Elements of Technical Documents Flashcards

Elements of Technical Documents Flashcards
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Background information in technical documents
Context for the data - may include historical information, contemporary research, social impact, or an explanation of the need for document.
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Purpose statement in introductions for technical documents
A definitive sentence describing the intent of the document and the scope of the material analyzed in the document.
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Contents of a technical document's introduction

1. Contextual information

2. Statement of purpose

3. Conclusion sentence that helps define scope and audience

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Introductions in technical documents
Provides an overview of the subject of the document as well as the purpose for the document.
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3 common problems with conclusions in technical documents

1. Summarizing - should include more details

2. Improper pronoun use - stay formal and do not use 'I' or 'we'

3. Vague language

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3 steps to writing a good conclusion in a technical document

1. Begin with a general statement based on research findings

2. Show specific data that backs the statement

3. Analyze the data and conclude with recommendations

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Analyzing and concluding in the conclusions of technical documents
The investigation and connection of data to the main subject or thesis statement. It shows how you reached your conclusion based upon the data.
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Conclusion structure in technical documents
General to specific, beginning with an overview of the subject and ending with specific data points.
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Headings in technical documents
Short explanations that introduce the subject matter that will be found in the following part of the text.
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Conclusions in technical documents
Summaries of important points in light of presented facts and data; should help readers make decisions about the subject.
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20 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

You can use this flashcard set to review the main elements of technical writing to help you study for a test or improve your writing skills. The elements - such as headings, introductions, and conclusions - are defined and detailed, including tips to improve writing and avoid common problems. The set includes sample problems to help you quiz yourself on specific elements and the different types of documents, sentences, and purposes for various types of technical writing.

Front
Back
Conclusions in technical documents
Summaries of important points in light of presented facts and data; should help readers make decisions about the subject.
Headings in technical documents
Short explanations that introduce the subject matter that will be found in the following part of the text.
Conclusion structure in technical documents
General to specific, beginning with an overview of the subject and ending with specific data points.
Analyzing and concluding in the conclusions of technical documents
The investigation and connection of data to the main subject or thesis statement. It shows how you reached your conclusion based upon the data.
3 steps to writing a good conclusion in a technical document

1. Begin with a general statement based on research findings

2. Show specific data that backs the statement

3. Analyze the data and conclude with recommendations

3 common problems with conclusions in technical documents

1. Summarizing - should include more details

2. Improper pronoun use - stay formal and do not use 'I' or 'we'

3. Vague language

Introductions in technical documents
Provides an overview of the subject of the document as well as the purpose for the document.
Contents of a technical document's introduction

1. Contextual information

2. Statement of purpose

3. Conclusion sentence that helps define scope and audience

Purpose statement in introductions for technical documents
A definitive sentence describing the intent of the document and the scope of the material analyzed in the document.
Background information in technical documents
Context for the data - may include historical information, contemporary research, social impact, or an explanation of the need for document.
Conclusion sentences in introductions for technical documents
The final sentence of an introduction that describes what the document will be discussing and what audience it is primarily targeting.
Identify the type of sentence: This report will show that cats are better than dogs.
Purpose sentence
Identify the appropriate type of sentence for a purpose statement: Interrogative, declarative, exclamatory, or imperative.
Declarative
Recommendations in technical documents' conclusion
The sentence or section that gives the author's opinion as to what action(s) should be taken based upon the research-supported conclusion.
A type of technical document that does not require recommendations
End-user manuals that simply describe how to use a product.
3 reasons to make a recommendation in technical writing

1. The data and research support it

2. You are an expert and think it's warranted

3. It was requested

2 tips to writing a good recommendation in technical writing
State one problem at a time and provide the recommendation using distinct language.
Identify the problem: 'The product's color is an ugly yellow-green; production should be delayed.'
The recommendation is vague and seems to carry a personal bias.
Abstract for a technical document
A brief overview of the document that helps readers discern if reading the whole report is relevant to their needs.
Main reason to not use personal pronouns in technical writing
Personal pronouns - such as 'I' and 'we' - make the writing seem based in personal beliefs rather than researched facts.

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