Dissociative Disorders List & Flashcards

Dissociative Disorders List & Flashcards
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Common causes of dissociative identity disorder
Childhood trauma, including abuse, stress, and inadequate nurturing.
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Technical name for 'split personalities' or 'multiple personalities disorder'
Dissociative identity disorder
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Environmental Stressors
Light, noise, and trauma are environmental stressors that can trigger neural responses, such as entering or leaving a dissociative fugue state.
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Dissociative Amnesia
The loss of memory not caused by injury or illness during which the brain can lose hours or years without the patient realizing the information is missing.
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Dissociative Identity Disorder
The mental state in which a person's brain has distinct and separate areas of experience and personality, similar to a fugue state. It is often brought on by childhood trauma.
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Dissociative Fugue (Fugue State)
The state of totally forgetting one's personal identity for a few hours or days, usually brought on by external stressors.
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Dissociative Disorders
When one part of the brain ignores or dismisses another part, resulting in issues of awareness, recollection, personal identity, or outward perception.
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Flashcard Content Overview

This flashcard set can help you study common dissociative disorders, their symptoms, and causes. The set includes dissociative disorders like amnesia, dissociative identity, and depersonalization disorders. Each of the major illnesses are defined with common symptoms or characteristics of those suffering from the illness.

Front
Back
Dissociative Disorders
When one part of the brain ignores or dismisses another part, resulting in issues of awareness, recollection, personal identity, or outward perception.
Dissociative Fugue (Fugue State)
The state of totally forgetting one's personal identity for a few hours or days, usually brought on by external stressors.
Dissociative Identity Disorder
The mental state in which a person's brain has distinct and separate areas of experience and personality, similar to a fugue state. It is often brought on by childhood trauma.
Dissociative Amnesia
The loss of memory not caused by injury or illness during which the brain can lose hours or years without the patient realizing the information is missing.
Environmental Stressors
Light, noise, and trauma are environmental stressors that can trigger neural responses, such as entering or leaving a dissociative fugue state.
Technical name for 'split personalities' or 'multiple personalities disorder'
Dissociative identity disorder
Common causes of dissociative identity disorder
Childhood trauma, including abuse, stress, and inadequate nurturing.
Defense Mechanism
A mental process that attempts to avoid anxiety or conflict. This can include denial, somatization, and repression, but it can also manifest as dissociative disorders such as split personalities or fugue states.
Symptoms of dissociative amnesia
Abrupt inability to remember past experiences or personal information, anxiety, depression, and confusion.
Treatment options for dissociative amnesia disorder
Counseling, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), medication, family or art therapy, and hypnosis.
Depersonalization/Derealization Disorder
The state of feeling detached from one's brain or body while still fully aware of reality.
Common treatment for dissociative fugue
Because the condition usually only lasts at most a few days, the most common treatment is communication therapy.
Four symptoms of dissociative identity disorder

1. More than two personalities

2. More than one personality can take control of brain functions

3. Loss of personal memory

4. Cannot be explained by a different diagnosis

Repressed Memories
Recollections of events including or happening around something traumatic. They are often forgotten or stored in one's long-term memory and may be accessible later.
Reality Testing
A personal evaluation of one's senses or environment to understand the actual from the created world. This is an easy act in a healthy brain but difficult for those with psychosis.

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