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Evaluating Sources for Research Flashcards

Evaluating Sources for Research Flashcards
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Electronic Resources

Any academic source that you can access over the internet. These may include videos, journals, articles and even ebooks.

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Electronic Resources: Databases

These are online collections of scholarly articles. The sources you can find here face quality standards. Examples include ProQuest and EBSCO.

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LibGuides

These bibliographies are electronic and they are offered by libraries. They contain hyperlinks to a variety of sources.

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Google Scholar

A tool available through Google that allows you to use Google to read peer-reviewed articles that are held by libraries.

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P.A.R. Source Evaluation

You can complete this type of source evaluation when you look at the source's Purpose, Authority and Reliability.

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Intranet

These computer networks are private. They are often used by businesses and contain information that the company does not want to share with others.

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Library

An organization that allows you to rent books. You may also be able to pay these places to gain access to databases that contain peer-reviewed research and articles.

Got it
Wiki

An online encyclopedia that can be changed and adjusted by public users. These sites do not always offer information that is trustworthy, so you shouldn't use them for academic research.

Got it
Blog

A website that serves an as individual's journal to record personal information and experiences. These are not considered scholarly sources, as they often look at an issue from only one side.

Got it
Sponsoring Organization

This is a group that provides website hosting for academic articles. Educational institutions, government agencies, institutes and business companies may all serve this role.

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Source Reliability

This refers to how trustworthy a source is. Newer sources have higher levels of this, as do sources that can contain information you can easily verify.

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AAOCC Source Evaluation: Accuracy

You assess the overall correctness of the information included in a potential source when evaluating this portion of a source.

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AAOCC Source Evaluation: Authority

The portion of source evaluation that considers the creator of the source and whether or not he or she was qualified.

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AAOCC Source Evaluation: Currency

This factor focuses on when a source was written and if the information it contains reflects an up-to-date understanding of your subject.

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AAOCC Source Evaluation: Objectivity

Evaluating this facet of a source requires you to consider the impartiality of the source's author.

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AAOCC Source Evaluation: Coverage

You evaluate sources on this basis when you look at how thoroughly your topic is addressed by the source.

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Print Resources: Fiction Books

Books written to tell a story that is not true for the purpose of enjoyment. You should not use these as sources for academic research papers.

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Writing Resources: Print

These resources are published by someone official. Examples include newspapers, magazines and books. Some kind of quality control is usually exerted over these sources.

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37 cards in set

Flashcard Content Overview

The flashcards in this set can help you review AAOCC, P.A.R. and CRAAP methods of source evaluation. You'll be able to go over the uses of print and online sources, as well as their relative reliability. Additionally, the core skills associated with critical thinking are covered by this set, along with the steps in the critical thinking process.

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Writing Resources: Print

These resources are published by someone official. Examples include newspapers, magazines and books. Some kind of quality control is usually exerted over these sources.

Print Resources: Fiction Books

Books written to tell a story that is not true for the purpose of enjoyment. You should not use these as sources for academic research papers.

AAOCC Source Evaluation: Coverage

You evaluate sources on this basis when you look at how thoroughly your topic is addressed by the source.

AAOCC Source Evaluation: Objectivity

Evaluating this facet of a source requires you to consider the impartiality of the source's author.

AAOCC Source Evaluation: Currency

This factor focuses on when a source was written and if the information it contains reflects an up-to-date understanding of your subject.

AAOCC Source Evaluation: Authority

The portion of source evaluation that considers the creator of the source and whether or not he or she was qualified.

AAOCC Source Evaluation: Accuracy

You assess the overall correctness of the information included in a potential source when evaluating this portion of a source.

Source Reliability

This refers to how trustworthy a source is. Newer sources have higher levels of this, as do sources that can contain information you can easily verify.

Sponsoring Organization

This is a group that provides website hosting for academic articles. Educational institutions, government agencies, institutes and business companies may all serve this role.

Blog

A website that serves an as individual's journal to record personal information and experiences. These are not considered scholarly sources, as they often look at an issue from only one side.

Wiki

An online encyclopedia that can be changed and adjusted by public users. These sites do not always offer information that is trustworthy, so you shouldn't use them for academic research.

Library

An organization that allows you to rent books. You may also be able to pay these places to gain access to databases that contain peer-reviewed research and articles.

Intranet

These computer networks are private. They are often used by businesses and contain information that the company does not want to share with others.

P.A.R. Source Evaluation

You can complete this type of source evaluation when you look at the source's Purpose, Authority and Reliability.

Google Scholar

A tool available through Google that allows you to use Google to read peer-reviewed articles that are held by libraries.

LibGuides

These bibliographies are electronic and they are offered by libraries. They contain hyperlinks to a variety of sources.

Electronic Resources: Databases

These are online collections of scholarly articles. The sources you can find here face quality standards. Examples include ProQuest and EBSCO.

Electronic Resources

Any academic source that you can access over the internet. These may include videos, journals, articles and even ebooks.

CRAAP Source Evaluation: Acronym

C = Currency

R = Relevant materials

A = Authority

A = Accuracy

P = Purpose

Bias

A preference for one person, idea or thing that is displayed by a writer. This may be identified by the use of emotional language, the omission of important facts and a lack of citations.

Assumptions

Writers taken these points for granted as being understood by everyone. Therefore, the writer will not offer evidence to support or prove them.

Stereotypes

These are simplified beliefs about things or people that are held by a large amount of people.

Critical Thinking Process Steps: Stating a Point of View

This is the first part of the critical thinking process. You accomplish this by telling others what you believe.

Critical Thinking Process Steps: Identifying Assumptions

You carry out this step in the critical thinking process when you focus on the things you might automatically believe about a situation.

Critical Thinking Process Steps: Identifying Origins

Individuals work on this part of the critical thinking process when they determine why they believe a certain thing, or what made them hold an assumption.

Indicative Words

These are words or phrases that tell you what an author is about to do. If you see 'for example,' you know the writer is most likely going to provide an explanatory statement.

Structure of a Text

This is how a text is set up by the writer. Observing this can help you pick out the key ideas the writer is going to focus on.

Critical Thinking Core Skills: Humility

You demonstrate this skill you are given information that proves you are wrong and you then admit to your error.

Critical Thinking Core Skills: Skepticism

This skill requires you to question new information that you are provided with, instead of just taking everything on faith and believing it.

Critical Thinking Core Skills: Curiosity

The critical thinking skill that requires you to want to learn about new things and to be open to what you might discover.

Critical Thinking

The skill you use to make logical judgments that are carefully thought out.

Anecdotal Story

Any story that is drawn from the experience of a single person.

Media Multitasking

You participate in this every time you use at least two types of media at the same time.

Mass Media

A form of communication designed to reach a large amount of people in order to influence them.

Media Literacy

The skill used by individuals who look at media and then analyze or evaluate it. This skill is also used in the creation of media.

Questioning Media

You do this to decipher media. You should begin by asking who created the media. You can then look at how your attention was gained and why the message was sent.

Media

A way of communicating with and influencing others. Magazines, radios and televisions all carry this kind of communication.

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