Copyright

Essay Sources & Citations Flashcards

Essay Sources & Citations Flashcards
1/28 (missed) 0 0
Create Your Account To Continue Studying

As a member, you'll also get unlimited access to over 79,000 lessons in math, English, science, history, and more. Plus, get practice tests, quizzes, and personalized coaching to help you succeed.

Try it risk-free
Try it risk-free for 30 days. Cancel anytime
Already registered? Log in here for access
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)
An alphanumeric phrase that serves as an internet link, used in APA citations for web resources.
Got it
Order of the information needed to cite a web resource in MLA format.
Author, date created, title, and date accessed.
Got it
Difference in MLA and APA citations for magazines
In APA, the article title is in quotation marks and the date is situated differently. In MLA, you must specify if the article was retrieved online or in a print source.
Got it
6 main details needed to cite a magazine article
Author, article title, publication title, publication date, volume number, issue number, and page numbers.
Got it
Revised book
An updated version of a previous publication, often made necessary in light of new information.
Got it
Edited book
A collection of written works collected from various sources by one or more editors.
Got it
Order of the information for a journal citation
Author, title, journal name, issue number, publication date, and page numbers.
Got it
Peer-reviewed scholarly journal
A journal whose articles are reviewed by unaffiliated professionals before publication; commonly cited in academic writing.
Got it
In-text citation
A citation that is marked in parentheses within the body of the text; generally refers to the full bibliography.
Got it
Order of the information needed for a book citation
Author, publication date, title, publication city, publishing house.
Got it
3 times when citation is necessary

You learned the information from an outside source

You are presenting the information as fact

Someone else has published similar or related information

Got it
Plagiarism
Using another author's words or ideas without proper citation, whether or not it is intentional.
Got it
3 main style guides for bibliographies
MLA, APA, and Chicago formats
Got it
Bibliography
A list of sources consulted by the author for information used in the written work.
Got it
28 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

This flashcard set covers every aspect of properly using informative materials in research writing. Key terms such as bibliography and Digital Object Identifier are included, as well as the nuanced differences in citation styles for the main formatting guides, including in-text citations and proper use of abbreviations. These flashcards will help you test your knowledge of the different citation formats and how to use them.

Front
Back
Bibliography
A list of sources consulted by the author for information used in the written work.
3 main style guides for bibliographies
MLA, APA, and Chicago formats
Plagiarism
Using another author's words or ideas without proper citation, whether or not it is intentional.
3 times when citation is necessary

You learned the information from an outside source

You are presenting the information as fact

Someone else has published similar or related information

Order of the information needed for a book citation
Author, publication date, title, publication city, publishing house.
In-text citation
A citation that is marked in parentheses within the body of the text; generally refers to the full bibliography.
Peer-reviewed scholarly journal
A journal whose articles are reviewed by unaffiliated professionals before publication; commonly cited in academic writing.
Order of the information for a journal citation
Author, title, journal name, issue number, publication date, and page numbers.
Edited book
A collection of written works collected from various sources by one or more editors.
Revised book
An updated version of a previous publication, often made necessary in light of new information.
6 main details needed to cite a magazine article
Author, article title, publication title, publication date, volume number, issue number, and page numbers.
Difference in MLA and APA citations for magazines
In APA, the article title is in quotation marks and the date is situated differently. In MLA, you must specify if the article was retrieved online or in a print source.
Order of the information needed to cite a web resource in MLA format.
Author, date created, title, and date accessed.
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)
An alphanumeric phrase that serves as an internet link, used in APA citations for web resources.
Preferred information for citing a web resource in APA format
Author, publication year, title, volume and issue number (if relevant), pages used, and Digital Object Identifier (DOI) or web link.
4 steps to using research materials

1. Consult experts

2. Search broadly then narrow down thesis

3. Use new information in your writing

4. Add something original

In-text citations of a publication with three or more authors
After the first time mentioned, you may name the first author in the list, then add 'et al.' For example, (Garcia, et al., 1998).
Abbreviating corporations in in-text citations
The first mention requires the full name and abbreviation: the Center for Disease Control (CDC). After this, refer to it in citations as the abbreviation with the date. (CDC, 2012).
When should you use page numbers in in-text APA citations?
Only when using a direct quote.
Who uses APA?
Though it stands for the American Psychological Association, a wide variety of academic disciplines use this citation style.
Main attributes of MLA formatting
12 point font, double-spaced, 1 inch margins, first line of paragraphs indented, and pages numbered in the upper right hand corner.
How to include a page number for in-text citations in MLA format if the author is mentioned by name in the sentence
Put the page number in parenthesis at the end of the sentence.
Key difference of the Chicago Manual Style versus MLA and ALA
The way it uses footnotes and endnotes.
Works cited
List of bibliographic resources that appears at the end of an essay.
Situation in which it is possible to plagiarize even with citation
When you contribute no original ideas.
3 types of bibliographies
Annotated, enumerative, and subject
Citation
The naming of the source for the information used in a written work.
Parenthetical citation
In-text citations, usually found in parenthesis at the end of a sentence.

To unlock this flashcard set you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member

Already a member? Log In

Support