Ethics in Philosophy Flashcards

Ethics in Philosophy Flashcards
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Eudaimonia

This term refers to happiness and well-being. It was a term used by Plato to describe what we should try to achieve in human life.

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Virtue Ethics

This ethical approach was of interest to Plato. It puts a lot of focus on the moral character of an individual.

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Ethics of Care

Carol Gilligan asserted that girls learned this, while boys learned the ethics of justice. She thought this dealt with responding to what others needed in real life.

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Baruch Spinoza

He supported ethical subjectivism, or the idea that there isn't an objective standard available for ethical behavior. He thought ethical statements just covered things we disapproved of.

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Ethical Relativism

An ethical viewpoint that argues that people cannot be forced to follow a moral standard that is universal and unbending. This says that culture is responsible for shaping a person's morals.

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Ethical Absolutism

This ethical stance asserts that all people should be subject to morals that are specific and certain.

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Ayn Rand

A writer who believed people should be rational egoists. She thought this would make people want a stable society and act it ways that would support this kind of world.

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Rational Egoism

An approach that states that you must use rational principles to uncover your self-interest and then act on this selfishness, which is not seen as immoral. This view was supported by Ayn Rand.

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Atheist

An individual who has no belief in God. You are still capable of behaving in a moral way if you fit this criteria.

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Divine Command Theory

A theory that sees moral laws as originated with God. Supporters of this theory may or may not be concerned with proving the existence of God.

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Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics: Moral Responsibility

This states that we are only responsible for actions we committed voluntarily. This means that if you do something good because you're forced to, you should not be praised.

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23 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

You can use these flashcards as a study tool to review different ethical views, including:

  • Rational Egoism
  • Ethical Absolutism
  • Ethical Relativism
  • Virtue Ethics
  • Utilitarianism
  • Stoicism

You'll be able to focus on values, morals and ethics. These cards cover both descriptive and prescriptive morality as well as the divine command theory. Furthermore, checking out this set can give you the chance to go over the beliefs of the following individuals:

  • Ayn Rand
  • Baruch Spinoza
  • Thomas Hobbes
  • St. Augustine
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Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics: Moral Responsibility

This states that we are only responsible for actions we committed voluntarily. This means that if you do something good because you're forced to, you should not be praised.

Divine Command Theory

A theory that sees moral laws as originated with God. Supporters of this theory may or may not be concerned with proving the existence of God.

Atheist

An individual who has no belief in God. You are still capable of behaving in a moral way if you fit this criteria.

Rational Egoism

An approach that states that you must use rational principles to uncover your self-interest and then act on this selfishness, which is not seen as immoral. This view was supported by Ayn Rand.

Ayn Rand

A writer who believed people should be rational egoists. She thought this would make people want a stable society and act it ways that would support this kind of world.

Ethical Absolutism

This ethical stance asserts that all people should be subject to morals that are specific and certain.

Ethical Relativism

An ethical viewpoint that argues that people cannot be forced to follow a moral standard that is universal and unbending. This says that culture is responsible for shaping a person's morals.

Baruch Spinoza

He supported ethical subjectivism, or the idea that there isn't an objective standard available for ethical behavior. He thought ethical statements just covered things we disapproved of.

Ethics of Care

Carol Gilligan asserted that girls learned this, while boys learned the ethics of justice. She thought this dealt with responding to what others needed in real life.

Virtue Ethics

This ethical approach was of interest to Plato. It puts a lot of focus on the moral character of an individual.

Eudaimonia

This term refers to happiness and well-being. It was a term used by Plato to describe what we should try to achieve in human life.

Absurdity

Philosophers consider this to be the drive to locate meaning in something that has no meaning to offer.

Deontology

We use this term when discussing the study of duty.

Stoicism

A philosophy from long ago that argues that virtue leads to happiness and that vice leads to unhappiness. This was supported by the writings of Marcus Aurelius.

Thomas Hobbes

This thinker was greatly interested in natural law. Unlike other people who studied this, he used a descriptive approach and thought that morality could change if given time.

St. Augustine

A man who described natural law as the way God's law was revealed to man with the use of reason. St. Thomas Aquinas shared this belief with him.

Hedonist

An individual who lives his or her life by attempting to maximize the amount of pleasure he or she experiences.

Utilitarianism

A philosophical viewpoint that says that actions that cause the greatest number of individuals to experience increases in pleasure are the best.

Ethics

This philosophical branch is primarily concerned with issues relating to morality.

Prescriptive Morality

This kind of morality deals with telling people how they should act or behave.

Descriptive Morality

The type of morality that considers how individuals believe they should act. It does not offer an opinion about these actions.

Values

The things in your life that you think are worthwhile or in some way important.

Morals

These are rules that guide the way people should behave, or that deal with how they think they should behave.

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