy: Applying (Application)
Students at this level of Bloom's Taxonomy can take what they've learned and apply it to other situations.
Bloom's Taxonomy: Understanding (Comprehension)
This level of Bloom's Taxonomy focuses on the ability of students to express what they've learned using their own words. Students should be able to summarize what they study.
Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering (Knowledge)
The first level of Bloom's Taxonomy. At this level, students will recall what they have learned. Defining and reciting information are necessary skills at this level.
Bloom's Taxonomy: Evaluating (Evaluation)
A level of Bloom's Taxonomy that focuses on judging, prioritizing and criticizing information you are learning.
Assessment
A way for teachers to infer information about the knowledge of their students. Teachers do this by looking at the behavior of students.
Assessment: Purposes
These can be used to motivate students and review their understanding of various subjects. They can also be used to offer feedback to your class.
Informal Assessment
These assessment occur spontaneously based on how students act during class time.
Formal Assessment
An assessment that it planned out and used in a systematic fashion. Students have the chance to prepare for this kind of assessment in advance.
Performance Assessment
Assessments that don't use writing to measure the skills of a student. This may involve completing an experiment or presenting information orally.
Paper-Pencil Assessment
These assessments require students to write out responses to specific questions. They're good for assessing student understanding of terminology and concepts that are either correct or incorrect.
Performance Assessment: Restricted Performance
These are performance tasks that don't take a long time to complete. Students get one opportunity to perform this kind of task.
Performance Assessment: Dynamic Assessment
Teachers can use this kind of assessment to focus on how learning something new may change what a student knows or how the student reasons.
Performance Assessment: Product Assessment
When assessing students in this way, teachers examine some tangible object created by the student.
Performance Assessments: Options

Individual vs. Group

Static vs. Dynamic

Product vs. Process

Restricted vs. Extended

Performance Assessment: Process Assessment
Teachers use this method to assess a performance task when there is no physical product to judge. Instead, the teacher looks at the student's actions or behavior.
Performance Assessment: Extended Performance
A type of performance task that is judged over a lengthy amount of time. Sometimes teachers may assess students in this way over the course of an entire semester.
Performance Assessment: Static Assessment
This is a very common type of assessment. It measures what students already know or skills that students already possess.
Performance Assessment: Guidelines

Scoring criteria is set out before the task

Administration procedures are standardized

Students are encouraged to ask questions if they need to

Tasks are clear and unambiguous

Informal Assessment: Strategies

Intentional

Incidental

Formative Assessments: Assessments Prior to Instruction
These assessments are used before class begins.
Formative Assessments: Assessments after Instruction
Assessments that are completed after a class.
Formative Assessment
A type of assessment used throughout the learning process that guides teachers in adjusting their instruction. It as an assessment designed FOR learning.
Formative Assessment: Entrance Ticket
A formative assessment used before class. This occurs when a teacher asks students some kind of question prior to the beginning of class.
Formative Assessment: 4-Corner Assessment
This formative assessment should be used prior to class. It allows students to gather in different corners of the room to show how well they understand a previous lesson.
Formative Assessment: Colored Cups
Teachers can use this formative assessment during class. It involves giving students cups of different colors for them to show if they understand a lesson or not.
Formative Assessment: Thumbs Up, Sideways, or Down
Students apply this formative assessment during class time by moving their thumbs to show if they understand a subject or if they're confused.
Formative Assessment: Pyramid Assessment
A post-class formative assessment. Teachers give out triangles of paper that students most fill in with various information about the lesson.
Formative Assessment: Learning Log
This formative assessment is completed after a lesson. It requires students to complete a journal.
Formative Assessment: Individual Dry Erase Boards
When using this in-class formative assessment, teachers give each student his or her own board to write down answers to questions.
Formative Assessment: Benefits

Students get feedback and self-evaluate

Increases in student learning

Students can set goals and ask question

Identification of student errors increases

Modification of instruction improves

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