Flashcards - Elements of Literature

Flashcards - Elements of Literature
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allegory
As a literary device, an allegory in its most general sense is an extended metaphor
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tragedy
Tragedy is a form of drama based on human suffering that invokes an accompanying catharsis or pleasure in audiences
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catharsis
Catharsis is the purification and purgation of emotions-especially pity and fear-through art or any extreme change in emotion that results in renewal and restoration
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motif
In narrative, a motif is any recurring element that has symbolic significance in a story
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allusion
Allusion is a figure of speech, in which one refers covertly or indirectly to an object or circumstance from an external context
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Irony
Irony , in its broadest sense, is a rhetorical device, literary technique, or event in which what appears, on the surface, to be the case, differs radically from what is actually the case
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simile
A simile is a figure of speech that directly compares two things
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metaphor
A metaphor is a figure of speech that refers, for rhetorical effect, to one thing by mentioning another thing
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metaphor
A metaphor is a figure of speech that refers, for rhetorical effect, to one thing by mentioning another thing
simile
A simile is a figure of speech that directly compares two things
Irony
Irony , in its broadest sense, is a rhetorical device, literary technique, or event in which what appears, on the surface, to be the case, differs radically from what is actually the case
allusion
Allusion is a figure of speech, in which one refers covertly or indirectly to an object or circumstance from an external context
motif
In narrative, a motif is any recurring element that has symbolic significance in a story
catharsis
Catharsis is the purification and purgation of emotions-especially pity and fear-through art or any extreme change in emotion that results in renewal and restoration
tragedy
Tragedy is a form of drama based on human suffering that invokes an accompanying catharsis or pleasure in audiences
allegory
As a literary device, an allegory in its most general sense is an extended metaphor
Assonance
Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds to create internal rhyming within phrases or sentences, and together with alliteration and consonance serves as one of the building blocks of verse
repetition
Repetition is an 1843 book by Søren Kierkegaard and published under the pseudonym Constantin Constantius to mirror its titular theme
litotes
In rhetoric, litotes is a figure of speech that uses understatement to emphasize a point by stating a negative to further affirm a positive, often incorporating double negatives for effect
Metonymy
Metonymy is a figure of speech in which a thing or concept is called not by its own name but rather by a metonym, the name of something associated in meaning with that thing or concept
symbolic foreshadowing
Foreshadowing or guessing ahead is a literary device by which an author hints what is to come
the parable
A parable is a succinct, didactic story, in prose or verse, which illustrates one or more instructive lessons or principles
understatement
Understatement is a form of speech or disclosure which contains an expression of lesser strength than what would be expected
prophecies
Prophecy involves a process in which one or more messages are allegedly communicated to a prophet by a god or spirit and often are then communicated to other people
Imagery
Imagery, in a literary text, is an author's use of vivid and descriptive language to add depth to their work

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