Education Pioneers Flashcards

Education Pioneers Flashcards
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Mary McLeod Bethune
She worked hard to try to make education available to children from all backgrounds and nationalities.
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Maria Montessori
Using a similar educational view as Dewey, Montessori was successful in teaching handicapped students, or those who were considered 'uneducable' in her day.
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John Dewey's Contributions to Education
He helped to shape the practices of learning by having students work alone or together to solve problems and classrooms in which students and the teacher cooperate in creating the rules.
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John Dewey's and Margaret Haley's Shared Education Views
Both Dewey and Haley wanted education to be focused on the child and based on a partnership between different disciplines in a classroom where children explore ideas together with their teacher.
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Pragmatism
Pragmatism focuses on using all available resources to experience life to aid in learning; Jane Addams, John Dewey, and Johann Pestalozzi all subscribed to this viewpoint.
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John Dewey
His views on education include the idea that children will learn if they are given problems to solve.
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Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi
Nicknamed the 'Father of Modern Education,' he wanted children from different environments and with different capabilities to receive an education and he was greatly interested in social justice.
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Jane Addams
Addams believed education should have a focus on training in the arts.
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Horace Mann's Lasting Principles
He believed education should be available to everyone, wanted teachers to be trained. and promoted democratic teaching practices.
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Horace Mann
Mann was the leading founder of the public school system. He was influential in the Common Schools Movement and also developed normal schools to train teachers.
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Margaret Haley
She trained to be a teacher in one of Horace Mann's normal schools and held an important position in the Chicago Teachers Federation.
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Booker T. Washington
He wanted African Americans to move forward academically by accepting racial difficulties and working despite them; his ideas were not popular at the time.
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24 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

This flashcard set covers topics from schools for African Americans to leaders who wanted to make sure children could receive a public school education. . Learn about Maria Montessori and her interest in schooling for less fortunate children and about other educators whose teaching methods and legislative work paved the way for children from varying backgrounds to attend schools as well as the educators who were involved in the creation and success of organizations like the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the Chicago Teachers Federation.

Front
Back
Booker T. Washington
He wanted African Americans to move forward academically by accepting racial difficulties and working despite them; his ideas were not popular at the time.
Margaret Haley
She trained to be a teacher in one of Horace Mann's normal schools and held an important position in the Chicago Teachers Federation.
Horace Mann
Mann was the leading founder of the public school system. He was influential in the Common Schools Movement and also developed normal schools to train teachers.
Horace Mann's Lasting Principles
He believed education should be available to everyone, wanted teachers to be trained. and promoted democratic teaching practices.
Jane Addams
Addams believed education should have a focus on training in the arts.
Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi
Nicknamed the 'Father of Modern Education,' he wanted children from different environments and with different capabilities to receive an education and he was greatly interested in social justice.
John Dewey
His views on education include the idea that children will learn if they are given problems to solve.
Pragmatism
Pragmatism focuses on using all available resources to experience life to aid in learning; Jane Addams, John Dewey, and Johann Pestalozzi all subscribed to this viewpoint.
John Dewey's and Margaret Haley's Shared Education Views
Both Dewey and Haley wanted education to be focused on the child and based on a partnership between different disciplines in a classroom where children explore ideas together with their teacher.
John Dewey's Contributions to Education
He helped to shape the practices of learning by having students work alone or together to solve problems and classrooms in which students and the teacher cooperate in creating the rules.
Maria Montessori
Using a similar educational view as Dewey, Montessori was successful in teaching handicapped students, or those who were considered 'uneducable' in her day.
Mary McLeod Bethune
She worked hard to try to make education available to children from all backgrounds and nationalities.
Mary McLeod Bethune's Achievements
She gave counsel to a President, set up a college for African-American students, attended the initial United Nations conference, and created the National Council for Negro Women.
Noah Webster
He helped to shape a distinct American education by publishing a textbook and creating uniform American English language standards.
Thomas Jefferson
His beliefs about public education were too progressive for his era to be put into place. One of his concepts was that school governing bodies should set the rules for how schools were operated.
W.E.B. DuBois

He thought that education should be focused on all aspects of a person's life. Unlike Booker T. Washington, he was unwilling to compromise and wanted immediate equality.

NAACP
W.E.B. DuBois was one of the people responsible for starting the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), a group which promotes African Americans' rights.
Interdisciplinary Curriculum

A classroom curriculum that focused on several subjects and gave students the freedom to move around as they wished. This was supported by John Dewey.

Common School Movement

This movement supported the idea of well-developed public schools that were tax-funded. Horace Mann was a driving force behind this idea.

The Montessori Method

This educational style focuses on productive play. It uses a child-centered approach and encourages child of different age levels to learn together.

The Pestalozzi Method

An educational approach designed to help every part of a person develop. This method focuses on giving students of all backgrounds an education that is appropriate.

The Pestalozzi Method: The Heart

Pestalozzi considered this the most important part of a student. Developing this helped students learn how to be compassionate with others.

A Grammatical Institute of the English Language

A book published by Noah Webster in 1783. This book was also known as the Blue-Backed Speller. It helped students learn reading, writing, and spelling.

Problem-Based Learning

In this type of teaching, students are given a change to active find solutions to problems in order to learn. It was supported by John Dewey's ideas.

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