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Flashcards - FTCE: Inferential Comprehension

Flashcards - FTCE: Inferential Comprehension
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onomatopoeia
An onomatopoeia is a word that phonetically imitates, resembles or suggests the source of the sound that it describes
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metaphor
A metaphor is a figure of speech that refers, for rhetorical effect, to one thing by mentioning another thing
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tone
In literature, the tone of a literary work expresses the writer's attitude toward or feelings about the subject matter and audience
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mood
A mood is an emotional state
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8 cards in set
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mood
A mood is an emotional state
tone
In literature, the tone of a literary work expresses the writer's attitude toward or feelings about the subject matter and audience
metaphor
A metaphor is a figure of speech that refers, for rhetorical effect, to one thing by mentioning another thing
onomatopoeia
An onomatopoeia is a word that phonetically imitates, resembles or suggests the source of the sound that it describes
simile
A simile is a figure of speech that directly compares two things
first person
A first-person narrative is a story from the first-person perspective: the viewpoint of a character writing or speaking directly about themselves
genre
Genre is any category of literature, music, or other forms of art or entertainment, whether written or spoken, audio or visual, based on some set of stylistic criteria
Fiction prose
Prose is a form of language that exhibits a grammatical structure and a natural flow of speech, rather than a rhythmic structure as in traditional poetry

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