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Elements of Dramatic Literature Flashcards

Elements of Dramatic Literature Flashcards
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Dramas: Cast of Characters
A list of all the characters appearing in a play. This is usually placed at the beginning of a play, before the dialogue is recorded.
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Playbill
The term for a play's program that is provided to the audience before the play begins.
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Dramas: Setting
Where the play takes place. This is established through stage directions, which can describe the play's location.
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Asides
A way for a playwright to inform the audience of what a character thinks. To accomplish this, the character talks to the audience while other characters are on stage.
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Dramas: Dialogue
This is what characters say over the course of a play. It is used to guide the plot, establish characterization and show conflicts faced by different characters.
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Stage Directions
Information included in a play that is meant to tell the crew performing the play what to do. It may involve information about a character's mannerism or how to speak.
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Soliloquies
In plays, this occurs when a character is alone on stage and talking about his or her thoughts. This allows the audience insight into the character's feelings.
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Analyzing a Play: Unique Aspects
Analyzing this kind of work requires considerations that aren't present when looking at prose, because it should be performed, not just read.
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Analyzing a Play
A process that allows you to dig into a dramatic work. You complete this by figuring out the theme and determining what the playwright did to create this theme.
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19 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

You can use these flashcards as study tools to review the way dramas use setting, dialogue, stage directions, asides and soliloquies. This set allows you to focus on the styles of theatre seen in ancient Greece, the Middle Ages and the Romantic Period. You'll also be able to consider morality plays and Absurdist works. Furthermore, checking out these cards can help you consider the process of analyzing a play.

Front
Back
Analyzing a Play
A process that allows you to dig into a dramatic work. You complete this by figuring out the theme and determining what the playwright did to create this theme.
Analyzing a Play: Unique Aspects
Analyzing this kind of work requires considerations that aren't present when looking at prose, because it should be performed, not just read.
Soliloquies
In plays, this occurs when a character is alone on stage and talking about his or her thoughts. This allows the audience insight into the character's feelings.
Stage Directions
Information included in a play that is meant to tell the crew performing the play what to do. It may involve information about a character's mannerism or how to speak.
Dramas: Dialogue
This is what characters say over the course of a play. It is used to guide the plot, establish characterization and show conflicts faced by different characters.
Asides
A way for a playwright to inform the audience of what a character thinks. To accomplish this, the character talks to the audience while other characters are on stage.
Dramas: Setting
Where the play takes place. This is established through stage directions, which can describe the play's location.
Playbill
The term for a play's program that is provided to the audience before the play begins.
Dramas: Cast of Characters
A list of all the characters appearing in a play. This is usually placed at the beginning of a play, before the dialogue is recorded.
Dramas: Symbolism
To do this you use one thing to stand in for something else, such as when you use an object to represent a theme or emotion.
Theatre in Ancient Greece
This culture took theatre and used it in their worship, eventually turning it into a ritual.
Theatre in the Renaissance
During this period, people in Europe grew interested in the theatre again. This led to the popularity of playwrights such as Molière and Christopher Marlowe.
Theatre in the Middle Ages
At this period in time, the Church grew interested in plays and began encouraging mystery, miracle and morality plays.
Theatre in the Romantic Period
Plays created in this literary period focused on both natural and supernatural elements. They often included a hero working against a society that wasn't just.
Theatre in Absurdism
In this type of drama, there's no rationality or logic. The playwrights who created these dramas believed that life had no purpose.
Drama
A literary genre that features a work that must be performed. These performances can occur in a theater. They can also be televised or broadcast over radio. They are made of lines of dialogue.
Morality Play
This type of play rose to popularity during the Medieval Period. These plays were allegorical and were populated by heroes who fought evil.
William Shakespeare: Use of Prose
Shakespeare often wrote using this when he was writing characters of low social class. It was also used for characters who were insane.
William Shakespeare: Use of Verse
In his plays, Shakespeare wrote in this when he was trying to convey wisdom and powerful emotions.

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